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July 2020

Outlined with...

▪ 𝗢𝘂𝘁𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲𝗱 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 multicoloured LEDs, Gaur Nath wants to draw attention to the importance of wearing facial protection amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Does "outlined with multicoloured LEDs" indicates passive? What is the meaning of "outlined with" here?Read More...
Toaha, "mask" is singular, so you cannot use "were" but "was" there. If you want to transform these sentences: - With his mask outlined with multicoloured LEDs / Wearing a mask outlined with multicoloured LEDs , Gaur Nath wants to draw attention to the importance of wearing facial protection amid the COVID-19 pandemic. into two independent sentences, you can say: Gaur Nath's mask is outlined with multicolored LEDs. That way, he wants to draw attention to the importance of wearing facial...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

in cold climate

Hi, Page 2, from: https://books.google.com.sa/books?id=Qj-BCwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=are+some+languages+better&hl=ar&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjSlefN3-jqAhUhShUIHem6Aj0Q6AEwAHoECAAQAg#v=onepage&q=are%20some%20languages%20better&f=false Does the underlined part only describe (clothing)? Or it describes (sustenence and shelter) as well? In my opinion it only describes (clothing). Also, I think that the author means (warm clothing) as clothing is also needed in other ...Read More...
Crystal clear! Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Things may look like..

Which one is correct and why? Please explain 1) Things may look like one thing but be another thing. 2) Things may look like one thing but may be another thing.Read More...

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

Nowhere in the entire webpage, can I see the topic of evolution of racing cars being touched. Is this sentence grammatically correct?Read More...
Hello, U., and welcome to G.E. That sentence is almost correct. Perhaps you are having trouble with the subject–auxiliary inversion triggered by the fronted negative adverbial ("Nowhere in the entire webpage"). It is the fronting of that phrase that causes the auxiliary verb ("can") to need to appear before the subject ("I"). There are three problems with the sentence, however. First, there should not be a comma between "webpage" and "can." Second, it would be good for "the" to precede...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Selling children

Hi, From https://www.amazon.com/Take-Control-Your-Anxiety-Drug-Free/dp/1601633564 When I read the underlined part in the file attached, I was astonished. I cannot imagine parents selling their kids. Does the word (sell) here have a different meaning? If not, why is that done?Read More...

Today, I also got...

Are these sentences grammatical and natural? ▪ Today, I also got crow droppings on my shoulder. ▪I got crow droppings on my shoulder today as well.Read More...

Different forms of modifiers

In their physical characteristics, bat species range from the hog-nosed type, the size of a bumblebee and weighing about as much as a penny , to fruit-eating bats that weigh two pounds and have a wingspan of up to six feet. (Source of this sentence: In their physical characteristics bat species range from ). Hog-nosed type bat weighs about as much as a penny does—this sentence clearly makes sense. In the above sentence weighing about as much as a penny also makes sense. A comma has been...Read More...
Patiently, you have answered all my questions. I am really grateful to you.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

Placement of modifying clause

Hello. I often see and hear what I think is a mistake regarding placement of a modifying clause in a sentence. It goes like this ( e.g. , from a television ad): "As a mom, education is important to me." My sense is that this appears to equate "mom" and "education." I think the opening clause should instead be followed immediately by what it modifies, e.g. : "As a mom, I care about education." Am I correct? If so, is there a "name" for this mistake?Read More...
I do indeed.Read More...
Last Reply By Michael B · First Unread Post

Have/Has been+adj/noun vs be+adj/noun

Do these sentences have the same meaning? When I use have/has been+adj/noun? 1) There have been umpteen research papers proving that diet is one of the major determiners of health and length of life, but most people still eat really bad food. 2)There are umpteen research papers proving that diet is one of the major determiners of health and length of life, but most people still eat really bad food.Read More...
Thanks 💖Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

goods that are positional

When people pursue goods that are positional, they can't help being in the rat race. What does 'goods that are positional' mean? Sorry for it not being about grammar.Read More...
Hi, Kis, According to the Cambridge Dictionary , the "rat race" is a way of life in modern society , in which people compete with each other for power and money . And, in keeping with that, "positional goods" are defined on Wikipedia as "goods valued only by how they are distributed among the population, not by how many of them there are available in total as would be the case with other consumer goods . The source of greater worth of positional goods is their desirability as a status symbol...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

adjectival clause

Are these sentences correct: 1) He had to take his books and his computer. And impossible to leave behind, there was his mother's diary. 2) I had to choose between a few good men. There was Tom. There was Jack. And tall, strong and young, there was Pete. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—Interesting question. I find (1) correct and (2) incorrect, though I would prefer (1) if there were an additional comma, after "And": 1a) He had to take his books and his computer. And, impossible to leave behind, there was his mother's diary. "Impossible to leave behind" is a parenthetical insertion, not some fronted adjective phrase. If "tall, strong and young" is understood as a parenthetical insertion in (2), rather than what it appears to be (a fronted adjective phrase),...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"One" that refers an antecedent

A country could keep some of the advantages of being in the European Union with an association agreement, such as the one Norway has, but it would find it much harder to influence trade and competition policy. (source of this sentence: A country could keep some of the advantages of being in the european union ) Which is one referring to? Does it refer to A country ? If we omit one and say such as Norway has , this sentence seems correct to me. I don't find any reason to mention one to refer...Read More...
Yes, use of original word again helps best to avoid ambiguity. But I was not sure about it. Thanks for your clarification.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

"That" as a modifier

Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring locales that he made during his five-year voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin conceived his theory of natural selection whereby all species have evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors . (Source of this sentence: prompted by observations of seemingly related species ). As far as I know, that is placed just next to the words which that modifies. In the above sentence, "...Read More...
Sir, your explanation was really helpful. You have explained the whole matter.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

an article he had written last night

a. He showed me an article which he had written last night and which was about whales. Could 'last night' modify 'showed'? Could the sentence mean Last night he showed me an article which he had written and which was about whales. ? I know that (a) is an awkward sentence, but it it grammatical. I want to see if it is ambiguous. To me it seems that 'last night' can only modify 'had written', but I am not sure about that. Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz—No, "last night" can only modify "had written," wedged, as it is, between two coordinate relative clauses. Syntactically, there is no way for a matrix-clause modifier to insert itself between two coordinated clauses lower down. "Last night" can modify "showed" instead of "had written" if there is no coordinate clause: " He showed me an article about whales which he had written last night ." But it would be better placed elsewhere for that meaning.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

First conditional or not?!!

If you want to do something different for your next holiday , you have come to the right place. /// is this a first conditional or not? Present perfect tense confuses me a lot! Thank you!Read More...
Hello, Natalya, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. In real language, conditional sentences are not restricted to the three or four types that are usually taught. The sentence above is close to the so-called type zero conditionals, where we find present both in the condition and in the result. Compare with: If you are willing to do something different for your next holiday, then you are at the right place. (If A is true, B is true.)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Combination of passive verb and preposition

Defense attorneys have occasionally argued that their clients’ misconduct stemmed from a reaction to something ingested, but if criminal or delinquent behavior is attributed to an allergy to some food allergy, the perpetrators are in effect told that they are not responsible for their actions. (source of this sentence: Defense attorneys have occasionally argued that their clients ). 1) Actually meaning of this sentence isn't clear to me. Probably this sentence says some criminals commit...Read More...
Thanks a lot for making this topic clear.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

'Anyone' vs 'someone'

Can you please tell me what the difference between someone and anyone is? 1- Me:- I can't find my bag. I kept it here. Can anyone/someone please tell me where my bag is? 2- John:- Hey, Do you know that Rita has killed her own son. Me:- How can anyone/someone be so cruel that they can kill their own child. 3- John:- Hey Subha, I have come to know that the king of Xyz land has committed suicide. Me:- It's so strange! How can anyone/someone who has everything can commit suicide?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, Each of those sentences has a different purpose. While the first one is a polite request, the second one is a rhetorical question that expresses surprise. With polite requests, "some" is used instead of "any" when you expect an affirmative answer. "any" is more neutral. In the second question, which contains a typo ( How can anyone/someone who has everything can commit suicide? ), "anyone" means "any person," while "someone" specifically refers to the king who committed suicide.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Boy?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 60. "I would sell a couple of kegs, make $100 in a few hours, and then take the rest of the day off to go to the beach. I had one customer who would buy ten kegs at a time, so every few weeks, when he’d order, I’d make $500 in a day and take the rest of the week off to play and have fun! Boy , was I stupid ! I was stupid for two reasons. One, because I could have made a lot more money back then, and...Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post
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