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November 2020

What is the correct Relative Pronoun?

We shall meet again on the 20th of October. We can then discuss this matter. Should the relative pronoun be " when " or " where "?Read More...
Hello, Diyath, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. In the sentence you presented: the correct relative word is "when," because reference is being made to a date (time): - We shall meet again on the 20th of October, when we can discuss this matter. Notice that the use of "shall" above is either mostly British English and/or carries a sense of obligation (apart from future) which would not be present if "will" were used. Relative "where" can be used to refer to situations, being thus half way...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Use of "both" for 3? (Joys seven)

Hello, I have a question about the usage of "both" in a song. I believe "both" is for two, like "both you and me." But I have an example of "both" that seems to represent three persons. "Both Father, Son, and Holy Ghost To all eternity." (Joys Seven) Here, "both" apparently refers to three, "Father," "Son," and "Holy Ghost." Is this a mere exception, some kind of conventional (or biblical) expression? Why does "both" appear here? And can we find other examples for the same usage today?Read More...
David, thank you so much for answering such a minor question. I really appreciate it.Read More...
Last Reply By saorin25 · First Unread Post

Can/May

Which modal verb is correct in the following context? 1- The school authority has decided to arrange annual sports next week. Those who are interested in this can/may contact Peter Hedley. 2-The government has decided to recruit 500 new employees in the railways on the basis of its eligibility criteria. Those who are eligible may/can apply on its website. Would it be still grammatical without any of the above modals?Read More...
What alternatives are you thinking of, Subhajit?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Bullet points

In support of your contention, you provided the following documents: a. The finance document of the disputed loan. b. The resolution of the trust. Should the bullet point to be started with an upper case or a lower case? (e.g. The finance document or the finance document).Read More...
Hi, Tony—Neither (a) nor (b) should begin with an upper-case letter or end with a period. They are not sentences. They are noun phrases. One theme in your postings seems to be lack of clarity as to what is and is not a sentence.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

everything, it or them

Hello I know “everything” is singular. Everything is going to be all right. In the following situation I just made up, is it OK to say “I picked them up” instead of “I picked it up”? In my mind, everything means apples, onions, potatoes and other things, all of which are countable, therefore plural. I bought apples, potatoes, onions, and other things at the grocery store and put them in the bag. On my way out, I slipped and fell down. Everything was on the floor. I picked them up and put...Read More...
Thank you , David. Very professional answer and I agree. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

It's hard for me to use of?

I learn the english. example all of us but It's hard for me to use of. instead put all us without of and in the end the game instead in the end of the game. Anybody help me please? ThxRead More...
Hello, Surfbug. This site requires that members speak English with at least a minimal level of proficiency. I have the sense that you're an absolute beginner.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

daughters or daughters'

I feel so petty writing this when everyone is going through such hard times. This is not a new topic. Context. I am talking about the colour of eyes "light grey or blue." It was said in a derogatory remark. he "has a very peculiar look with his eyes." I only know of one daughter to have these coloured eyes so I dont want to name her. "One of his daughters seems to have had very light grey or blue eyes with a dark rim." Or leave it out altogether. Many thanks.Read More...
What could possibly make you think an apostrophe might be needed there?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

food, a food, foods

Hello. Which one is correct? Why? - It was such (delicious food - a delicious food) that we ate it all. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Robby zhu—I said "the likelier choice" because I doubt that the author of this grammar exercise had in mind the other meaning, the meaning related to "such a delicious food." That is, I suspect that the Egyptian ministry of education fancies "such delicious food" the only correct choice. But I don't know that with certainty. And even if they did think that the only correct choice, "such a delicious food" would continue to be correct, with its own distinct meaning. As is usual with...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

A big deal of ???

What type of nouns and verbs (singular or plural) that follow "A big deal of"? Thank you very much!Read More...
I've known about "a great deal of" already. Actually I am studying about the quantifiers and our teacher asked what would follow "a big deal of". Maybe she wanted us to notice a bit about the case. Thank you for your reply 😊Read More...
Last Reply By khuonglinh · First Unread Post

She says that her ear hurts her

1) If you hit your leg just a second ago, and still feel the pain, you say: a) "Ouch! That hurt !", Or "Ouch! That hurts !" 2) Tell me where it hurts. 3) My head hurts. 4) She says that her ear hurts her . Q1) Do we say, "Ouch! That has hurt !"? (using present perfect) Q2) Do we say, "Ouch! That hurt/hurts me !"? (using an object of the verb) Q3) What do the subjects "that" and "it" refer to in sentences (1a) and (2) respectively? Q4) Is the object "her" necessary in sentence (4)? If yes,...Read More...
Thank you. In all the examples in the OP, can I use "is hurting" instead of "hurts"?Read More...
Last Reply By Language learner · First Unread Post

Before/Earlier/Previously

What is the difference between before, earlier and previously in the following sentence? 1- John, I emailed you regarding this problem before/earlier/previously but you did not response. Besides this can I also use previously and earlier at the first position? Can I say the following? - John, earlier/previously I emailed you regarding this problem but you did not response.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—Both your examples are ungrammatical no matter which of your options you choose, because you cannot say " did not response ." You need to say " did not respond " instead. "Respond" is a verb; "response" is a noun. You can use "before," "earlier" or "previously" interchangeably in the first example, in which you might consider using the past perfect ("had e-mailed"). In the second example, yes, "earlier" or "previously" can be fronted.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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