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May 2020

if only

Hello. Which one is correct, please? - If only scientists (would discover - discovered) a cure for cancer, it would be a great breakthrough. Thank you.Read More...
Hell, Ahmed Imam Attia—Both choices are grammatically correct; however, from the standpoint of meaning, only "would discover" makes sense. If only scientists would discover a cure for cancer, it would be a great breakthrough. "If only they would" indicates that the antecedent expresses a wish that the speaker regards as unlikely to come true. If only scientists discovered a cure for cancer, it would be a great breakthrough. That sentence would make sense without "only," but "only scientists"...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

extreme height

Hello. Is the following sentence correct or there is something wrong? If so, Could you correct it please? - It was very hard for the mountaineer to climb the mountain as it is an extreme height. Thank you.Read More...
I agree with Ahmed_btm that the sentence is incorrect. I recommend using the following revision, which uses "extreme altitude " rather than "extreme height": The mountain's extreme altitude made it very hard for the mountaineer to climb the mountain.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

who met John regularly

1) I wrote to Pete, and talked to Roger, who meet John regularly. 2) I wrote to Pete, and talked to Roger, who met John regularly. Is '1' correct? Is '2' ambiguous? What does " who met John regularly" modify? "Roger" or both "Roger" and "Pete"? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—The non-restrictive relative clause in each sentence seems to refer to Roger alone, and I see no grounds for supposing that it reaches back to the previous verb phrase to refer to Pete as well. In (1), "meet" should be "meets." In (2), "who met John regularly" similarly refers to Roger, not to Roger and Pete. That said, in each sentence, the natural reference of the relative clause could be overridden with the phrase "both of whom," which would refer to both.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Sentence

Hi teachers! I was palying a game wih a random guy online and came across with this sentence: "I am not talking to you lately l, but you replied." I found the sentence wrong and decided to correct it by saying: "that should be was not." Am I correct or not?Read More...
Hi, Kyle—Could you please clarify your question? I think you intended to type "playing" rather than "palying" and "with" rather than "wih," but I'm still lost. I don't know what you mean by saying that you tried to correct the incorrect sentence "I am not talking to you lately, but you replied" by saying "that should be was not." What are the sentences that you would like to discuss? Also, what is the context?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Dare

I want to know if this statement is correct or not, please. I dare you go and kiss him.Read More...
Hi, About Hamza, Here, 'dare' is a full transitive verb and means 'challenge', so it must be followed by 'to'. That says, your sentence should be: I dare you to go and kiss him.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Can or shall

Dears, What is the difference between can and shall ? Thanks so much and regards, TonioRead More...
Hi, Tonio, and welcome to Grammar Exchange, Both are modal auxiliary verbs, but are quite different. a) In British English, 'shall' can replace 'will', indicating the future, when used with the pronouns I and we. 'Shall' is unusual in American English. Michael Swan, 3rd edition, page (186) says: "Will and shall are also used to express our intentions and attitudes towards other people: they are common in offers, requests, threats, promises and announcements of decisions." b) 'Can' is used to...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Relative clause

Hi. From: https://www.newscientist.com/a...sease-in-your-voice/ Is this sentence too colloquial to be grammatical? I don't understand which part "that naively believe you can simply accumulate more data and that will do the job" modifies. Can "believe" have an inanimate subject(ie, efforts)? Thanks if you would help.Read More...
Thank you for your remarks, Gustavo and Mengxn_209. I used “persons” instead of “people”, Gustavo, since “persons” represent a less general and much smaller group, that is, one working with voice-processing algorithms in a branch of medical science.Read More...
Last Reply By malgaff · First Unread Post

UP TO NOW OR UNTIL NOW?

Hallo! Could you explain the difference between UP TO NOw and UNTIL NOW? Can you give some examples? Thank you. ElenaRead More...
Hello, Elena, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. What makes you think they are different? There only difference between up to and until is that the former can be used for time and place, while the latter can only be used for time. When it comes to expressing a time limit, up to and until are equivalent. Syntactically, until can introduce noun clauses, while up to cannot.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

which

1) Working out strengthens your muscles and reduces stress, which is good for you. Could 'which is good for you' modify both 'reduces stress' and 'strengthens your muscles'? Maybe one could argue that both are seen as a package. I think '1' is ambiguous. It is not clear if only the eduction of stress is good for you or if both things are good for you. Is that correct? 2) Working out strengthens your muscles and reduces stress, which are good for you. Is '2' correct? We are trying to say that...Read More...
Hi, Navi, I think only (1) is correct to refer to the reduction of stress (and the strengthening of muscles). Being in the plural the relative clause in (2) needs a noun antecedent, which would be muscles and stress , but this does not make sense.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Sentence from The Hunger Games 1

Around the second page of chapter 1, there is this sentence: "Men and women with hunched shoulders, swollen knuckles, many who have long since stopped trying to scrub the coal dust out of their broken nails, the lines of their sunken faces." Is this even a grammatically correct sentence? To me, it seems like the author starts out listing features about these men and women by saying "Men and women with A, B and C" and I expected the sentence to follow this structure, but morphs into a...Read More...
Hello, Yongjae, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. The text you have quoted is not a sentence but merely a noun phrase that comes after a sentence where those people (the coal miners) were first mentioned: [...] Typically, that phrase would come after a colon or an em dash. However, being so long, I think that its inclusion after a period is admissible. Yes, you are understanding the phrase correctly.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Id parts of speech

Extra cheesy pizza If cheesy is an adjective describing pizza, then what is extra? I thought it was an adverb describing cheesy but an online dictionary called it an adjective. Adjectives can't describe other adjectives.Read More...
Thanks for the quick response. I don't why I didn't see that in the dictionary.Read More...
Last Reply By TheGREATRandino · First Unread Post

Not all your dreams may <not> come true.

How are you, everyone? 1. Not all your dreams may come true . (partial negation) 2. None of your dreams may come true . (total negation in my opinion) One of my friend told me the total negation of above no.1 through 'Double negative' should be read as follows; 3. Not all your dreams may not come true . Thus, I would hope to hear your clear answer to my following questions; 1) the exact meaning of above no. 3 2) if no.3 could be really the total negation for no.1? If so, do the natives use...Read More...
Just now I found my mistake in the previous post; " Almost your dreams may come true, but 100 percents of them couldn't do so." should read, " Most of your dreams may come true, but 100 percents of them couldn't do so."Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Till VS Until

Hussein Hassan
Hi, all ✋ Is there any difference between "till" and "until" except that the latter is more formal? I came across a difference between them in "600 confusing words" book, which states that we usually use "until" when the word starts the sentence. Contrastingly, Cambridge Dictionary Online says that we don't normally put the "until-clause" before the main clause. Which reference is correct?Read More...
Sorry, David, do mean that the following sentence: - Till you finish your homework, you can't watch TV. (which is considered wrong in "600 confusing words" book) is grammatically correct? Many thanks...Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

will vs going to

Hi, All! I hope amid this pandemic that everyone is safe. I have a couple of questions concerning future prediction. I hope anyone corrects me if I'm wrong in my understanding of the following sentences: Ali is faster than anyone in the race. I think he ……………the gold medal. a) is going to win b) will win I think my sister ……………….. a good journalist in the future. She is very ambitious. a) is going to be b) will be I think that, in the first sentence, " running faster " is a present reality ,...Read More...
Hi, Rasha, Do you mean you do see Ali running faster than anyone in the race and that he is about to win or is it just your opinion before the race? There is no progressive form here as ' running faster' isn't mentioned in your sentence. I see that there are two possible answers here. If you do see Ali running faster and is about to win, then 'is going to' is the correct choice, and that's the model answer to this question, as you know. However, if you think, before the race , that Ali is...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

grammar

Is this sentence correct ? i am calling about you come to pick me up .Read More...
No, it isn't. It should be: "I am calling about your coming to pick me up." That phrasing implies that there may already exist an agreement for the other person to pick you up and that it may need further discussion or elaboration. It even slightly implies that there may be a problem with said plan. If you didn't yet have a ride it would sound more natural to say "I am calling to ask if you could pick me up" or "I am wondering if you could give me a ride," etc.Read More...
Last Reply By A. Tutor · First Unread Post

How would you feel if ...

Hello! Could someone please tell me what tense to use when completing the sentence "How would you feel if ...?" I want people to imagine a situation, so it has not happened but they only need to think how they would feel would they be in such a situation. I was wondering which one is correct: How would you feel if you are walking around with worn out shoes full of holes? How would you feel if you would be walking around with worn out shoes full of holes? How would you feel if you were...Read More...
Hello, Britt, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. While I like the alternative Ahmed has recommended ("How would you feel if you didn't have enough money to bring a birthday present?") and think that "do" can work, the most natural tense to use in the "because"-clause there, I think, is "did": How would you feel if you couldn't go to birthday parties(,) because you didn't have the money to bring a gift? The "because"-clause is essentially backshifted to agree with "couldn't." Contrast that...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"is" or "are" in this case.

I'm not sure which sentence is correct: "The only fish I like are fish sticks" or "The only fish I like is fish sticks" Anyone sure? Thanks!Read More...
Hello, Hunter, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Like Gustavo, I think "is" sounds better, and for the reason he gives. Here's an alternative you might want to consider for your sentence: The only fish I like is the fish-stick variety .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Break the sentence down

I need to know if this is a correct sentence structure and if you can diagram it out for me. All that was found were their bikes and a pile of bonesRead More...
I agree with Gustavo that the main verb ("were") should be singular ("was") in that sentence. To use the plural verb, " All that was found" could be changed to "The only things that were found": The only things that were found were their bikes and a pile of bones.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Help me with the sentence

Dear Grammar experts, Could you tell me is it possible to make up the sentence in the following way: A talented follower of the father’s business of management of the Institute became .(name)... – a noted scientist, forensic expert, a talented educator of a wide range of forensic doctors. It means that his father used to managed the Institute, but now he doesn't as he is dead. His son manages the Institute. Another version = A talented follower of the father's business of the Institute...Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo! I will consider this variant. It is more like "His father's life's work ?" His father contributed to the Institute management a lot, and it was his life's work/business of his life. But now his son manages the institute. The whole sentence: "A talented follower of the father’s business of management of the Institute became Mykola Mykolaiovych Bokarius – a noted scientist, forensic expert, a talented educator of a wide range of forensic doctors and criminalists, who was...Read More...
Last Reply By DoraD · First Unread Post

Translation

Dear Grammar Experts, Could you please help me to translate the following Russian sentence: Архив криминологии и судебных наук Is it correct to translate it as "Archive of Criminology and Forensic Science"? Or is it better to say "Archives of Criminology and Forensic Science" ? Please, could you explain it to me. Thank you!Read More...
I see, thank you for your reply.Read More...
Last Reply By DoraD · First Unread Post

Stuck :/

Hi! I am trying to figure out how this sentence is structured and how it would be diagrammed. I am unsure what type of sub-clause is in here and the overall sentence diagram. Any help is appreciated, thanks! The sentence: After everything that happened, giving him a detention seemed unnecessary.Read More...
Thank you so much Gustavo! I surprisingly came up with the same result, although I am a bit confused because we have yet to go over gerunds in my class! I think that's why it was causing me so many problems. Thanks again!Read More...
Last Reply By Former Member · First Unread Post

something vs. anything?

Hello, everyone? I have one question - which pronoun will be suitable in the following sentence between something vs. anything; "Not until my mom came home did I eat [something/anything]." While the original one before inversion is "It was not until my mom came home that I ate something.", I assume it could be meant in following two ways; 1. I didn’t eat anything until my mom came home. (=negative sentence) 2. As soon as my mom came home, I ate something. (=affirmative sentence) While I am...Read More...
Always thank you, Mr. Gustavo ~ !!Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post
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