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Regarding the COVID-19 Pandemic

David, Moderator
Dear Grammar Exchange members, As we continue our grammar discussions, I want you to know that I am aware that we are all struggling in various ways as a result of the current pandemic and that my heart goes out to all of you. I hope that you and your loved ones are safe and healthy. Although we may not know each other personally, we all know that there is much more to us than the English grammar issues we discuss here. This post is devoted to the dimensions of you and your lives that I know...Read More...
Terry, Thank you for thinking of me in these bleak times. I have been having to deal with some personal issues and look forward to resuming my usual presence on the forum as soon as possible. I join you and the rest in wishing the best for all of our community and their families. Deus uobiscum, DocV Santa Cruz, California, USRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

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Perfect tense for completion and duration

Hi, guys. Can we express both completion and duration with perfect tense? For example, "I have run for 30 minutes." Is this construction correct?Read More...
You should use "just," Lucas: "I have just run for 30 minutes." "I have just read/cooked/fished/swum/etc. for an hour." Note, however, that the "completed action" is merely an activity here, not an accomplishment (running a mile, reading 50 pages, etc.). The situation denoted by the verb phrase matters. If you'd like more clarification, let me know. I have composed this short post on my cell phone. I am away from my computer right now.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

George Floyd

George Floyd cried out for his mother twice while being murdered. His mother died 2 years ago. Let that sink in. I have 2 questions regarding that passage above: 1. What is the meaning of "Let that sink in"? 2. Can I write this sentence: "George Floyd cried out for his mother twice while being murdered" like this way: George Floyd cried out for his mother twice while he was murdered.?Read More...

Present Perfect Simple vs Continuous

I do understand that both tenses, the Present Perfect Simple and Continuous, are used for repeated actions. I started researching the topic a long time ago and found out a lot of differences between the two. The difference that I need to ask you about is the following: This is from Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. I've understood from it that we don't use the Present Perfect Continuous when we say how often we have done something. However, I came across the following sentence,...Read More...
Hi, Rasha, It is a matter of 'focus / emphasis'. In your example above " I've been getting this magazine every week for a year ", we use the progressive form to indicate / emphasize that an action is ongoing and repeated . The focus here isn't on 'how often', but on 'how long'. The present perfect isn't wrong here, by the way, but the present perfect progressive works much better depending on the speaker's perspective. The present perfect is particularly preferred when there is a specific...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

She always lets me down . OR She always is letting me down

Please help. What is correct way ?Read More...
Hello, Nastassia, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. When you ask questions here concerning example sentences, please include the example sentences in the body of your post, so that readers do not have to refer to the title in order to understand your question. Thank you. Both sentences are correct, though you have "always" in an awkward place in "She always is letting me down." You should place "always" after "is" (the auxiliary verb): "She is always letting me down." There is a...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

accustomed to swearing

1) He is accustomed to swearing. Is that sentence ambiguous? a) He is in the habit of swearing. b) He is used to hearing people swear. How about: 2) He is accustomed to swearing at linguists. I think sense "a" is the one that more readily comes to mind, but he might be in a select company that swear furiously at linguists constantly and he is merrily accustomed to such swearing. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, David, Now, I have another problem! (2a) ?? Swearing at linguists is (not) something he is accustomed to. Can't that mean the same as your '2b'? Can't one say: 3) Having a nap in the afternoon is something he is accustomed to. Do we have to have the 'doing' there? And, if I undersand it correctly 4) He is accustomed to swearing vociferously. is unambiguous while 5) He is accustomed to vociferous swearing. is not. Is that correct? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

Deleted

DeletedRead More...
Yes. Unlike "wanted," which can point to the future within the past ( he wanted to have a meeting/meetings ), "liked" expresses a habitual past, and then "so he could not bear to listen" could only be used to express result. This is another possible sentence: - Jim didn't like long meetings so (as a result) he left in the middle of the boring presentation. Note 1: couldn't bear can also be followed by V-ing ( couldn't bear listening to... ) Note 2: Your comment further above should have been...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

have built, have been building

Hello. Which one is correct? Why? - They.........this school for two years now. a) have built b) have been building Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmedβ€”Only (b) is correct. "For two years now" tells you that the action of building this school is ongoing. The progressive is needed to show that the action has not been completed.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Sentence structure

Hello, Grammar Exchange members! I've run into the following sentence while reading a book titled "The Individual Subject and Scientific Psychology." What I don't understand about the sentence is the bolded part. 1. Successful application of the basic knowledge of psychology in particular concrete situations β€” be those situations examples of individual or group psychotherapy, of consultation in a business firm, or of dealing with a troubled adolescent β€” can be consistent only if the basic...Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo. Great help!Read More...
Last Reply By KDog · First Unread Post

Can a sentence be "simple complex"?

I've run into multiple definitions of simple, complex, and compound. According to some online sources, a simple sentence has only one independent clause (but they don't say anything about dependent clauses.) These sites state that a sentence with one dependent and one independent clause is a 'simple complex sentence. Other online sources state that a simple sentence must have only one clause that is independent. According to these sources, a complex sentence is not ever a simple sentence,...Read More...
I agree this makes far more sense. I do not like the dichotomy of 'simple/compound'. A child should not be greatly faulted for confusing complex sentences with compound sentences when attempting to infer a relationship from the fact that 'simple' and 'complex' are antonyms. To a child, a 'simple complex sentence' is a lexical nightmare even though the concept is perfectly valid.Read More...
Last Reply By cwm9 · First Unread Post

What is the syntactical function of an interjection? (i.e., what are the names of the syntactical usages of the part of speech that is the interjection?)

Aloha, again, from Hawaii! I realize this is obscure and doesn't really hold much importance. This is mere curiosity. I'm just trying to wrap my head around some definitions to make sure I understand them. Simple definitions of a sentence suggest a sentence should have one or more independent clauses in addition to zero or more dependent clauses. There are two situations my question occurs in. First, consider: "No." This is an interjection, but 'interjection' is a part-of-speech label, not a...Read More...

Does a leading phrase that is not a clause count as part of the predicate?

Greetings, grammar experts! Consider: Under the deep blue sea, fish swam. 'Under the deep blue sea' is not a dependent clause because it has no verb and is therefore not a clause at all. It is an adverbial prepositional phrase modifying swim (I think.) Is this prepositional phrase considered part of the predicate of the sentence even though it has a comma after it? In other words, is the predicate.... "swam" or is the predicate... "Under the deep blue sea, ____ swam." Perhaps I am wrong to...Read More...
Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By cwm9 · First Unread Post

Use of an Apostrophe in a heading

Hello, I am wondering which of the following is correct with regard to the use of an apostrophe if you use Players list as a heading with the players names listed below the heading. 1. Players List 2. Player's List 3. Players' List thank youRead More...
Also, "the players' list" would likely be interpreted as "a list belonging to the players" rather than as "the list of players."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Differences

Please, would you kindly explain the difference between related to and relating to?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, Sometimes they are used interchangeably. 'Relating to' is a preposition meaning 'concerning' or 'about' . On LDOCE, you can see: - Documents relating to immigration laws. - Other particular provisions allow parents to be given special information relating to their child. 'Related to' is an adjective meaning 'connected to' or 'caused by'. - Poverty is often directly related to unemployment.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post
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