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November 2020

Everywhere are/ is stray dogs

I think these two sentences should be grammatically correct: Stray dogs are everywhere in the market. In the market, there are many stray dogs. However, I am not sure which one below is correct? Does "everywhere" function as a pronoun there? In the market, everywhere are stray dogs. In the market, everywhere is stray dogs.Read More...
Hello, Little Pig, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. "everywhere" is usually an adverb, not a pronoun. It can only be a relative adverb when followed by a clause, for example: - Everywhere I look (= in every place where I look), there are stray dogs. Therefore, your sentences above don't work. You should say: - In the market, there are stray dogs everywhere. or one of your first sentences:Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

In the last two hours

Here’s a question in my textbook. In the last two hours, I _______ my lessons. A. Had revised B. Have revised C. Revise D. Revised The answer is A while it feels more natural to say: I revised my lessons in the last two hours and hence it should be D. Thoughts?Read More...
Hi, Englishnerd, and welcome to the G.E, I don't agree with the model answer here. In an exam, I'd go with 'B'. The present perfect shows that it is closer to 'now'. See a similar question here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...9#636190323566139819Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

use of since

Hi there, Please can you tell me which of these sentences is correct and why? 1- It's been a long time since I watched your videos. 2- It's been a long time since I have watched your videos. Should I use simple past ou present perfect after SINCE? Thank you so much in advance. Regards, Jess.Read More...
Hi, JessyA, Both are grammatically correct. If you want to indicate a repeated action, use the present perfect. If you want to refer to a single action use the past simple. See here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...with-present-perfectRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

capitalized on the time it has take

What does "capitalized on the time it has taken" mean and is the "it" referring the counting process? This year, however, Trump capitalized on the time it has taken for several states to process the influx of mail-in ballots to make baseless claims that the election had been "stolen" from him. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/11/08/opinions/trump-legal-challenge-election-results-wu/index.htmlRead More...

Did not see

What does "did not see" mean in the sentence below? Democrats did not see the results they were hoping for in the Senate or House, although they lead in the race to retain control of the House. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/11/07/politics/takeaways-2020-presidential-race/index.htmlRead More...
Thanks, thought it has implied meaning.Read More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

Usage 'which', 'that' and 'where' in a clause

Which of the following sentences are correct? 1- This is the store at which I met my friend. 2- This is the store which I met my friend at . 3- This is the store that I met my friend at . 4- This is the store I met my friend at. 5- This is the store where I met my friend .Read More...
All five of those sentences are grammatically correct, Subhajit. "Where" has the value of a prepositional phrase in the relative clause, which explains why (5) is correct without the "at"-phrase. "That" and "which" are interchangeable in restrictive relative clauses that are not about human beings; that explains why (2) and (3) are correct. Sentence (2) uses pied piping, and (4) a zero relative.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Please check if this report is semi-formal

Hey guys. I have an exam tomorrow and ı had to write a semi-formal report for it. Can you please check if mine is too informal or has grammar mistakes? It is not a problem if it is too formal. Thank you already. This weekend there was a meeting between 9th and 10th graders about extra activities outside school. A lot of ideas were discussed and some of their dates are even settled. There were many quality ideas and one of them was football training. Many students appreciated this idea. The...Read More...

Have difficulty doing

Hi, here is a test question. You had no difficulty l have ___ a meal . A. make B. making C. to make D. made It is easy to make the right choice, but how do you parse this sentence? In particular, is "making a meal" inside the relative clause, or is the relative clause just "I have" and "making a meal" serves as an adverbial in the main clause?Read More...
This question should have been designed by non native speakers. I searched for "have * [difficulty] *"on COCA , and I didn't find any examples of this structure followed by a relative clause, so this kind of usage seems to be unidiomatic. Thanks to you both. I have learned a lot from your discussion.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

Capitalisation of the words "planning application"

Hi everyone. I have an interesting query: the words "planning application" I assume are common nouns. But if I refer to a specific planning application, such as the Village Hall planning application, does that turn it into a proper noun that needs capitalisation (ie Village Hall Planning Application)? thanks! SteveRead More...
Thanks Gustavo, very helpful.Read More...
Last Reply By Steve H · First Unread Post

Under XYZ's umbrella, Under the XYZ umbrella or Under the umbrella of XYZ (edited topic)

Hello, what is the grammatically correct way to use the phrase 'under the umbrella'. Are all three examples below correct? We have been operating for five years, under XYZ's umbrella. We have been operating for five years, under the XYZ umbrella. We have been operating for five years, under the umbrella of XYZ.Read More...
Hello, Rabia, You should have started a new thread. You didn't actually edit your original topic — you changed it completely, and that makes David's comment sound out of place. Anyway, to answer your NEW question, we need to know what "XYZ" stands for. Only then can we decide which of the three alternatives works better.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

demonstrative usage

Hello I wonder if "those" in the following sentences are used as a demonstrative as pronoun or determiner? In what aspect? I would warn again to those who agree to allow driver's phone use. It's quite unfair for those who don't smoke to risk that kind. Thank.Read More...
Where have you taken those sentences from, Jiho? Have you made them up by yourself? Actually, they contain several mistakes (e.g. warn to sb, risk that kind ) . Anyway, "those" is a pronoun, not a determiner, there, being equivalent to "the ones (= the people)."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Usage of for before 'how many'

Do I need to use for in the following question? For How many days was the war of Mahabharat fought?Read More...
To add to what Steve H (welcome to GE, Steve) and David have said, there seems to be a short list of verbs that can do without "for" (or other similar prepositions like over or during ) to introduce an adverbial of duration, such as be, stay, remain, last, live.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

on its end

These are the definitions given for 'upend' in the WordNet ▸ verb: set, turn, or stand on end ("Upend the box and empty the contents") ▸ verb: become turned or set on end ("The airplanes upended") Source: https://onelook.com/?w=upend& ls=a Now, does 'end' mean 'bottom' here? Is 'end' used that way? Did the planes turn upside down, or did they turn in such a way as to become vertical? 1) I stood the broom on its end. In this case, which side is upmost, the brush or the handle? Gratefully,...Read More...
Hi navi yes, I think that end does mean bottom here. I haven't heard of the term upended with regards to airplanes. Perhaps it means that when they do a vertical dive, they have become upended, as a duck does when it feeds. End is not usually used to mean bottom though. As far as the broom goes, it depends which end you're standing the broom on, the brush end or the handle end! SteveRead More...
Last Reply By Steve H · First Unread Post

"the same/same"?

I know that "same-sex marriage" is used without an article. But why? Same usually requires "the". On the other hand, why not a? It was a same-sex marriage . - possible?Read More...
Hi, Me_IV—Yes, the sentence "It was a same-sex marriage" is possible. "Same-sex marriage" is commonly found with "a." If you search for the phrase "a same sex marriage" on Google, you will find about a million results; and on the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), there are 81 instances of it. In the noun phrase "a same-sex marriage," the indefinite article ("a") is complemented by the noun "marriage," in relation to which "same-sex" functions as a modifier. At the level of...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

future / gerund

Hi all, If I say: 1) Mary will be calling in an hour, because she has a question to you. 2) Mary will call in an hour, because she has a question to you. 3) Mary is going to call in an hour, because she has a question to you. All of these sentences are being used with a sense of future idea. Alhtough, if I say sentence 1, isn't it too wordy/ redundant in English? And, is it really ok to use it both is spoken and formal English? (In my native language, Brazilian Portuguese, we see this...Read More...
Hi, JessyA—All three sentences are incorrect because of "to" in "a question to you," which should be changed to "a question for you." With that change, all three sentences are correct, and there is very little difference between them. The use of "is going to" in (3) indicates, along with futurity, that it is Mary's intention to call in an hour; however, the indication of intentionality is subtle and not nearly so important as the idea of futurity. You needn't worry about the use of the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Passive voice or subject complement

Hello, I am getting confused between a subject complement and passive voice structure. If I say: The number people in the office is reduced (=stating a fact) then am I correct by saying that reduced is the subject complement used to describe the number of people in the office or is i s reduced passive voice? Thank you as always for your kind help.Read More...
Many thanks. Always great answers on this forumRead More...
Last Reply By Mrchuffie · First Unread Post

job (of) preparing/working...

1) We didn't do as good a job preparing the garden for planting as we should have . 2) She enjoys her job working with local communities . Q1) Do sentences (1) and (2) mean the following, with the optional preposition "of"? 1a) We didn't do as good a job ( of ) preparing the garden for planting as we should have . 2a) She enjoys her job ( of ) working with local communities . Q2) Is a comma needed after "job" in both (1) and (2)? 1b) We didn't do as good a job, preparing the garden for...Read More...
Interesting question, Language learner. I'll give you my view. I'll start by answering Q2. I don't find the comma to be correct in either of the cases. Curiously, however, in the case of (1b) this would be correct: 1c) Preparing the garden for planting, we didn't do as good as job as we should have(, but sowing the seeds, we were great.) Unlike in (1c), where the V-ing phrase is an adverbial adjunct, in (1) and (1a) the mentioned phrase functions as a restrictive apposition, that is, as an...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Expression

Hi there, I came across this sentence somewhere on the web: "I do my friend". I tried to look it up online, but wasn't successful. I'm not sure if it's correct or if it has ambiguous meaning. Could you please if this sentence makes sense at all in English, and, if so, what does it mean? Thanks a lot in advance. Kind regards, Jess.Read More...
Hi, JessyA, Most probably, "do" there is being used as a pro-form that substitutes for the verb in the interlocutor's question, for example: A. Do you speak English? B. I do , my friend. (Notice there should be a comma before the vocative "my friend.")Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

will be started vs will be starting.

As a native speaker the following sentence # 1 below d oesn't sound natural to me. Am I correct? If so, why is it wrong please. 1. The cours e will be started o n the 5th November. I think the following sound better: The course will be starting on the 5th November. The course will start on the 5th November. Also, is will be started i n the passive voice? Thank you as always.Read More...
Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Mrchuffie · First Unread Post

In the corner or On the corner?

Hi admin! Can you tell me which the sentence below is correct or incorrect, please - There is a table in the top right-hand corner of the room. - There is a table on the top-right hand corner of the room. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Moon Le, We usually use "in the corner" for rooms (enclosed spaces) and "on the corner" (also "at the corner") for streets (open spaces). I wonder what you mean by "top right corner." This kind of phrase will be typically used with surfaces like pages, screens, keyboards, pictures, etc. where there is a top and a bottom (top right corner, bottom right corner, top left corner, bottom left corner).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Somewhere, as a pronoun

- Adding them all up, somewhere between 167 million and 175 million individual human beings were deliberately extinguished through politically motivated carnage. How do you parse "somewhere between 167 million and 175 million individual human beings"? 1. Somewhere is modified by PP "between 167 million and 175 million individual human beings". 2. Somewhere is modified by "between 167 million and 175 million", and then they work as a whole to modify " individual human beings". Which of the...Read More...
I get it. Thanks, Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post
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