Skip to main content

May 2021

The use of quotation mark

Section 123B of the Income Tax Act 1928 ("ITA 1928") provides that where........ Can I not use the quotation mark for the one in bracket, so it reads as follows: Section 123B of the Income Tax Act 1928 (ITA 1928) provides that where........ Thanks!!!Read More...
You should use two, for example: - Under the Landlord-Tenant Acts ("the Acts"), both tenants and landlords have to abide by strict rules.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Where

Success The Psychology of Achievement: A Practical Guide to Unlocking You I don't understand why ' where ' was used in the sentence. Does it means 'by which ' or ' from which ' ? I don't know why 'the parts' is related to where. Could you explain it, please? Wald, however, saw that the important thing was that these bullet holes had not destroyed the planes, and what needed more protection were the areas that were not hit. Those were the parts where , if a plane was struck by a bullet, it...Read More...
Thank you for the explicit reply.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

Reported Speech

"I will give you your money back tomorrow." A) She promised me to give the money back the next day. B) She promised to give me back the money the next day. I have come across this question on two different websites.Sad to say, neither has the same answer. So, I have to consult.Read More...
Hi, Wael—Both (A) and (B) are grammatical, but (A) is equivalent in meaning to "She promised me that she would give the money back the next day"; it does not tell us to whom she will give the money back or whose money it was.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Placeholder

Please kindy accept this placeholder for our meeting that will be held on 1/1/2021. When I say placeholder, does it mean it is tentative only and not 100% certain?thanksRead More...

neither nor

Hello, Neither the students nor the teacher was in the room.(was is correct) Neither the teacher nor the students were in the room. (were is correct) Neither boys were (was) in the room.( either were or was is correct) Neither of the boys were (was) in the room. Neither boy(s) were( was) in the room. My questions: Are my comments in the brackets correct? In sentence 4, should "boys" be "boy" and what about the verb? Singular or plural? What about sentence 5? AppleRead More...
I see. Thank you, ahmed-btmRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

The definite article

Which is right? 1- Progress in industry, agriculture and medicine is due to modern technology. 2- The progress in industry, agriculture and medicine is due to modern technology. I tend to no. 1 as we speak in general, not specifically. What do you think?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed towab, Both sound fine to me. (1) seems to refer to any progress in those areas, while (2) would be equivalent to "the progress ( actually reported ) in industry, agriculture and medicine."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

How to say 4 years and 1/3 of a year?

Let's say I'm trying to say I've been doing this for two and a half years. Well that's just it. But it sounds really weird when I say, two and a third years, even though I'm saying the same thing grammatically. Do I say two and one third years? Do I start hyphenating them? It's so weird.Read More...
Just in case, David, do you agree with me that "two and a third years" is not possible? "Two and one-third years" sounds a little better. Or perhaps you can think of another alternative. Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

adjective

If I say, ' The soup is a popularly traditional dish in the country,' is the use of adverb, 'popularly' instead of ' popular,' wrong? I have another question for the sentence below. I know the phrase, 'in such a relatively short period' sounds right, but can I say like this? How can they establish the building in relatively such a short perio d?Read More...
the part, 'relatively very short ' you explained was awesome. Totally understood, thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

Enquiry

Enquiry Concerning the answer of the following question, could I add my point of view? The question: -........until the car had been checked before you returned home? a) Did you wait b) Had you waited 🔵I appreciate your efforts.I respect the site greatly.I think it is not natural to start a part of conservation with past perfect.I know that past perfect makes a connotation between the clauses, but I think 🔵."Did you wait.." is OK here The speaker is inquiring, starting a conversation.Read More...
Thank you, Sir I ought to have posted my comments in the main thread.Please accept my sincere apologies for any inconvenience caused. I appreciate your time and effort.ThanksRead More...
Last Reply By Mohamed Awad said · First Unread Post

Punctuation

Everybody at the school, including the teachers and students, is happy when summer holiday starts. Is this sentence grammatical?Read More...
Hello, Emad—I agree with Ahmed that the sentence is grammatical. Regarding punctuation, "including the teachers and students" clarifies parenthetically that the scope of the subject of the sentence ("Everybody at the school"). Because the phrase "including the teachers and students" is parenthetical, it is set off by a comma at both ends. The sentence could alternatively have been written like this. Here the parenthetical element is an entire sentence: Everybody at the school (that includes...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

too much difficult to answer

Hello. Is the following sentence correct? - This question is too much difficult for these students to answer. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed and Ahmed—Ahmed_btm is right that "too much" can't be used used before used before adjectives without nouns; however, "much" will be perfectly fine if you place it before "too" rather than after "too": This question is much too difficult for these students to answer.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

so quickly

Hello. Could you clear up the confusion about the following sentence? - He runs...... runner that he is the first contender for the gold medal. (so quickly - so quick a - such a quick - such quickly) Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, 'Run' here is intransitive . That means it doesn't take an object. I think 'runner' here is a typo. You can say: - He runs so quickly that he ........ - He is such a quick runner that he ........ - He is so quick a runner that he ........Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

much that, much which

Hello. Could you help me choose the correct answer? - Much (that - which) your father has said shows that he is angry. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, This sentence sounds odd, but I'd go with ' that '. 'That' is common after 'much'. I see that the author here wants to use 'much' as a pronoun. It means 'much (information / of the information)'. I think what is more natural to say is: - Much of what your father has said shows that he is angry.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

answers of the following questions

Use the right forms of the verbs given in the brackets to complete the passage given below: (You will not have to copy the whole passage. Just mention the numbers against your answers) You can i_____(reduce) your chances of being ii______ (infect) or spreading COVID-19 by iii____ (take) some simple precautions: Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or iv_____(wash) them with soap and water. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based...Read More...
Hi, Ishui1, and welcome to the G.E, The G.E. is not for doing others' homework. If you have a problem with a particular question, you should tell us your answer first so that we can help you. Most importantly, you must read the guidelines of this forum first.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

one of his friends

1) One of his friends who play s soccer came to our restaurant last night. 2) One of his friends who play soccer came to our restaurant last night. I think in '2' he has a number of friends who play soccer and one of them came to our restaurant last night. In '1' we don't know if he has only one friend who plays soccer or more, but the former is probably more likely. Is that correct? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—Yes, that's right. In (1), the relative clause must be interpreted as modifying "one" because the verb of the relative clause is singular, and, in (2), the relative clause must be interpreted as modifying "friends" because the verb of the relative clause is plural. Each parsing yields its respective interpretation.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

grammatically correct or not?

Hi everyone I have read a text from the internet. There are some sentences that I think are not grammatically correct. Could you please have a look at the text below? The Convenience Society, or con for short The other day I took my younger children to a Burger King for lunch and there was a line of about a dozen cars at the drive-through window. Now, a drive-through window is not a window you drive through, but a window you drive up to and collect your food from, having placed your order...Read More...
Many thanks, GustavoRead More...
Last Reply By hope · First Unread Post

Under scrutiny or under scrutinized

Should I say, his bank account is currently under scrutiny or under scrutinized?Read More...
Hi, Tony, "Under" is a preposition, so it should be followed by a noun. You can say: - His bank account is currently under scrutiny . or - His bank account is currently being scrutinized .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

leaving out ‘being’?

Hello, everyone, “The way we present ourselves can speak more eloquently of the skills we bring to the table, if we actively cultivate that presentation. Nobody likes to be crossed off the list before being given the opportunity to show others who they are . Being able to tell your story from the moment you meet other people is a skill that must be actively cultivated, in order to send the message that you’re someone to be considered and the right person for the position.” My question is...Read More...
Hi, David, thanks a million!!Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Relative clause and the verb "show"

Hi, It would be greatly appreciated if you could assist with my questions in bold below. Example: In support of your contention that you acquired the units in the ABC unit trust, you provided the following documents: a) a XYZ bank history report which shows that, on 1 January 2000, you withdrew $100K to acquire the units in the said trust. You need to use “that” as it follows by a date. [Can I remove the relative clause “which”?] b) a XYZ bank history report which shows you withdrew $100K on...Read More...
The answer to all three questions is "no." The clause introducing the list ("you provided the following documents") indicates that all the items in the list will be a noun phrase (NP): "You provided NP1, NP2, NP3, etc." Examples (1) and (2) are noun phrases. If you delete "which" in (1) and (2), you will change them into sentences. But sentences cannot function as the complements of "provided" in that sense. Therefore you can't delete "which." The difference between (3), on the one hand, and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

That

Hi, Can I omit "that" in these sentences? 1-Before the Covid-19 pandemic, data from 122 countries indicated that on average, 31.1% of adults are physically inactive and over 80% of adolescents perform less than 60 min of daily physical activities. 2- Time-efficient exercise programs that counteract physical inactivity, especially after the Covid-19 pandemic, are a recent major topic of investigation.Read More...
Great! Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By marcofabri · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×