June 2018

Difference between "In" and "of"

Can anyone please tell me what's the difference between in and of in the following sentences? Are they both correct? Lionel Messi is the greatest player of/in the Argentina football team. John is the best student in/of the class. The roads in/of the USA are wider than those of Russia.Read More...
I am very sorry that the post you wanted to link to, Gustavo, is imprisoned inside the Moderation Queue and hope soon to be able to rescue it, along with the many thousands of other posts in the same boat. As you know, I am waiting for a guarantee from Tech Support that content that has been "approved" (i.e., released) from the Moderation Queue will in fact manifest in the actual threads. Once I have that, I will release all of those posts ASAP. In American English, the best preposition to...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Critic for v.s critic of

What is the difference between " a critic for sth" and " a critic of sth" ? This question poped out after i saw this sentence : He was appointed as critic for multiculturalism and religious pluralism. ** And why it was not " ..as a critic.." ? Thank u in advance .^_^Read More...
Hello, Al-Shadly, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The collocation is "critic of " when the preposition introduces the issue being criticized . I have found that in Canada the members of the opposition shadow cabinet are known as critics, with "for" introducing the area that those parliamentary members deal with . "critic of" would mean that they are against, not that they devote their time to those aspects or fields. We thus find examples like this one: - Mable Elmore is a Canadian...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I intend to or I am intending to?

Hi, I'd like to know the correct grammar for this sentence: would you say I haven't washed the dishes yet but i intend to. or/ I haven't washed the dishes yet but i am intending to. Thank you :)Read More...
I agree that the simple form is more logical here. "Intend" is one of the few verbs that I don't think I would ever use in the present progressive . I can't think of a single example in which it would make sense or sound natural to me to do so. But, Gustavo, I'm very glad you found that lovely post authored by Betty Azar, and will make a point of looking for the coverage of the present progressive with "intend" in the Azar books. I have the utmost respect for her grammatical judgments. If...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Formal or informal English

Hi, I have this question concerning teaching English (grammar): Should we teach formal English only or we should teach the informal form too?Read More...
Hi, Ayman, I think we completely agree that a good teacher, like you, should / must know formal and informal English, and that the most important thing is to teach students what they have in their books. Students shouldn't be given information that may confuse them in the exam. If there are two correct options as you have mentioned above, you will find the correct answer is the formal one in all our model answers. Again, I agree that it is sometimes annoying, but we know the weakest point in...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Want you to or want for you to

Hi, I want to know whether these expressions are correct and if they mean the same thing: 1. I'd like for you to study law. 2. I'd like you to study law. Thank you so much.Read More...
Thanks so much, everyone. I'm so happy to be back here. From what I read, it seems Rachel isn't on the site any longer. Those months I was without a browsing phone I must have missed a lot. Thanks again for the quick responses. I always like this site.Read More...
Last Reply By Yale Wale · First Unread Post

Unusual Plural

My school uses an alligator as a mascot. His name is Navi (pronounced Nav-ee) the navigator. We frequently use his name in the plural as we have various versions of his image. How should we make his name plural? Navis Navies Please...anything but an unconventional use of the apostrophe.Read More...
Heather, I apologize for taking so long to respond here. I agree with everything GrammarCrazed says here. An apostrophe with "s" can only be used for possessives or contractions of "is" or "has": Navi's been missing for a while, hasn't he? I agree with what Ahmed says about Nazis, but not for the same reason. Even with common nouns ending with "i", the plural is almost always made with the addition of a simple "s"; hence "skis", "khakis", and "taxis" (although I've seen some sources that say...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Zero and First Conditionals

ceedhanna
I read in an Egyptian reference that if we want to differentiate between zero and first conditionals we generalize the facts or define them like in these examples: 1a- If a cube of ice is heated, it turns into water. 1b- If this cube of ice is heated, it will turns into water. 2a-If it rains , streets become wet 2b- If it rains tonight , streets will become wet. 3a- If it rains, streets become wet 3b- If it rains, the streets of our town will become wet. How far is this true?Read More...
Hi, Ceedhanna: I agree with Gustavo's answer, particularly with his point that the "generalized" (a) sentences may be suitably expressed with either the zero conditional or the first conditional. I think that a better way to differentiate the two, for a learner who is trying to decide between them, is to try to express the conditional using "whenever" instead of "if." If "whenever" works, so will the zero conditional: 1d- Whenever an ice cube is heated, it turns into water. 1e- * Whenever...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"play a role (in) V-ing"

The phrase "play a role" can be followed by "in V-ing" as in (1) below: (1) This NPO plays a central role in proposing environmental policies. My question is whether the preposition "in" can delete as in (2): (2) This NPO plays a central role proposing environmental policies. I got this question because I sometimes come across the phrase like "play a role V-ing" without the presposition "in." If the preposition in this phrase can delete, I wonder whether there might be any difference between...Read More...
Hi Gustavo, Thank you so much for your comments! I understand. It is interesting to see the preposition "by," not "in" or zero, sounds better if the V-ing phrase is put in the focus position of the cleft sentence.Read More...
Last Reply By yasukotta · First Unread Post

Inquiry

I have been using and benefited of learning English through Grammar Exchange since many years ago. Recently, I noticed the format / platform has been changed. May I know whether it is still serving the same purpose? I still prefer the previous one, so I can see other comments.Read More...
Noted, thanks. Capt (Rtd) Joshua Loo On Wednesday, 27 June 2018, 4:36:47 AM GMT+8, The Grammar Exchange < alerts@hoop.la > wrote: Reply By davidmoderator: Inquiry | == To reply by email, write above this line. == | | | | | Hello, joshua: We're sending you this notification because you are either following the forum, the content, or the author listed below. New Reply To Topic | Subject: Inquiry Reply By: davidmoderator In: | | Hi, Joshua: Yes, the website platform of the Grammar...Read More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

no more ... than

The following is an excerpt from The Japan Times of June 22. What does "It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story" mean? The spread of misinformation ‒ "fake news" if that's more your speed ‒ has long been an issue, but social media has accelerated it significantly. It's no more glaring than in the early hours of a developing story, where facts are scarce but the Twitter timeline moves at a rapid pace.Read More...
Thanks. It's now crystal clear what the sentence means.Read More...
Last Reply By fujibei · First Unread Post

not six feet

Can one write a. A group of not well-educated people are very happy with the new measures. b. A group of people not well-educated are very happy with the new measures. c. b. A group of people, not well-educated, are very happy with the new measures. d. A man, not six feet tall, walked into a store. e. A man, not six-foot tall, walked into a store. ? Do (d) and (e) mean that the man was shorter than six feet? Many thanks.Read More...

ripen / ripe fruits

Which is correct? They saw a guava tree with many ripen / ripe fruits.Read More...
Hi, Ahmedimammatia, As you can read in David's answer, "ripe" is the usual choice, but "ripened" can work too to refer to the completion of the process of ripening. Notice that David said that "ripened" is usually used with the agent, as in "sun-ripened," meaning "ripened by the sun." Compare white wall with whitened wall . A white wall is one which is white and has perhaps always been white, while a whitened wall is one which has undergone a process of whitening.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Is it hundreds of flowers or hundreds of flower?

A. There are hundreds of flowers blooming in my garden. B. There are hundreds of flower blooming in my garden. Which one is correct?Read More...
Hello, Ahmedimamattia, and welcome to the new Grammar Exchange. The appearance of the site has in fact changed for reasons beyond our control and we are seeing to it that some features (including the search function) can be restored soon. In the meantime, is there any way in which we can help you with the question Moon98 asked? Perhaps you were looking for some related answer and we can help you to find it.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

to be anywhere

1) I'm happy to be anywhere. Apparently Keith Richards said that. Maybe a lot of other people have as well. Source: https://tinyurl.com/yaypjw2q Can't the sentence mean two things: a) I enjoy being anywhere. b) I am happy to be alive, no matter where I am. The very fact that I am somewhere makes me feel happy, because it means I am somewhere and not dead. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, Yes, I think that (1) can have both of those meanings. But I don't think the two meanings are necessarily separate meanings. Meaning (b) simply expresses a possible reason for (a), to capture (1)'s rhetorical flourish. We could phrase meaning (b) likes this: I am happy to be anywhere, because I could have been nowhere, and I think being anywhere is better than being nowhere. Meaning (a) by itself could be expressed like this: (2) I am happy wherever I am / go / find myself.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Parallel sentences, needed or not needed.

Hi. What do you think of parallel sentence structure? This means using the same pattern of words to show that two or more ideas have the same level of importance. This can apply to words, phrases, or clauses. Is this a must, or a just a style of writing? I recently wrote about a man entranced by a pile of diamonds: "Dazzling, hypnotic, as the multicoloured waterfall caught the lights." But i was told off, stating that it should be dazzling, hypnotising, What do you think? Is it a rule to be...Read More...
Hi, John: Thanks for beginning a new thread for this question, the topic of which is different from that of your first thread. Coincidentally, however, you have written something here that relates to the earlier thread. Can you identify the subject of "stating" in the sentence quoted above as you have written it? I think it's wonderful. Actually, grammatical parallelism generally refers to there being shared syntactic status between or among the phrasal conjuncts of coordinate structures.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Present perfect

Choose the correct answer: He left home in 2000 and has not been heard of (yet - since - still - already).Read More...
With pleasure, Mr. Ragheb. Simply click on the big green "Post" tab in the upper right corner of the web page. The rest should be self-explanatory. Please let us know if you have any difficulties. We look forward to seeing questions from you.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

sequence of tenses

husseinhassan
Good morning, our teacherS, From The General Secondary Education Certificate Examination of Egypt, 2018: 1. I worked hard all day round, but I had failed to ___________ my goals. ( find / follow / score / achieve ) Sure, "achieve" is the correct choice, but I wonder whether the sentence is MEANINGFULLY correct or not. Note the tenses sequence, i.e. Wh ich action logically should happen first? Shouldn't it be: 2. I HAD WORKED hard all day round, but I FAILED to achieve my goals. Or 3. I HAD...Read More...
I'd like to express my gratitude to you Gustavo and David for your help. Thank you so much.Read More...
Last Reply By husseinhassan · First Unread Post

participle subject advice needed

Hi And thanks for reading this post. I am trying to find the reason for errors in writing. Being a guy, *it is hard for him to understand her point of view. Having heard this before, *her patience was wearing thin. Being very rational, *speaking frankly was a very important to him. Wounding like an arrow, *he sometimes hated to hear the truth. Mentioned as constructive criticism,*there were no hard feelings. The explanation is: When a participle clause is placed before a clause, the...Read More...
Hi, John: Parallelism is important, but how important it is depends upon the individual case. Since this is a completely different topic, if you'd like to discuss it, you should start a separate thread devoted to the topic. Thank you. I don't have a problem with the coordination of "dazzling" and "hypnotic." Since both are adjectives, no exception to the principle of grammatical parallelism is involved. Again, the topic is worthy of a thread of its own. Returning to the main theme of this...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

get it complete / completing / completed

Which is correct? What rules that we follow? Thanks. Since the tasks is hard, Peter has to burn the midnight oil to get it complete / completing / completed on time.Read More...
That's true, David, so true that I always teach my students only the pattern with "to"-infinitive along with the one using the past participle, in pairs of examples like the following: - Peter got a friend to complete the task for him. (active causative meaning) - Peter got his task completed . (passive causative meaning) I agree. I just made the addition in case somebody else came across this thread (that's why I wrote it for the "general public," so to speak).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post
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