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Use of Quotes

David, Moderator
Our Policy on the Use of Quotations We understand that members occasionally desire or need to ask grammar-related questions about sentences or phrases that were written by others, and it is perfectly acceptable for you to do so. However, if you wish to include sentences or phrases in a post that were not originally written by you, you must do two things: 1) You must show punctuationally that they are not your words. 2) You must cite what you have taken the text from. The easiest way to...Read More...

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booklet, pamphlet, brochure, leaflet

Could you help me please? I'm really confused about how to differentiate between : booklet, pamphlet, brochure, leaflet. I have looked them in many dictionaries as well as collocations dictionaries but in vain. For example, I cannot choose the correct word in the following sentence: I have a (booklet, pamphlet, brochure, leaflet) for the exam. It contains a few pages. Thank you.Read More...
Possibly the term you're looking for is 'test paper'. I have a test paper for the exam. It contains a few pages. ~ ~ ~ Example sentences below are from > https://eng.ichacha.net/zaoju/test%20paper.html The Entrance Test Paper will have 175 Objective Type Questions with Multiple Choice Answers. In exams, test papers are university entrance questions. ~ ~ ~ Definitions are from > https://www.thefreedictionary.com/test+paper test paper Also found in: Thesaurus , Medical , Legal ,...Read More...
Last Reply By Erudite_Birdy · First Unread Post

very much a...

Hi, What is the difference between 'He is a loner' and 'He is very much a loner'? Thanks.Read More...
Hi David Does it sound natural to use 'out-and-out' instead of 'very much' in your example? A: Is he a loner? B: Oh, yes! He is an out-and-out loner. Is there any difference between out-and-out and very much something? Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By kuen · First Unread Post

Past Cont vs Past Perfect Cont,

Someone next door ................... heavy metal music all night long. I didn’t get a wink of sleep. a) was playing b) has played c)had been playing d) has been playing I think that 'c' is the answer but 'a' is also possible. From one of the mock exams in Egypt.Read More...
Ahmed_btm (and to this day I still have no idea what "btm" means) wrote: My dear friend Ahmed, I believe you meant to write " whom we miss on this forum", and for what it's worth, the name is DocV, not DOCV. There still appear to be formatting issues that are beyond David's control, or mine. I apologize to you, sir, and to my dear friend David, and to Gustavo, and to certain other members. Tara certainly comes to mind. There are others. I say to you all, I beg your pardon. Some of you might...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

My way or the highway

Is the sentence/phrase "(it´s) my way or the highway" some kind of expression? What does it mean? Where does it originally come from? Thanks! Gisele São Paulo BrazilRead More...
It may have become popular from 1975 onward due to this song. Song: My Way or Hit the Highway Artist: Jill 'Baby' Love Label: Black Magic ‎– BM 116 Format: Vinyl , 7", 45 RPM, Single Country: UK Released: 1975 Youtube Video > My Way or Hit the Highway, by Jill 'Baby' Love > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shedRHSLNNM Youtube Video > My Way, by Limp Bizkit, uses this same phrase and this song was released in 2000 _* Note* Song has vastly different lyrics than the one above > ...Read More...
Last Reply By Erudite_Birdy · First Unread Post

will or going to

Hi, teachers. I'd like to know your opinion concerning sentences like this one. He studies hard. He "will pass _ is going to pass" . He doesn't study. He "won't pass _ isn't going to pass" . I found many references supporting " will ". Longman's editor, Edmond Murphy and other websites. However, I had some argument with some people arguing for " be going to ", while others choose "both options". So, could you kindly tell me what to choose?Read More...
@Hussein Hassan , thanks a million.Read More...
Last Reply By ayman · First Unread Post

seems like (as if)?

Hello! 1. He seems to be happy. 2. It seems that he is happy. (formal style) 3. It seems like ( as if ) he is happy. (informal style) In sentence 2 and 3, I assume that; 1) the conjunctions - ' that ' and ' like ', ' as if' in informal style - lead not a subject complement but a real subject clause (that is, impersonal subject + complete intransitive verb + real subject clause). 2) ' seems ' is justified to function as an complete intransitive verb , which leads a real subject clause.Read More...

Is it wrong to omit the conjunction "and"?

Last week, I made up three sentences for my non-native English speaking friends to comment on. I have written them below. (1a) This is an interesting, exciting story. (2a) He is a reliable, dedicated employee. (3a) The couple has a happy, healthy relationship. My friends said the sentences sound wrong without the conjunction. So, they revised them to make the sentences below. (1b) This is an interesting and exciting story. (2b) He is a reliable and dedicated employee. (3b) The couple has a...Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Yes, all six sentences are perfectly correct. Moreover, the sentences your friends said sound wrong sound perfectly fine.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

... (he) suffered from many ....

I have made up a sentence below. (1a) He was weak and throughout his adult life suffered from many illnesses. My friends think I need "he" after "life". (1b) He was weak and throughout his adult life he suffered from many illnesses. Do I need "he" there? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Both (1a) and (1b) are correct. You can add "he" after "life" or not. It's your choice. The sentence is correct either way. Sentence (1a) has one independent clause, and (1b) has two. Sentence (1a) is the following sentence with the "throughout"-phrase re-positioned: (1a') He was weak and suffered from many illnesses throughout his adult life. As you can see, "throughout his adult life" is adverbial modifying the verb phrase "suffered from many illnesses." It modifies that verb...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Whose

Hi everyone First of all happy easter to everyone Are those sentences correct? I have a friend whose car we need. Or I have a friend whose car we are in need of. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Hs12. Welcome to the Grammar Exchange and Happy Easter! Generally, "those" refers to things that come before. It would have been better to say, "Are these sentences correct?," because you are talking about sentences that you are about to mention. The example sentences you have written are very strange, but they are grammatically correct. What context do you have in mind for them? Here are more natural sentences: I have a friend whose car needs gas. I have a friend whose car is in need...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

A variety or number

Hello, "There are a..............of departments for the students to choose from." A- number b- variety I think (number) because of the plural verb (are).Read More...

The All Other

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. The all inclusive system soon gave way to a new one. 2. All other systems soon gave way to the new one. 3. The all other systems soon gave way to the new one. I hope (1) and (2) are fine. I think (3) is incorrect. Can someone help me understand what makes (1) different from (3) ? Thanks. PS to David: God willing, I will soon return to the other open thread. I need to do a little reading there.Read More...
Hi, Gustavo, I see my folly now. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

of the same size or the same size

Hello there I'd like to know if it's correct to say : 1. The two products are of the same size. 2. The two products are the same size. 3. The two products have the same size. 4. The two products are of different sizes. 5. The two products are in different sizes. 6. The two products have different sizes. Thanks a lot. Happy Easter :DRead More...
Thanks a lot David and GustavoRead More...
Last Reply By taiman · First Unread Post

just as I played the guitar

a. As I played the guitar, he played the piano. b. Just as I played the guitar, he played the piano. c. He played the piano as I played the guitar. d. He played the piano just as I played the guitar. e. He played the piano as I played the guitar. f. He played the piano just as I played the guitar. Which of the above correspond to which of the below: 1. He played the piano while I played the guitar. 2. He played the piano and I played the guitar. 3. He played the piano because I played the...Read More...
Hi, Azz, Here is my solution set. Please note that (e) and (f) repeat (c) and (d), respectively. (a) --> (1) and (3), and (4) at a stretch (b) --> (2) and (4), and (1) at a stretch (c)/(e) and (d)/(f) --> (1) and (4)Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

so did he

a. As his father played tennis, so did he. b. Just as his father played tennis, so did he. Do these mean 1. His father played tennis and so did he . 2. He played tennis in the same way his father played tennis. 3. He played tennis because his father did. 4. He played tennis at the same time as his father did. Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, Sentence (a) can mean (2), (3), or (4). It is context that will make the difference. Sentence (b) can mean (1). For meaning (2), however, you could say: (2b) He played tennis just as his father did.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

what has happened vs happened

A: Oh, You have some bruises on your face. _____? B: Richard hit me. 1) What has happened 2) What happened Which one is better?Read More...
I agree that Swan's advice there provides no justification for using the present perfect in the answer to the quiz question you have presented. The speaker comments on the bruises. That something has happened which caused the bruises is part of the context. The speaker is wondering what happened .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

phrasal verbs with fall

Hello all. Can you give me some examples to illustrate the difference between fall down and fall through? Can "a plan falls down" as in the sentence below: All his plans to start his own business fell down (1) Is it better if I replace "fell down" with "fell through"? I am quite puzzled because they have almost the same meaning in some dictionaries. Among its three meanings given, fall down has a meaning as "to fail" as in - Where do you think the plan falls down? (2) As for fall through, it...Read More...
Hello, Quangco123, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Phrasal verbs don't need to be mutually exclusive. In fact, some of them are similar in meaning and can be used in the same sentences. Let's compare some examples with "fall down" and "fall through" from the Corpus: - Technically he is excellent but you have noticed that he is falling down on the supervisory aspects of his job. - The attorney general is supposed to act only when the law enforcement is falling down or broken down in a...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Than whom

Hi guys. Is it correct to say : I have a friend than whom my father speaks English better as in : I have a friend who speaks English My father speaks English better than my friendRead More...
Hello, HS12, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Your sentence: is totally ungrammatical. "than" needs to appear after the adjective in comparative degree. If you want to use a relative, you can choose one of these: - I have a friend whose English is not as good as my father's. - I have a friend who doesn't speak English as well as my father (does).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

comma usages

(a) You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words , as many as you can if you want to be fluent in this language. Are you OK with the above text? I am not. The following version works for me: (b) You, as a non-native English speaker , should learn English words , as many as you can , if you want to be fluent in this language. Here's my take: 1. Is it "as many as you can if you want to be fluent in this language"? This seems unlikely, because it is not true that this entire...Read More...
Grammatically speaking, it is true that "if you want to be fluent in this language" refers to "should learn English words." However, from a semantic point of view, if you take out the parenthetical "as many as you can" (which is correctly set off by commas and, being parenthetical, should allow for its elimination without a significant change of meaning), the sentence is too obvious to be good: - You, as a non-native English speaker, should learn English words if you want to be fluent in...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Relative pronouns

What is the right choice in this sentence : I'll tell you some of (which /what) he has said, but I wish you wouldn't get angry.Read More...
Hi, Emad Ragheb, "some of" is a partitive and needs to be followed by a noun phrase: some of his comments, some of his ideas, etc. "what" is a nominal relative pronoun, meaning "the things that," so that is what you need: - I'll tell you some of what (= the things that) he has said.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Oblivious clearly

Is the following sentence grammatically correct: "I'm oblivious clearly."Read More...
Hello, Hailey, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! That isn't a very kind thing to say about oneself. From a grammatical standpoint, the sentence wants a comma (or, in speech, an intonation break or slight pause) before "clearly." Alternatively, you could place "clearly" at the beginning or in the middle. It is a sentence-level adverbial modifying the proposition "I'm oblivious." It is clear that I'm oblivious. Clearly, I'm oblivious. I'm clearly oblivious. I'm oblivious, clearly.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reported Speech

He told the police that he always ……..the doors and windows to avoid being burgled. a) locks b) locked I think that both answers are correct. The first would mean that it's a habit that he still does (which makes more sense to me) and the second implies that he used to do this before reporting the theft to the police. Am I right? Thanks for helping me out.Read More...
Oh, very good, Ahmed. Thanks for clarifying. Now I fully agree with you, too.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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