May 2018

And vs. SO

Hello guys, I’m wondering if anyone here could explain to me why (C)so is incorrect in this context. I’ve wanted to read The Diary of a Young Girl for months,______ today I finally borrowed the book from the library. (A)and (B)since (C)so (D)until To me,(A) is fine, but I’ve been thinking if (C)is possible. I mean, could I interpret this whole sentence as a cause-effect relation? Or is this sentence only viewed as a linear sequence, first one action and then the other? Thanks.Read More...
I am glad to see this kind of brilliant informative post and all the details are awesome in this post.Read More...
Last Reply By alisha5050 · First Unread Post

Inversion in comparative sentence

novice
Hi, The larger the area of forest is destroyed, ....... A. the most frequent natural disasters are B. the most frequently natural disasters occur C. the more frequent are natural disasters D. the more frequently natural disasters occur Which option is the best to fill in the blank? It's obvious that D is correct, but when it comes to inversion in comparative sentences, I can't rule out the option C. Are there two equally good answer to that question?Read More...
I am reading Thomas Merton's famous autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain, and was reminded yesterday of this thread, when, in reading the book, I came upon another rare instance of a correlative comparative containing inversion in the second clause. This example more closely resembles Novice's (c) than does the Uncle Tom's Cabin example I gave above, since the clause in question uses "be," it contains "the more," and "the more" modifies an adjective. Actually, "the more" modifies three...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Determiners and Adjectives

Is there a definitive, or close to a definitive, decision about whether or not determiners are a subcategory of adjectives? I was taught that articles are adjectives and that some pronouns FUNCTION as adjectives. But now I read that articles and some pronouns, as well as some quantifies, are all determiners, but NOT adjectives!Read More...
Gustavo, You're right, of course. And after more careful thought, it becomes obvious to me that "better" can't be a determiner, since, if "men" were changed to the singular "man", an actual determiner would still be needed: *Better man has challenged me. (wrong) The better man has challenged me. (right) One better man has challenged me. (right) No better man has challenged me. (right) DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

"He told me his name was" VS "He told me his name is"

When considering the following example: "I met a man yesterday. His name is John" I understand the idea behind using "is" instead of "was" - here, arguably, the condition is permanent (somebody's name does not change and is true for all times, rather than a specific time). However, when considering the following sentence: "I met a man yesterday and he told me that his name was/is John" The past tense seems like a more sensible/fluid option. Many study materials (specifically, for the GMAT...Read More...
Thanks againRead More...
Last Reply By Alsawwah · First Unread Post

Clean / Cleaned?

Which is correct? I could get the toilet clean / cleaned. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks for telling me my thread before. Btw, It's not very convenient to look back the previous threads. Could you please try to "squeeze" all the previous threads in "personal activities stream" ? Just as like the old version that we can find the threads page by page. Thanks. it's my point of view. Hopefully it'll be useful in future.Read More...
Last Reply By bearbear · First Unread Post

That/,That

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Which one of the following is/are correct, and why or how? 1. Notice is hereby given that none shall trade with XYZ from this day onward. 2. Notice is hereby given, that none shall trade with XYZ from this day onward. Thanks.Read More...
DocV, I am sincerely sorry for the loss you have suffered. I have met similar fate and it took me four years to get my bearings.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

If

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following is from a Youtube documentary titled, History’s Mysteries: Bigfoot and other monsters. It appears within the first minute (and later on again). Link What does the ‘qualified if’ mean? Thanks. PS: I know it is not a strictly grammatical question but one pertaining to usage, yet I need an answer. Kindly consider my request.Read More...
Hi, DocV, It is really nice to hear from you once again, on the new platform. I wonder how I missed to use the quotation marks. Thanks a lot for all that you pointed out in your post, e.g., the misuse of 'real'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

outlet/output

novice
Hi, It's me again. Could you help me to find the word opposite in meaning to "access" in this sentence? The only means of access to the station is through a dark subway. A. arrival B. admission C. outlet D. outputRead More...
Ahmad, As you say: 'Egress' is also an option; however, I am not so sure if it is that commonly used. Phineas Taylor Barnum, a United States politician and showman of the nineteenth century, used to have sideshows at his circuses where various "freaks of nature" and other rarities were shown. There would always be a corridor specially lit up, pointing out where people could go to see the Egress. Since no one had ever seen an Egress before, people would flock to that door, only to find...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

turn on/ turn up

novice
Hi, You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle. A. turned on B. taken up C. turned up D. taken on When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D. Take up st means beginning or starting st such as a job Take on sb/st means deciding to do st or being agree to be responsible for sb/st Which one is the best appropriate in this situation? and What is the difference between take on and take up? Thank you.Read More...
Re: turn on/ turn upRead More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

controversy/controversies

novice
Hi, Controversy is both countable and uncountable noun but I can't find any example with "controversies" in Oxford Dictionary (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/controversy) Would you be kind to provide some example with "controversies" and tell the difference between controversy and controversies?Read More...
Thank you for putting your heart into your unpaid work like that. ♥Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

pose

novice
Hi, When posed with a complicated mathematical equation, some students seek the assistance of a teacher. A. solved B. presented C. informed D. spaced The given answer is B. However, I suspect that the question is incorrect because something such as a question/a threat/a challenge can be posed but we can't pose a someone. Am I wrong? Thank you.Read More...
Hi David: I forgot to tell you that I had to find a word that has the similar meaning to "posed" from four options. I can't show my gratitude to you because through your explanation, I seem to learn more things than what I ask about.Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

How to ask for help and thank somebody politely

novice
Hi, Could you please suggest some ways to ask for help and thank somebody politely? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, David. When I want to ask someone for help formally and politely (most often in this forum), I often use some structures as below: - Would/Could you do something? - Would you mind doing something? - Would you be kind to do something? When I want to express my gratitude to someone, I often use: - Thank you very much for your help/kindness/explanation - I appreciate your help - It's kind of you to help me. - Many thanks to you. But when I ask too many questions, it seems a little bit...Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

Nouns

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Worries are likely to increase under such circumstances. 2. Crimes are likely to increase under such circumstances. 3. Criminals are likely to increase under such circumstances. 4. The number of criminals is likely to increase under such circumstances. 5. The number of worries is likely to increase under such circumstances. I believe ‘3’ is outright incorrect unless ‘increase’ is post modified (which would change the meaning drastically). If I am correct, what explains...Read More...
Hi, Ahmad, I agree with you that (3) is incorrect unless "increase" is post-modified. But if you post-modify it with the prepositional phrase "in number," the meaning will not change drastically. Indeed, the semantics will be parallel to that of the others: (3a) Criminals are likely to increase in number in such circumstances. Or you could say: " There is likely to be an increase in the number of criminals under such circumstances ." I prefer that. I even like (4) better than (3a). My point...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Comma/No Comma

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following is from A DICTIONARY OF PHILOSOPHICAL LOGIC by Roy T. Cook . The comma after ‘property’ seems wrong to me. My reason for that is that if I come up with a sentence of the same structure, however shorter in length, it won’t require a comma. For instance, 1. His journey from being an average student to a brilliant one was short. Thanks. PS: By the way, do I need to set off the part 'from ....one' in commas?Read More...
David, Thanks a lot for the clarification. That is great and, of course, abundantly apparent. PS: Since DocV and Gustavo don't seem to have any interest in decorations, it is time I took the opportunity myself. ♠Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Adverb Position

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. It is deceptively simple. 2. Deceptively, it is simple. I believe '1' means something like this: The thing/process etc., seems simple, but that is not so. The apparent is deceptive. Does '2' mean this: When viewed from a vantage point of deception, the thing seems simple, which it is not. But if that is the case (in '2'), won't that be more like self-deception than deception? Can some correct me here, because I am surely missing something crucial here? Thanks.Read More...
No need for that, sir. I don't think I should inconvenience you with that. I am immensely indebted to you for all the efforts you put in to keep this forum alive. Answering such a myriad of questions sun to sun is something to be respected for the nobility inherent to it. Sir, I thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Mile or Miles?

I use this phrase often in reports I write during my work day. I won't tell you which I use, but I would like the answer, if you don't mind: The sign was 0.05 mile from the house. or The sign was 0.05 miles from the house. I look forward to your replies. Thanks! PaulRead More...
I respect your opinion. You don't actually say it, but I assume you mean to imply that you think "0.05 mile" in a sentence like "The sign was 0.05 mile from the house" is grammatically correct. It is obviously correct when functioning attributively, as in "It is a 0.05 mile stretch of sidewalk." I think the question of the grammatical (as opposed to the mathematical ) correctness of "0.05 mile" in "The sign was 0.05 mile from the house" comes down to how "0.05 mile" is pronounced , in speech...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"A" vs "Any"

Hi there, What the difference between a and any in the following sentence? Are they both grammatical in the following sentence? Yesterday I went to a village that was so uninhabited. After a mile of walking I did not find a house/any house(s) in that area. What's difference do a house and any houses make in the sentence? And can I use any house instead of any houses in the sentence?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, I believe the questions of this sort, coming mostly from you, have already been answered in detail. I suggest you go over your earlier posts. You are stuck with 'a', 'any', and 'the', while you neglect other areas. I see many a problem with your post. You should read more than you currently do, and soon half your questions would be answered by the exercise. You can discard my advice, but that won't be advisable. Thanks. PS: Last year in October (give or take a week or two) , a...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Activities that have and have not funding

I just find the collect sentence for this: Activities that have funding or funded and activities that have not funded or funding. Thanks and looking forward to the comment.Read More...
Thanks for clarifying. You can't say "activities that have not funded," which is ungrammatical and illogical. I think you mean to refer to: activities that have not been funded activities that don't have funding activities that have no funding unfunded activitiesRead More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Can and will

1. Watch TV all day and you will be couch potato! 2. Watch TV all day and you can be couch potato! Can 2 mean the same as 1? Thanks!Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo and David! Can 2 mean both the two meanings below: 1. Okay, if you really want to be a couch potato, you can choose to watch TV all day. 2. I am warning you, if you watch TV all day, you are very likely to become a couch potato!Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

Even or No Even?

ahmad
Hello, everyone, JOHN B. COBB, JR. & DAVID RAY GRIFFIN, PROCESS THEOLOGY An Introductory Exposition When I read the sentence in bold face, I feel there should be an 'even' or 'despite' preceding 'with this one qualification'? Why am I wrong in thinking so? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, David, The absence of ‘even’ in the sentence seems to me saying that it is the qualification which makes them (the other two substances) self-sufficient. However, when I imagine an ‘even’, or for that purpose a ‘despite’, that seems to make more sense. Perhaps my interpretation, the one lacking an even , has more to do with punctuation; I am not so sure, but I have you nonetheless to help me out. Thanks. PS: I am sorry for having taken so much time to reply.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

As unique as you? or As unique as you are?

Trying to make the point about a custom home in this headline for an ad... " A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU " OR " A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU ARE " Are both grammatically correct? Which sounds better? Thanks!Read More...
Thanks, DocV. As a point of reference, I happened upon this site through a Google search and did not realize it was not appropriate to ask for advice for professional work. Didn't see that anywhere in the guidelines. Sorry to have offended you. It was never my intent to ask for free editing. I was just wondering if both were grammatically correct as stated in my original post. Thanks very much to all for weighing in. Your input was very helpful and very much appreciated.Read More...
Last Reply By chuck t · First Unread Post

Surprise or surprises?

Hello all. This is my first posting. I saw this newspaper headline recently: CABINET OF SURPRISE. The story was of a new prime minister who sprang several surprises when announcing his Cabinet line-up. Should 'surprise' in the headline be singular or plural?Read More...
Thanks for your input, DocV & DAVIDMODERATOR. I prefer "Cabinet of surprises" because of its intended meaning.Read More...
Last Reply By Yeoman · First Unread Post
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