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July 2020

Possessive case

We add ('s) before the word ( day )in possessive case like ( new year's day \ the mother's day) but sometimes we drop it in cases like ( the world donor day \ the field day) my question is when do we use the possessive ( 's ) with day and when do we drop it ? Thanks I advance.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, We had a very interesting discussion on the topic some time ago. You might want to read it here .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

the place where I work

1) Tom knows where I work. 2) Tom knows the place where I work. Are these sentences ambiguous? I see two possible meanings: a) Tom knows the address of the place where I work. Or he knows where my office is (if say we are in the building). b) Tom knows what kind of environment I work in. He knows what kind of place I work in. I'd use '1' for 'a' and '2' for 'b', but I think at the end of the day both sentences are ambiguous. Would you agree with that? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

He could be in the market...

Consider these sentences, please: 1) A: Where is John? B: He could be in the market. 2) It could be dangerous to cycle in the city. 3) Working in London next summer could be a great experience. The three "coulds" in 1), 2) and 3) are very similar, because: a) They look exactly the same. b) They all mean "possibility." c) They can all be replaced by "might." d) They are all "tentative." Q1) Are they completely same? Q2) If not, how does a native speaker of English differentiate among the...Read More...
That does not change their meaning. You can also say: 1) A: Where is John? B: If he's not with you, then he could be in the market.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

lie, lay

Hello, This is the first paragraph of an article from The Atlantic. You may have seen a recent viral video that showed a polar bear in the throes of suffering. The beast seems to be in the final hours of its life—its legs wobbling under its weight, its pupils widened in pain, its yellow fur hanging loosely off its bones—as it gnaws on trash, lays down, and shuts its eyes. My comment: I think the underlined “lays down” should be “lies down” because “lay” is a transitive verb which requires an...Read More...
Hi, David and Apple, Quite by chance, I'm listening to an old song and the lyric contains the very same mistake: Cherish Kool & the Gang Let's take a walk together near the ocean shore Hand in hand you and I Let's cherish every moment we have been given The time is passing by I often pray before I lay down by your side If you receive your calling before I awake Could I make it through the nightRead More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Something is not or even?

I just read this sentence and I'm confused about what does it mean. Consolidating memory is not instantaneous or even inevitable: every memory must be encoded and moved from short-term to long-term storage, and some of these memories are, for whatever reason, more vividly imprinted than others. I know it's saying that consolidating memory is not instantaneous. But following this does it mean consolidating memory is not inevitable or it's inevitable? Any help would be appreciated!Read More...
Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By xtan · First Unread Post

Why spend it performing tasks ~ ?

Hello, Grammar Exchange members! While reading, I ran into the following sentences: We only have so much life force, so much chi, pran, or energy. Why spend it performing tasks that don't match your prewired tendencies? I've been wondering what part of speech the word "Why" is. I know "why" is usually an adverb in an interrogative sentence. But in the sentence above I'm not sure. I understand "it" refers to "life force, chi, pran , or energy" I guess maybe "do you" is omitted between "Why"...Read More...
Thanks for the detailed explanation! I really appreciate it!Read More...
Last Reply By KDog · First Unread Post

Ambiguous subject

How could one rewrite the following sentences to prevent ambiguity? John met Jack when he was exercising. Sammy met Sophie when she was eleven years old.Read More...
Thank you for your reply! I have an unrelated question: Are those commas necessary? If yes, why?Read More...
Last Reply By Former Member · First Unread Post

Past or Passive Form

1. Is "tampered" a past tense verb or a passive form or verb? 2. How did he tampered a witness to implore him to stonewall Congress? I am not clear about this statement, is it due to weak in English grammar? And he tampered with a witness, imploring him to stonewall Congress," Mueller wrote in the op-ed posted Saturday evening. https://edition.cnn.com/2020/07/11/politics/robert-mueller-defends-roger-stone-prosecution/index.htmlRead More...
Yes, Joshua, it is. Good job.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

that

Should we place "that" after "intense" in the sentence below? In some places the crowds became so intense it caused locals, environmentalists and even governments to complain that overtourism was pushing the region's fragile ecosystems to breaking point. https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/southeast-asia-overtourism-coronavirus-intl-hnk/index.htmlRead More...
Hi, Joshua—"That" is optional in this type of context ("It's so hot [that] it burns").Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Instead

The meaning of "instead" in the sentence below is "other than that" or "contraditory" or "contrary" or "nevertheless", or " in contrast". Which one is appropriate? Instead, its main evening news bulletin praises the government and Mr Duda daily and attacks Mr Trzaskowski, accusing him of being in cahoots with Jewish and LGBT interest groups.Read More...
Hi, Joshua—You appear to be quoting an article in your post; however, you have not placed the quotation in quotation marks (or mentioned the author's name, or the title of the piece of writing from which the quote was taken). That makes it look as though you are asking about a sentence you yourself have written and are uncertain of the meaning of a word that you have chosen to use. I am not going to take the time to search for the article you are quoting, since you should have provided a...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

write off?

hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 95. "Perhaps the greatest advantage of owning your own business is the tax advantage. Business owners can write off several things that you can’t as an employee. I am not a tax attorney or tax strategist, so I will not offer advice here, but you absolutely must learn about the tax advantages you are entitled to as a business owner." Does (write off) mean (reduce) or (delete) or what exactly?Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

donate to causes?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 88. "Millionaires get up, do what they love, spend time with their families, donate to causes they believe in, travel to exotic places, and continually look for investments to increase their net worth." Could you please give the possible words that mean the same as the highlighted parts? ThanksRead More...
thanks a lotRead More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

resumptive pronouns?

Can sentences 1-5 be used for the given meanings: 1) Tom and Sally, the police arrested them. (Meaning: The police arrested Tom and Sally.) 2) Tom and Sally, do you think the police should arrest them? (Meaning: Do you think the police should arrest Tom and Sally?) 3) Tom and Sally, I want to see get out of jail. 4) Tom and Sally, I want to see them get out of jail. (Meaning: I want to see Tom and Sally get out of jail.) 5) Tom and Sally, do you want to see them get out of jail? (Meaning: Do...Read More...
Hi, Navi, I think (1) can work, with "Tom and Sally" being a dislocated object. I'm not so sure (2) can work the same way as (1), because the pronominal object is inside a content clause and that sets it too far apart from the expanded object. I think (3), (4) and (5) can work without "get." You might want to read a recent related thread about preposing and dislocation .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Total

Hi everyone! May I have a question? After the word "total" as adjective, we use plural or single noun? For example, if I write these three sentences, which is correct? 1. There are 20% out of the total students choosing science field. 2. There are 20% out of the total student choosing science field. 3. 7% out of the total profit is distributed to shippers.Read More...
Hi, Moon Le, We generally use "of," not "out of," with percentages. By the way, your question about the singular or plural form should be related to the statement of percentages, not to the presence of the adjective "total." Notice you can eliminate "total" and your doubt remains: 1'. There are 20% of the students choosing science. 2'. There are 20% of the student choosing science. 3'. 7% of the profit is distributed to shippers. (2') is incorrect. You need the plural "student s ." If you...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

went

which is correct:1- They went to the doctor complaining of chest pains. 2-They went to the doctor to complain of chest pains.Read More...
Hi, zonzon, Both are grammatically correct, but different in meaning: (1) means they went to the doctor's while they were complaining of chest pains (time), while (2) means they visited the doctor for the purpose of complaining/in order to complain about chest pains (purpose). I'm not sure that "complain" is the verb speakers would naturally use in the circumstances. Perhaps they wanted to ask about the chest pains they were experiencing.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Why do some people...

Which one is grammatically and naturally correct? Please explain. 1. Why do some people ask questions on Quora for which answers could easily be found by searching on Google? 2. Why do some people ask questions on Quora to which answers could easily be found by searching on Google?Read More...
Thanks 😇Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

pays handsomely?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 80. "Millionaires have also developed the special skill of getting people to work well together, which pays handsomely. It is a skill, however, that takes time to develop. It is the ability to get people to embrace one another’s differences and to assign the right person to the right position." Does (which) refer to the (special skill) or to (getting people to worl well together)? In other words,...Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

The trauma will be...

What does this part of the sentence below mean? "for things to be the same/normal" ▪ The trauma will be too heavy for her for things to be the same/normal . Is the sentence below correct? If it's, what does it mean? I am confused about how this interrogative sentence below formed. Are two questions merged in one sentence? ▪ Where was she without me for this to even be possible?Read More...
Yes, you can say that, with a slight change of meaning: 1. The trauma will be too heavy for her = She will go through an excessively traumatic experience. 2. ... for things to be the same/normal for her = She will find it hard (or impossible) to get back to her normal life.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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