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July 2020

Some help with mcqs

Hello, could you pls answer these 2 ques below,ive tried answering but its wrong and along with your ans could u also give an explanation,.im struggling to understand y mine r wrong thanksRead More...
Leaving aside the mistakes in the sample paper, which I'm not going to correct, the correct choice is (b) because it's the only one that does not use coordinating conjunctions, that is, linkers that keep both parts of the sentence at the same syntactic level: In (a), you have the conjunction and , in (c), otherwise , and in (d), not only ... but also . All of these are coordinating linkers. That in (b) is not.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

They live for the gossip

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 17. "Let’s look more closely at entertainment. The middle class and the very poor are often Hollywood’s biggest fans. They live for the gossip . They can’t wait to see who did what. They are glued to their television sets." Please rephrase the part highlighted above as I was not able to understand it clearly.Read More...
Crystal clear! Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

being is masked

Hello, Here is a paragraph from TIME Health. I don’t understand the grammatical structure of the underlined part.Does Jane Baseman mean “being masked”? If something is wrong with the sentence, doesn’t the writer have to use (sic)? “What I’ve seen supports things that we already knew, which are that if you’re going to gather, being further apart is better than being stuck close together, that being is masked is better than being unmasked, and that being outside is better than being inside,”...Read More...
OK. Thank you, Gustavo. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Since and ago

Hi, all I read in Oxford Advanced learners' Dictionary that we can use since instead of ago. The example sentence there is : He did it many years SINCE . Could you please spot light on this point ?Read More...

This is not “be positive” hocus-pocus.

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, PP 22,23. "Talking about ideas requires a different vocabulary than the middle class uses. Use words like possible instead of impossible, can instead of can’t, and I will instead of I should. Millionaires have positive vocabularies. This is not “be positive” hocus-pocus. Words are powerful. Listen to your middle-class friends and you will find their conversations are much more pessimistic than...Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

significance

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 10. "People who can’t love or be patient or kind, people who can’t forgive, and people who get angry easily are very poor emo- tionally. Focus on becoming rich emotionally as well as financially. Becoming rich in your relationships is more than success. It is significance. It is fulfillment ." What does the highlighted part mean? I wonder if you could rephrase the part hihglighted.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

has struggled

Why the sentence below is ended with "has struggled" without extending the activity of the "verb"? Is is consider a hanging statement? But there can be no doubt that India has struggled. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/0...-intl-hnk/index.htmlRead More...
Again, Joshua, it would really be good for you to learn to ask questions in English. You have been on this forum for a good many years. I would really like to see you master this basic skill, which will doubtless help you in your career, insofar as it seems to require that you speak English, at least on a very basic level. Did you mean to ask, " Why does the sentence below end with . . .? " I don't know what you are trying to ask. "Has struggled" is the verb phrase within the "that"-clause...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

depand vs depanded

Why it is not written as "Health care is depended on investment in state capacity."? Health care depends on investment in state capacity.Read More...
Hi, Joshua—You have titled this thread "depand vs depanded." I think you intended to type "depend vs depended," since neither "depand" nor "depanded" is a word in the English language. When questions are formulated in English, Joshua, subject–auxiliary inversion needs to be used. It is ungrammatical to ask, " Why it is not written as XYZ? " Subject and auxiliary need to be inverted: " Why is it not written as XYZ? " That sentence, which is perfectly correct, cannot be changed to " Health...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Him or his

Shostakovich’s Fourth Symphony had hardly entered rehearsals when the political climate turned against the composer and made his having the piece performed impossible . (Source of this sentence: Shostakovich’s Fourth Symphony ). made his having the piece ... I hoped him fits here. However, an expert named Tommy Wallach had said his , not him , fits here. He also explained the reason. But I cannot understand at all what he said. The sentence I have mentioned above belongs to a very old post...Read More...
That's an excellent way to paraphrase the construction, Gustavo. Nousher, it may interest you to know that your original example can be paraphrased in the same way: The political climate made it impossible for Shostakovich to have the Fourth Symphony performed. The political climate made it impossible for Shostakovich to have an orchestra perform the Fourth Symphony. Because of the political climate, it was impossible for Shostakovich to have the Fourth Symphony performed. Because of the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Yet what

Is the sentence below meant "what is not yet done is troubled by the huge size of what hadn't been done"? Yet what needs to be done is haunted by the magnitude of what was not done. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/07/18/opinions/india-coronavirus-failures-opinion-intl-hnk/index.htmlRead More...
Joshua, in the affirmative we say: - The sentence below means XXX. To form the interrogative, we have to use the auxiliary does : - Does the sentence below mean ...?Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

I have seen

From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 7. "When I first started thinking year to year, my income really started to increase. I asked myself questions like: How can I double my income this year? How can I legally pay less in taxes this year? As I have seen this principle of long-term thinking in the lives of my mentors, it has challenged me to look further into my future. I now have business plans that go twenty years into the future. I spend...Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

But in Bollywood...

But in Bollywood, 𝗱𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗹𝘄𝗮𝘆𝘀 𝘀𝗼𝗺𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗵𝗮𝘀 𝗺𝗮𝘆𝗯𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵𝘁 . For example, for me, 𝗶𝘁 𝘄𝗮𝘀𝗻'𝘁 𝘂𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗹 𝗜 𝘀𝗮𝘄 𝗗𝗶𝗹𝗷𝗶𝘁 𝗗𝗼𝘀𝗮𝗻𝗴𝗵 𝗶𝗻 𝗨𝗱𝘁𝗮 𝗽𝗮𝗻𝗷𝗮𝗯, where I saw a turban wearing man not being poked fun at in Bollywood film. ▪ Could anyone please explain the meaning of those parts in bold to me? Is the first part in passive? Source: ...Read More...
Hi, Toaha—No, the first part is not passive. "Being poked fun at" is passive: "They are poking fun at him" (active) --> "He is being poked fun at" (passive). The sentences are poorly written. I suspect that the writer hardly speaks English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I am so happy/glad right now....

Is this sentence correct? If it's, then what's the meaning of it? ▪ I am so happy/glad right now that I could ever be.Read More...
If you wish to express gladness at the very possibility of your own existence, Toaha, then you can use the sentence. Is that really what you want to say? If so, "so" is optional, playing no role in the construction besides intensifying "glad."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

road under construction?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P xiv. "Always remember that success is a journey as well as a destination and the road is always under construction ." What does the author trying to imply when he used the part highlighted? My hunch is that he saying that success is a continuous process that never ends. Am I right?Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

have success?

hi, The meaning of our lives is not to HAVE success but to BE successful. What is the difference between having success and being successful? My understanding is that (to have success) is to gain success for a period of time or for a particular job. While (to be successful) means the continuity of success. Am I right?Read More...
Great! Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

three products

Are these sentences correct: 1) He advertised three products of his friend's company. 2) He advertised products of his friend's company. 3) He advertised three products of that stupid company. 4) He advertised products of that stupid company. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, David, No. I don't see any reason why the sentences should not be considered entirely correct, but they just sound a bit strange to me, especially the first two. Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

not in trouble

a. I want to see my son not in trouble. b. I want to see my son not be in trouble. c. I want to see my son not get in trouble for once. Are those sentences grammatically correct? Are they natural? It seems to me that (a) is not really grammatical, but that people sometimes use that kind of sentence. It is as if 'not-in-trouble' is a single unit. I am not at all sure about that... Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Azz—Like Gustavo, I prefer the variations with the "don't want to . . ." or, alternatively, something like this: "I'm sick of seeing my son in trouble." However, provided "not" is strongly stressed, I find the three sentences you have asked about correct and, given the right context, natural as well: A: Have you ever seen your son in trouble? B: He's always in trouble. I see him in trouble all the time. I want to see my son NOT in trouble . For what it's worth, I dislike (b) the most. I...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is going to or is

Could you tell me which one is correct, please? Muhammad is going to learn English, and Hamza is going to, too. Muhammad is going to learn English, and Hamza is, too.Read More...
I like Gustavo's use of "and so is Hamza" and, like him, prefer the second example to the first. I'd just like to note that the first sentence, though awkward, is not incorrect. The awkwardness owes to the "to, too" combination, and that can be overcome by changing "too" to "as well": (1a) Muhammad is going to learn English, and Hamza is going to, as well.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Searched for (the) keywords

Which one is correct ? i searched for the keywords A and B in the list provided. or i searched for keywords A and B in the list provided. and please tell me why ?Read More...
Hi, Anonymous, This is, in my opinion, a rather controversial topic. Although in this case I prefer the first one, I think both can work, depending on how you view the common noun "keywords." If "keywords" is considered the main noun (i.e. the head) in that noun phrase (NP), then "A" and "B" seem to modify the noun "keywords" and the use of the article is justified: the keywords identified as A and B. However, I think it is also possible to conceive of that NP as a unit, in which case the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

past participle

I had been in a band for a year before the audition . In this question was the person still in the band before the audition ?Read More...
Hi, Ilko, With the past perfect simple, it is not clear whether the person was still in a band or not. If we use a verb in the past perfect continuous, then it becomes clear the person still belonged to a band: - I had been playing in a band for a year before the audition.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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