Skip to main content

June 2020

Does "programme" here mean a computer program or something like plan, projecet?

She was entering numbers on the computer for a sales programme . But the results looked wrong. A programmer came and said," you have some problems with the sales programme ?" He did some work on the computer. He said:" There's a mistake in the prgramme . I knew there was something wrong with the numbers we were getting." Do the three"programme" have the same ming? Do they mean computer programme or sales project?Read More...
Than you, David! So they don't mean the same thing. Get it !Read More...
Last Reply By alexandra · First Unread Post

Pure location

Hello, I was recently watching a video about prepositions of place. The instructor was describing when to use in or at for the same location. She stated that we use in before a pure location and gave this example There was a fire in the home/in the office. She said that if we give the same location and relate it to what someone does there then we use at. e.g John is at home.e.g John is at the office. Can someone please tell me what pure location means in this context. Thank you.Read More...
thank youRead More...
Last Reply By Mrchuffie · First Unread Post

Question

- Thick clouds darkened the sky before the rain .... A) poured B) fell Thanks in advance!Read More...

It ____ true because

Hello forum, --- I heard they went skiing in the mountains last winter. --- It ____ true because there was little snow there. A. may not be B. won't be C. couldn't be D. mustn't be Key C source: from a test paper I think A, B, C are all possible. In fact, I can doubt anything beginning with (No no no), it A/B/C true, because blar blar blar... (A/B/C are the above options.) And I don't think whether the "blar blar blar" part is a fact or not matters much. ----------- "To respect" the fact the...Read More...
[quote] Of the four responses provided, "may not be" is the best. [/quote] Yes, I agree. The weaker the tone, the better the manners here. What if "with all due respect" is used here? Aha, with all due respect, I don't think it's possible, because there was little snow there. Thank you again, David.Read More...
Last Reply By Mengxin_2009 · First Unread Post

article inversion

Windward
Hello. Please, correct me if I'm wrong in this part of a sentence: 'He was endowed with gaiety the most furious, courage the most careless...' Is such an example of inversion in English grammatically correct or should I put it like that: '...the gaiety most furious, the courage most careless'? (I know the easiest way to say it is 'the most furious courage....') but my point is that I want and must use adjectives in superlative degree after nouns.Read More...

Setting with vs Setting about

What are the difference between "setting with" and "setting about"? Can I use them interchangeably in the sentence below? Interesting. Well, perhaps you can try to lead by example and be really mindful of the example that you’re 𝘀𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 manners that you have.Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

grammar

Do "a runaway and a run out " have the same meaning ?Read More...
Hi, iIKo, 'Run out' is a phrasal verb , not a noun. I think you mean 'runout' written as one word. Collins dictionary defines it in American English as a person who runs away so as to avoid payment or duty, while it defines 'runaway' in British English as a countable noun which refers to someone, especially a child , who leaves home without telling anyone or without permission and in American English as a person who runs away; fugitive ; deserter. Also, it is noticeable that 'runaway' can be...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

not necessary

It's (not necessary - necessary not) to go school on Fridays.It's a holiday.Read More...
Hi, Zonzon, The better answer is 'not necessary'. 'It isn't necessary to' is close in meaning to 'You don't have to / needn't'. 'It is necessary not to ....' means 'it is necessary that you don't ....'. It is close in meaning to 'mustn't'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

phrase costruction

Windward
Please, help me with this sentence: "We fought a duel. My adversary has missed a shot at me/missed me . No it was my turn to shoot." My first choice is missed a shot at me , is it grammatically correct? Missed me sounds dubious.Read More...
Hi, Windward—"Missed a shot at me" is a grammatical English phrase.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Same double words in one sentence?

Dear grammar exchange team, Could you please explain why there are two of in this sentence "Elections provide Canadians with an opportunity to debate and decide the future agenda of of their government, and as such represent extremely important moments in Canadian history." Except this two "of" sentence, any other chance that I will see same double words at one sentence, such as "that that", and Wu Thank you very much. ^_^Read More...
Hello, Christine, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. What you have found here is a typo. The author meant to type "of" only once. I think that that is quite possible. Words can occur twice in a row for a number of reasons. If you would like to see more examples, please let me know. Here's a famous example: Buffalo buffalo buffalo. That's a complete sentence: the first "buffalo" an indefinite plural subject, the second is the plural verb "buffalo," and the third is a plural direct object.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

construction of dependent clause

Windward
Hello. Is this sentence correct: "I think, we are not having a duel but a murder. Let’s start anew, cast lots for who to shoot first. ' Can I put for who to shoot first instead of the long awkward to find out who will shoot first ?Read More...
I've never heard anyone speak of casting lots, so, yes, it sounds unnatural.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Using would to express habits

Choose: When I was in Alexandria I ( sunbathed - would sunbathe ) a lot. Model answer was ( sunbathed ) but some think that ( would sunbathe) can work ,too, because ( a lot ) gives the impression that the action was repeated many times and there is a time reference at the beginning, what do you think?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, See here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...3#585938791434343883Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

I need an expression

Windward
Please, anybody knows an expression to describe such a situation: a man, the main character, lives alone, bored to death, tries to pass time, "From morning till launch I somehow manage to drag time/pull time , but as soon as it begins to grow dark I don't know where to put myself" Does anybody know a good expression, idiom in English meaning something like pulling or dragging but not killing?Read More...

suggestion on email

I am a bit confused between a and b. Which one is right? a) Thank you for the contract. Please let me know when it is convenient for you to briefly discuss it. b) Thank you for the contract. Please let me know when it is convenient for you to discuss it briefly. ThanksRead More...
Last Reply By pbh · First Unread Post

Future

What future tense would you use in sentences about schedules of a lesson, e.g.: Today, we will first talk about the picture and then focus on the text./We will now go on with... or: Today, we are going to talk about the picture first and then continue with the text. We are going to discuss the topic of...next. Thank you!! : )Read More...
Hello, EmmiBonn1990, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. You can actually use both "will" and "be going to." "Be going to" is commonly used at the outset of a passage concerning the future. You can then continue the passage using "will."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Question tag

1) One never knows what is going to happen in the future,............? ( do you - does he - does she - does one - do they) The answer is ''does one'', but what about ''do they'' , is it Ok,too?!Read More...
Hi, Muhammed, No, it isn't. 'One' is highly formal and the best answer is 'does one'. To be less formal, you can use 'You never know what ......, do you?'Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

grammar

what is the difference between " i was going to do it and I would have done it"Read More...
Hi, Ilko, 'I would have done it' refers to an implied 3 rd conditional and indicates that I didn't do that action. For example, you can say "If you had told me, I would have done it, but you didn't." "Was going to do it" needs a further context. It could mean that the speaker had a particular plan or intended to do something, but they changed their mind or something happened. Here's an example from Cambridge Dictionary: A: You’re not staying out in this rain, are you? B: Well I was going to...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

certain of his friends

a. There are certain of his friends he doesn't know I have talked to. b. He doesn't know I have talked to some of his friends. c. He doesn't know that I have talked to certain of his friends. I think in (a) it is clear that he knows that I have talked to some of his friends, but there are other friends of his I have talked to and he doesn't know that. I think (b) and (c) are ambiguous. Maybe he thinks I haven't talked to any of his friends, and maybe he knows that I have talked to some, but...Read More...
Hi, Azz—I agree with your conclusions about the three sentences, though I think that, for (b) and (c), the reading according to which there are some/certain of his friends that he doesn't know you have talked to is strained unless "some" or "certain" is emphasized. Coincidentally, Navi has just asked a very similar question to the one you have asked here, Azz. Take a look . Welcome back, Batman. I believe you're a native speaker, so your sense that "certain of his friends" is grammatically...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×