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April 2022

on vs when

hi, how can we differentiate between (on) and (when) followed by a gerund..Read More...
Hi, Ibrahim Elmasery, and 'Happy Eid Al-Fitr', 'On' is a preposition that refers to a particular point in time , while ' when' is a conjunction or a time adverbial and its meaning depends on the way you are using it. - When / On seeing a snake, I feel frightened. (This is a regular action, so 'when' sounds the natural one to use). = Every time / Whenever I see a snake, I feel frightened. - On / When seeing the snake, I felt frightened. (This is a unique action, so both are OK .)Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Does "furthermore" come after "also"?

Consider this sequence: your efficacy can increase when you “hear or see or learn about what the real solutions look like” your efficacy can also increase when you “see someone else do something” your efficacy can furthermore increase when you “find out about something you can do”—or even something that you’ve “already done”—in your personal life” So it's "can increase", "can also increase", and "can furthermore increase". Is that the right sequence or should I change it?Read More...
Hi, Andrew, I see nothing wrong with this sequence. However, I think that using 'furthermore' in an initial position (in your third sequence) may sound more natural. Furthermore, your efficacy can increase when you “find out about something you can do”—or even something that you’ve “already done”—in your personal life”Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Date or dated

Should I use date or dated in the below sentence. Please kindly review, sign and date/dated where indicated if you are agreeable with the figures contain therein.Read More...
Hi, Tony -- I agree with Ahmed about "date" and would like to point out that your "if"-clause in the sentence you asked about is ungrammatical. You seem to be trying to say "if the figures contained therein are agreeable to you" or "if you find the figures contained therein agreeable" or "if you agree to the figures contained therein."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Must/have to

Hi, I'm a student and my teacher gave me an exercise. There's this sentence She........wear a uniform at her school. I have to fill in the blank with have to, must or doesn't have to. Could 'must' be okay? She must wear a uniform at her school, is that correct? Thanx!Read More...
👍🏻 Okay, thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By Ap · First Unread Post

What tense should I use on the bold?

https://join.substack.com/p/will-we-end-ourselves that “older generations” have “betrayed” them that the “leaders” who made decisions in the past have “betrayed” them So there are three tricky spots to determine: (1) have "betrayed" (2) who made (3) have "betrayed" them On (1), I'm relatively confident that it's good as is, but I'm not 100% sure. On (2), I have no idea if it should be "who've made" or "who made". On (3), I have no idea whether the "have" should be deleted. Thanks so much!Read More...
Hi, Andrew, 1 & 2 are OK. Concerning 3, I don't like it. I would list it as follows: It’s striking to read that people feel: "betrayed" by the decision-makers in the past.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Is it OK for me to use "remarkably" and "really" together here? It seems potentially redundant.

See in bold: https://join.substack.com/p/will-we-end-ourselves The war in Ukraine drives home why we really do have to worry that global heating will bring everything down—take a look at how remarkably interconnected our world really isRead More...
Sorry about that! I thought that it was a loophole where you could let midnight pass and then ask more questions; my mistake and I apologize.Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

Position of pronoun objects in Phrasal Verbs

Hello GE members, There is this thing that I've been thinking about for a couple of months now. I am a bit stuck and need your help. As you may know, when the object of a phrasal verb is a pronoun, it is placed before the particle. For example, we say " Pick it up" not" Pick up it ❌". I was wondering why this is the case whenever the object is a pronoun for ages now, and I think it has something to do with the " End-focus" principle. Quote: End focus “is based on the general fact that...Read More...
Hello again, I found a post by Scott Thornbury that talked about almost the same thing. However, I'm still confused.Read More...
Last Reply By Boroj Nouri · First Unread Post

Tenses and usage

hi again and another question: What is the difference between “I am confused “and the phrase “I am confusing”...(or any other verb after ” to be”) I want to know how these phrases could be used in different sentences, which tenses and why?Read More...
Hi David and thanks for your mention✌️ I have also another question : The difference between these two structures : 1. if I had gotten back in past, I would have done it again And 2. if I went back in time, I would do it again. I would be grateful if you correct all my grammatical mistakes not just my certain question.🙏Read More...
Last Reply By Mahboob · First Unread Post

Objects

Does the following sentence have five objects? Is it possible to have more than two or three objects in a sentence? 'Gently caressing her arm and listening to her weeping, Simon read the letter to his wife.'Read More...
I thought he did. That it's an object of the preposition "to", and not the verb "read", is not debatable.Read More...
Last Reply By billj · First Unread Post

How many times do you use "that"

When I make a sentence, I ofen use "that" again and again. For example," I think that he said that he felt that he was tired". It's too difficult to read. What should I do to improve my bad habit?Read More...
Hi, David. I can improve my sentences owing to you. However, I have got one more question. For instance, " I'm so tired that I can't do anything." Is the "that" optional, too?Read More...
Last Reply By nagy · First Unread Post

since + present perfect or past simple

Hello Moderators. Could you please tell me if the following sentence correct using "since + past simple"? - My friend has had a health problem since he lived in that highly polluted area. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed We use the Past tense after “since” when we refer to a point in time in the past, and we use the Present Perfect after “since” when we refer to a period of time from the past until the present. In your example above, both Past Simple and Present Perfect are possible.Read More...
Last Reply By Dr Ahmed · First Unread Post

Adverbial clause structure

Hello, Once explorers had circumnavigated the world in the 1500s providing that the Earth was round and the the other countries could be reached by ship, traders and travelers still had this problem: routes weren2t always very convenient. As far as I know; we can use once+sentence, sentence But also, providing that means (=) if How can I think of this sentence structure? Best regardsRead More...
Hello David Thank you very much for your clarificationRead More...
Last Reply By Erdal K. · First Unread Post

Syntax; Global warming is to do with carbon dioxide.

Hello! I am thinking about the syntax of the sentence "Global warming is to do with carbon dioxide". "global warming" should be the subject. "is" should be the verb. Is "to do with carbon dioxide" the modifier? If I refer to the sentence "Global warming has to do with carbon dioxide", "to do with carbon dioxide" should be modifier. Thank you for your advice. MikaRead More...

Are these meanings correct

Dir sirs, I have read those two pairs. The meaning is perplexing for me. What's your answer, please? 1) It's a free-smoking area. I think: smoking here is allowed. 2) It's a smoking-free area. I think: smoking is not allowed. 3) It's a free-weekend holiday. I think: it's a weekend holiday without plans. 4) It's a weekend-free holiday. I think: it is a weekend for which I won't have to pay moneyRead More...
That's a strange sentence. An area for people to smoke in is a smoking area. That's another strange sentence. I think you are trying to say "smoke-free area." Those are even stranger sentences. What is it that you are trying to say?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Allowed or allowable

Should I use the word "Allowed" or "Allowable" for the sentence below. Please nominate either of you for the following roles as only 1 person is allowed/allowable Company Secretary ..... Head of HRM .....Read More...
Hi, Tony—I agree with Ahmed. "Only one person is allowed" is the passive of "We only allow one person."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Am I right or not?

Hi sirs, I have come across the following sentence in " Oxford Practice Grammer unit 20 page 46 " Sara and I had been to the party the evening before. So I think the following two pairs are correct. 1) I have met that boy before. Here the period of time is undefined. 2) I had met Sara two months before. Here the period of time is defined. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hello, Basant—Yes, both of your example sentences are grammatically correct. Regarding your past-perfect example, please note that it is also possible to say, "I had met Sara before," where the exact time is undefined.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Imagine Or Am imagining?

Hi sirs, I have come across this sentence: My holiday's next week. I ( imagine - am imagining) my self on the beach night now. I think the answer is " am imagining" , though I know that "imagine" is a stative verb. It's like: "I am enjoying this party" ( Oxford Practice Grammer unit 7 ) We can use some stative verbs in the continuous to talk about a short period of time. _ This trip is costing me a lot of money. Really appreciatedRead More...
Hi, Basant Al-Sayed, 'Imagine' is not used in the progressive tenses when it means ' think ' or ' believe ' without having a proof. However, when it means forming a picture or idea in your mind, it is dynamic . - That is not possible. You must be imagining things. - I imagined that nothing would stop him.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Grammar Help

She can run faster than ______ student in the school. It can be either any or any other. Which one is correct?Read More...
Hi, Kwood, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, 'Grammar help' is not a good title. The title should be related to the issue you want to discuss. You can read our guidelines above. You can find the answer to your question here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...an-any-other-student " When you use "other" , it means that you are comparing that person to others in the same category . If the person isn't in that category, you can't use "other."Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Upward(s?) percolation

Hello, Please have a look at the picture below. I want to know if that is a typo. Upwards is a adverb; it is the adjective form upward that should be used, I think.Read More...
The entry Robby zhu drew a box around is not even the only use of " upwards percolation " in that image. The same phrase is found on the line right below it. If it was a typo, they made it twice in a row on the same page! The great Joseph Emonds used the phrase, too, in A Unified Theory of Syntactic Categories ( here ).Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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