Skip to main content

December 2020

Any or anyone

Hi, which is correct please - “any of my family” or “anyone in my family”. the context is “ If I think that anyone, especially any of my family......... many thanksRead More...
Hi Gustavo, Can I please ask for some additional grammar help. I currently say " I have never wished that anyone especially any and all of my family...." should I instead say "I have never wished that anyone especially anyone and everyone in my family....."? Many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By nick · First Unread Post

Revert to you and get back to you

Hi, Are Revert to you and get back to you the same? Which one is more cool/formal? So, for example: I have been so busy, I will revert to you shortly or I will get back to you shortly.Read More...
Hi, Cristi—What part of the world are these people writing to you from? Do you or your e-mail correspondents live in India, by any chance? No one with whom I have ever corresponded uses "revert" to mean "reply." That said, the twelfth and final definition of "revert" in the Oxford English Dictionary is this:Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

What does "when" refer to in "since when"

- The book was written in 1955, since when the education system has witnessed great changes. What does "when" refer to? Is it the year 1955, or the exact moment the book was written? Or maybe both interpretations are about the same and there is no need to distinguish one from the other. Thanks in advance.Read More...
This is the part that I didn't know. I always considered the fact that the time expression is not obligatory in that construction as indicating that "which time" refers to something else, something that could be found in any cases, which, unfortunately, turned out to be untrue.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

It’s so fun

I recently watched NBA and heard the commentator say “It’s so fun watching players evolve.” Is it common to use “fun” as an adjective this way? I’ve always believed that “fun” is only a noun and that “It’s so much fun” is much more commonly heard. The dictionaries say “fun” can be an adjective; if so, “it’s so fun” or “it’s very fun” should be grammatically fine, but they just sound weird to me.Read More...
Thanks Gustavo. It’s an eye-opening reserve.Read More...
Last Reply By Kinto · First Unread Post

Down another half point

For a sentence something like “ The company was down another half point yesterday”, I took it as “the stock price of the company was down half a percentage point again yesterday”. Am I right?Read More...
>For stocks, one point equals one dollar. Thank very much for the information.Read More...
Last Reply By ken · First Unread Post

I 'have been repairing/have repaired/repaired/was repairing'.......

Suppose, after spending all day repairing my motorbike I go to a cafe to meet my friend. I am looking so tired. So, my friend asks me why I am looking tired. When he asks me that, with which of the following sentences I should reply to him? I mean which tense I should use. 1- I am tired because I have been repairing my motorbike all day. 2- I am tired because I have repaired my motorbike all day. 3- I am tired because I repaired my motorbike all day. 4- I am tired because I was repairing my...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—In that context, the present perfect progressive is the most natural choice: "I am tired because I have been repairing my motorbike all day." You can also say: "I am tired because I spent all day repairing my motorbike."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Phrase or clause

Hi, Could anyone help answer the question whether the end of the following sentences is a phrase or a clause? The dog barked at the postman, unconcerned by its master's please for silence. An explanation would be great too! Many thanksRead More...
Hello, Laverinio, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Where have you taken this sentence from? Please refer to Guidelines (4) and (5), to which there is a link in the toolbar at the top of the page. Thank you. "Please" is an interjection, so my first guess is that it should be between quotes to indicate what the dog's master actually said.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Falls/Pours

In Egypt, the rain _____ mostly near the northern coast. A. drops B. fills C. falls D. pours Can I know the explanation behind the answer?Read More...
Hello, Englishnerd and Ahmed—I agree with you, Ahmed, that "falls" is the best choice of the four. ("Fills" doesn't work at all; "pours" and "drops" are rather silly.) Most English speakers would phrase the sentence differently, so that "rain" is a verb, not a noun, and weather "it" is subject. Another option is to use "rain" as a noun but have expletive "there" as the grammatical subject. In Egypt, it rains mostly near the northern coast. In Egypt, there is rain mostly near the northern coast.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Direct and Indirect Speech

Hello, When writing up an email, should we use direct speech or indirectly speech. For example: I contacted Mary advising her that I have made the payment to the company's bank account. Mary told me as soon as the money hits the account, she will provide me the receipts and send me the parcel. Now, I need to relay this back to my manager. So do I use direct or indirect speech. so, here is my email --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Dear Boss, I just...Read More...
Hi, Cristi, Not only the subject pronouns, but the object, possessive and reflexive pronouns as well. No, 'that' is not a relative clause here. Yes, you are right. No, isn't. It is simply a simple sentence containing one subject and one verb. There are no relative pronouns here. If you use the search button above, you can find a lot of information about relative pronouns and how they are used.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

See a movie

Foteini
I would like to ask if the following sentence is correct: ”all the Christmas movies you want to see” i thought that we can only say watch a movieRead More...
Hello, Foteini—"All the Christmas movies you want to see" is not a sentence. It's a noun phrase in which "(that) you want to see" is a relative clause. An example of a sentence containing your noun phrase is this: " You can see all the movies you want to see ." It is perfectly fine to speak of seeing movies, as well as of watching them. Have you seen Star Wars ?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the angels

Tom says: Who is that guy communicating with. Jack replies: Angels. Can one tell if according to Jack, that guy is communicating with some angels or with all of them ? I think ' the angels' would mean all of them (or all that are present, have been mentioned, etc.), but 'angels' on its own seems to imply that he is talking to some of them. Could it mean he's talking to all of them? Note: Jack is an imaginary character of mine who really believes in angels. He really believes that that guy is...Read More...
Thank you very much, David, I get it, but if one uses 'the angels' instead of 'angels', that would would mean all of them, unless a specific set of angels has been defined, in which case 'the angels' would refer to that set. Is that correct? For example, if we have: Well, you see. There are angels in this room and he is talking to the angels. then 'the angels' would refer to all the angels in the room. But if we only have 'He's talking to angels.' then the meaning would be he is talking to...Read More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

what does this content clause modify?

Tiffany shareholders are expected this week to approve a merger with French luxury giant LVMH that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement . -- from a headline on the front page of Today's WSJ. I think the above clause in italic is a content clause. What does it modify? The whole part before it (Tiffany ... LVMH) or just the word "merger"? Please comment.Read More...
I agree that the relative clause modifies "merger," but it may also be said to modify the noun phrase "merger with French luxury giant LVMH" as a whole. The noun phrase headed by "merger" has a prepositional phrase adjunct/modifier ("with French luxury giant LVMH") and a relative clause adjunct/modifier ("that would close months of drama that nearly killed the $15.8 billion agreement"). The second adjunct overlaps the first rather than operating wholly independently of it. BTW, Jason, please...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Usage of prepositional phrases

The coronavirus pandemic worsened existing pressures on tuition and auxiliary revenue, with international students opting to study outside the U.S. and money from room and board drying up as schools keep classes online. What is the function of this prepositional phrase "with international ... classes online"? When do you use it? Why does it start with "with"? Please comment.Read More...
Thanks, David! The sentence is from a WSJ article on Dec 28 by Juliet Chung and Melissa Korn.Read More...
Last Reply By JasonHouston · First Unread Post

What colour

I have come across this sentence which was said to be correct: What is you favorite color of car? A native speaker provided it. Do you agree that it's correct? Why is this one not correct? What is you favorite color of a car?Read More...
Thank you. Actually, I think type of a woman is possible. I heard that it can be used for a sarcastic remark. What kind of a woman is she? (Is she even a woman, agh?)Read More...
Last Reply By Me_IV · First Unread Post

The function of this infinitive phrase

Launching an air travel service when the COVID-19 pandemic has decimated commercial aviation is ambitious, to put it charitably. What is the function of this infinitive phrase "to put it charitably"? Does it function as an adverb? If yes, what does it modify? Can anyone elaborate?Read More...
Hi, Jason, Actually, it is a sentence modifier. Under item 8.126 on page 618 of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language , Quirk et al refer to this kind of modifiers as "metalinguistic comments," that is, expressions that refer to the way how things are said rather than to the actual message that is being conveyed. Other metalinguistic comments are strictly/broadly speaking, so to say, literally.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

twice

Is this sentence correct ? It is twice this month I have seen you .Read More...
Hi, Ilko, Though grammatically correct, I think the use of the cleft sentence would only be justified if some emphasis were required. Also, I think "this month" would sound more natural at the end: A: You've only seen me once this month. B: It's not just once but twice that I've you seen you this month.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

So Much For

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Since the equipment never arrived so much for using it properly. 2. Since the equipment never arrived so much for proper usage. 3. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery to the next prospective recipient. 4. As the letter in question was never received by this office so much for its delivery. Are "1", "2", and "3" correct? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot, Gustavo, for taking so much trouble to drive home the point. I am sincerely thankful to you, and, to David, of course.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Help

Is this sentence correct ? Could you help me off the couch .Read More...
Hi, Ilko, Yes, the sentence: is correct as a polite request provided you close it with a question mark. The verb help , just like other verbs like walk and drive , can take the pattern: Verb + DO + adverbial particle/prepositional phrase to indicate that somebody helps/walks/drives somebody else to get or go somewhere. This is, in my opinion, a remarkable example of the economy that characterizes the English language.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

"must" in reported speech

Hello.Could you help me choose the correct answer in the attachment? Please Explain why. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, 5) Changing 'now' to 'then' leads to 'had to'. 6) Changing 'tomorrow' to 'the following day' leads to 'would have to'. 7) Not changing 'now' means there is no need to use time backshift, so "must" is the best choice. 8) It is similar to 7, but there are two possible answers: 'must' and 'wil have to'. Mostly, the model answer will be 'will have to' because it is preferred, especially when talking about obligations at a particular point in the futureRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Was or Were?

I know there are better ways of writing this sentence that would make it much easier to understand, however, is there a correct answer to whether or not to use "was" versus "were" in this particular example sentence? "The total drinks that I consumed during the night was seven." or "The total drinks that I consumed during the night were seven." I want to say that "was" sounds more natural to me (for whatever possibly illiterate reason), however, if "drinks" is the subject, it seems like it...Read More...
Hello, Gary, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. It sounds more natural to you because, as you indicated in your post, the singular noun "number" is missing.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Bank statement vs bank statements

Hi, If we refer to bank statement of a different accounts, should I use bank statement or bank statements? e.g. the total interest expenses of $15,000 were reflected in the bank statements of the following accounts: a. Account number #1234 b. Account number #9999Read More...
Yes, you can use: - The total interest expenses of $15,000 were reflected in the bank statement s of the following account s : a. Account number #1234 b. Account number #9999 (two bank account s ⇒ two statement s ) or - The total interest expenses of $15,000 were reflected in the bank statement of each of the following account s : a. Account number #1234 b. Account number #9999 (each bank account has its statement)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×