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July 2020

Is it ......

Are all the sentences below grammatical? (a) Is it true. (adjective form - true) (b) Is it needed for doing the work. (passive form - needed) (c) Is it allowed for us to collect the data. (passive form - needed). (d) Is it you have to do the work for them?Read More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

Phrases that start with "with"

With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away , Parliament is debating Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, which it has already rejected twice by large margins, before a third vote on Friday afternoon. (source of this sentence: with britain in political crisis and a new deadline ). 1) With Britain in political crisis and a new deadline to leave the European Union two weeks away -is it an absolute phrase? Or is it an appositive? It seems...Read More...
Sir, the link you have provided is really informative and full of explanation. Thanks a lot!Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

I tested positive

For Corona virus, what do we always refer someone tested positive, instead of saying I was tested positive.Read More...
Hello, Tony—The latter is not more correct. Indeed, in my opinion, the latter is incorrect. "Tested" is not being used transitively in the construction, so passivization does not make sense. We would not say, " The doctor tested him positive for HIV ," so why would we say, " He was tested positive for HIV "? The verb "test" is intransitive here; it means "to achieve a rating as a result of a test" or "to exhibit a given characteristic when subjected to a test." There is no way to passivize...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Arising out

Hello, Risk arising out of the stimulus measure and risk that is arising out of the stimulus measure. Are they both correct and if so, what tense it is for the 1st one as it is skipping the "is". ThanksRead More...
In both cases you have to say: - The risk (that is) arising out of the stimulus measure cannot be quantified at the present time. "that is" can be omitted and, as a result, you obtain an abridged relative clause.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

On/In - preposition for system

We use the accounting software for bookkeping called Xero and client relationship management software called Isell. Do we ay on Isell/Xero or in Isell/Xero?Read More...

Shorten the sentence without changing in meaning.

I am confused whether the following sentence has the same meaning. I refer to the document which I have enclosed into this email and I refer to the document enclosed into this email. If it is the same in meaning, what grammar structure it is. Thank you!!!Read More...
It is wrong.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

If I were half as serious about my life(as I am while playing games) i'd be a millionaire.

I was playing video games very seriously and I said to myself: 1) "If I were half as serious about my life (as I am while playing video games) I'd be a millionaire now." My question is do I need to mention 'playing video games' or is it implied from the context? Another example: I was looking at a picture and said: 2) I wish my genetics were half as good (as his). Same questions- Is 'as his' required?Read More...
Thank you very much for the answer and the corrections. Just an hour ago I was talking about lockdown in Dubai vs India. An Indian guy who currently lives in Dubai said that the lockdown has been lifted due to very low number of cases. I said: "It makes sense since it's a rich state and not as populated (as India)." Now I didn't say 'as India' since we were already talking about Dubai vs India. According to your answer I think my sentence was correct. Please correct me if I'm mistaken.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

not-so-tacit

From: https://chomsky.info/01072017/ "Subordination to the prevailing orthodoxy has consequences. The not-so-tacit message is that we should only fight smart wars that are not blunders, wars that succeed in their objectives – by definition just and right according to prevailing orthodoxy even if they are in reality “wicked wars,” major crimes. Illustrations are too numerous to mention. In some cases, like the crime of the century, the practice is virtually without exception in respectable...Read More...
Hi, Izzy—Do you view these as grammar questions or as reading comprehension questions? While we volunteer our time to teach grammar, I would want to get paid to hold your hand and walk you through the meaning of a Chomsky article.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Prudence

I hope you can help. I am translating the article at the link below. It is not clear to me which of the four meanings for the word (prudence) was intented. https://chomsky.info/01072017/ Mark Twain famously said that “it is by the goodness of God that in our country we have those three unspeakably precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the prudence never to practice either of them.” From Merriam-Webster 1: the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of...Read More...
All four of those definitions fit in that context, Izzy. Think about it.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Even after knowing something?

I was talking to a guy who's just a beginner and couldn't speak English properly but he was acting like he knows everything already and was saying things that were very offensive. So I said to someone: " Even after knowing that I'm an advanced learner and I speak better English than him he was acting like he knows everything." Is 'even after knowing' a natural thing to say? Another example: "Even after meeting me backstage she told them that she doesn't even know me."Read More...
I see. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

Comma before a modifier

As vital as their igloos, which permit the Innuits to live in reasonable comfort in an icy land, and just as ingenious , is their winter clothing, so perfect in design and material that it makes them nearly impervious to any arctic weather. (Source of this sentence: as vital as their igloos which permit the innuits to live in ). Subject of this sentence is winter clothing (their winter clothing) . I faced no trouble to find out what the subject is. As winter clothing is the subject, all...Read More...
Sir, thanks for clearing my doubt.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

since or ago

Hi, all I read in Oxford Advanced learners' Dictionary that we can use since instead of ago. The example sentence there is : He did it many years SINCE . Could you please spot light on this point ?Read More...
Well, that's weird. I also noticed that we can use the present perfect after since in spite of the fact that the present perfect doesn't refer to a specific point in the past!!! Henry’s been teetotal since we’ve been married. How in the world do we use present perfect after since??!!Read More...
Last Reply By Godknows · First Unread Post

Face - tense

Why the "face" verb in the sentence below is written as "plural verb"? The former Minneapolis police officer who was charged in George Floyd's death and his estranged wife face nine felony income-tax charges, according to the Washington County, Minnesota, attorney. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/07/22/us/minneapolis-fired-police-officer-chauvin-felony-tax-charges/index.htmlRead More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

surprising effectiveness

From: https://chomsky.info/01072017/ "In his unpublished introduction to Animal Farm, devoted to “literary censorship” in free England, George Orwell added a reason for this prudence: there is, he wrote, a “general tacit agreement that ‘it wouldn’t do’ to mention that particular fact.” The tacit agreement imposes a “veiled censorship” based on “an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed that all right-thinking people will accept without question,” and “anyone who challenges the...Read More...

Get + object

Hi Adel will get a gardener ......... after the garden. A. look B. to looking C. looking D. looks I think B & C could work in such a context. What do you think ?Read More...
Only 'c' works among your options. However, there is another option that is not given above. That's 'to look'. Adel will get a gardener to look after the garden. It means "Adel will make a gardener look after the garden." See this thread: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...topic/causative-haveRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post
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