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August 2020

the same as

1. This is the same car that you bought me . (Does it mean only one car exists?) 2. This is the same car as the one you bought me . (Does it indicate to two cars? One is the current one we are looking at, and the other is one you bought me?) 3. This car is the same as mine . (Is it correct? Does it indicate to two cars?) 4. This is the same car as you bought me . (Is it correct? Does it indicate to only one car?) All the followings options confused me. All they mean same to me. I cannot...Read More...
I had to wait for some days to get response for the above topic. But the explanation I have seen now is really helpful for me. Probably Azar Grammar Exchange is the only site where we can see this sort of detail explanation. It is the best site I have ever seen.Read More...
Last Reply By Nousher Ahmed · First Unread Post

to infinitive as a subject

Hello I know all the three sentences below are grammatically correct, but sentence 3 sounds a bit awkward to me. Is it only me that feels this way? Speaking English is not difficult. It’s not difficult to speak English. To speak English is not difficult. When an infinitive is used as a subject of a sentence, it almost always sounds a bit unnatural to me. To watch baseball games is fun.(unnatural) Watching baseball games is fun. It's fun to watch baseball games.(better) The only example that...Read More...
Ah.... I see. Thank you. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Necessarily

Hello, Can the adverb necessarily be considered to be an intensifier? For example in the sentence below, does it provide some emphasis to the word mean? If you yawn, it doesn't necessarily mean that you are tired. Thank youRead More...
You're right. As you can see, leaving out "necessarily" results in a sentence that does not reflect the truth: when we yawn, it usually means we are tired.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

What kind of sentences are these?

Hi everyone, I'm new to Grammar Exchange and I hope someone can help me with these two sentences. "Eat a lot of vegetables 'and' you will be healthy" "Eat a lot of vegetables 'or' you will no be healthy". I have not clear if they are subordinate clauses or not. Thanks in advance for your help and have a great day.Read More...
Hi Gustavo, first of all my apologies for the typo, and second thanks for your reply. I though about them as some kind of conditional, since one sentence is a consequence of the other one. But I couldn't find any specific information related to them. Thanks again for answering my question.Read More...
Last Reply By Felipe · First Unread Post

Might be and might have+past participle

Hi, What is the difference in meaning in the sentences below. a) the figure doesn't seem right, it might have been doubled up. b) the figure doesn't seem right, it might be doubling up. Thank you in advance!Read More...
Hello, Tony—Both (a) and (b) incorrect because they are run-on sentences. Can you spot where the first sentence ends and the second begins in each example? "It might have been doubled up" speaks of a process as having possibly occurred in the past; "it might be doubling up," of a process as possibly occurring now.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

If someone had to die, I thought it should be me.

Is the sentence below in second conditional and indicate future? ▪ "If someone had to die, I thought it should be me," he later told his parents.Read More...
Hi, Toaha—The image you posted was inappropriate (even more inappropriate than your "rape" post from yesterday), so I deleted it.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Walker pushed her back..

▪ Walker pushed her back and let the dog attack him, sustaining several bite injuries to the face. Could anyone please explain is "sustaining several bite injuries to the face" a participle or absolute phrase? It would be better if you could break the sentence and explain it.Read More...
Yes, you're right.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Lots of people are very interested....

Could anyone please explain why the writer used "being" in the first sentence but not the second one? ▪ Lots of people are very interested in politics. People who vote, follow current events, and register with political parties are 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 political. On the other hand, some people don't care about such things: 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥.Read More...
Thanks 😇Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

How and where noun should be placed when we compare using "as much as"?

1a) He doesn't have as many books as you have. 1b) He doesn't have books as many as you have. 2a) Jim doesn't eat as much chocolate as I do. 2b) Jim doesn't eat chocolate as much as I do. 3a) He likes hockey as much as basketball. 3b) He likes as much hockey as basketball. Do a and b mean same? And are they both correct? If I don't make mistake 1b and 3b are wrong but 2b is correct (while word order is same for all 1b, 2b and 3b). I can feel the reason but cannot say the exact cause. Will...Read More...
Great job, Gustavo. Just so Nousher is clear about what you've explained, I'd like to clarify that "eating as much chocolate" and "eating chocolate as much" are not different ways of saying the same thing but have totally different meanings. In the second formulation, in which, as Gustavo points out, "as much" is adverbial, "much" can be replaced by "often": " Jim doesn't each chocolate as often as I do. " But this does not work: * " Jim doesn't eat as often chocolate as I do ." In "eat as...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Different ways to say

Hi! Can someone help with rephrasing this: " We are creating an incredible communication that you've never experienced before, by making easy to handle, yet cutting-edge Technology."Read More...
I still don't like "incredible," and I prefer the original "yet" over "but." I'd also do without "developed": Establishing your communication like never before through easy-to-handle, (yet) cutting-edge technology.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

attached

Which one is grammatically right? (a) Please find my feedback as attached file. (b) Please find the attached file in this email. (c) Please find the file as attached. (d) Enclosed herewith the attached file as my feedback. (e) My feedback is enclosed as attached file.Read More...
Hi, Joshua, I'd go for (a) and (e) with a minor addition: a'. Please find my feedback as an attached file. e'. My feedback is enclosed as an attached file. I suggest: f. Please find attached a file with my feedback / Attached you may find a file with my feedback.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Evolve/evolving

Hello, I asked my sister the source of $10K deposited into her bank account. Initially she told me it was a lottery winning, later on she told me it was a disposal of her shares, 2 days later she told me, it was a sale of her car, a week later, she told me it was a gift. So in short, she keeps changing her story. I wanted to use the word "evolve" in this context. And because it is a matter of fact, which of the following sentence is more correct. A. Her explanation evolves B. Her explanation...Read More...
Hi, Tony, I'd use what you said at the end, She keeps changing her story . Speaking about the evolution of her explanation sounds like too much.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Important that sb complete or completes

Which of the following is correct? =>It is important that himel ------------ his tasks =>complete or completes ? Any help will be appreciatedRead More...
Hi, @youknowwhowantstolearn, and welcome to GE. And thank you, Ayman, for your contribution. Both answers are possible (provided that Himel , which is a name, is properly written with a capital letter). With the adjective "important," I think that the present indicative ( completes ) can mean that the person usually completes his tasks (this is something he does, and that is important: (The fact) that he completes his tasks is important ), while the present subjunctive ( complete ) means...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

In the traditional way.

Is it correct to say 'in the traditional way?' For example: 1) Do you guys butcher animals in the traditional way or with machines? 2) We still prepare rice in the traditional way. We don't use rice cookers.Read More...
Yes, I find it to be more idiomatic. I know this search is not 100% accurate but if I google rice the traditional way I get 436,000 results, while I get only 89,800 if I type rice in the traditional way.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

not too comforting

Hi, P. 7 from Who Rules The World? By Noam Chomsky. Meanwhile, scarcely a day passes without new reports of ominous scientific discoveries about the pace of environmental destruction. It is not too comforting to read that “in the middle latitudes of the Northern hemisphere, average temperatures are increasing at a rate that is equivalent to moving south about 10 meters (30 feet) each day,” a rate “about 100 times faster than most climate change that we can observe in the geological...Read More...
Clear. Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Leap ahead

What's the meaning of "leap ahead" in the picture below?Read More...
Hi, Toaha—Rape, as you know, is a sensitive issue. Unless there is a very good reason to take rape as an example in a grammar discussion, it would be better to use less sensitive topics. Soon I hope to post forum guidelines to which we can link members when threads like this get posted. Regarding the sign, I don't think it's well written; the meaning is not obvious to me. The sign's use of English strikes me as nonnative. As to the meaning of "leap ahead," the phrase calls to mind the first...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammar

Thanks a lot in advance Is this structure correct gramatically and semantically ? He has been gone for three hours , I don't know where he is . Notice :If you consider " be " the main verb and " gone " is an ajective , it means that he disappeared and turned up again , so why one says " I don't know where he is . Thanks a lot . thatRead More...
Hello, Rasaa960—Your example is a run-on sentence, featuring a comma-splice. Apart from that, the example is correct. The comma must be changed to a period: He has been gone for three hours. I don't know where he is. The sentence "He has been gone for three hours" can be used either in the circumstance in which he has just returned or in the circumstance in which he is still gone. In your example, the sentence carries the latter meaning. Please attend to the mechanical errors I have...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

First grade grammar question (verbs)

I'm embarrassed to admit that I'm struggling to explain to my 6 year old son why one of his answers was marked wrong in a recent test. The test asked them to underline the verb in each sentence. For this example: "Peter loves eating cookies." My son underlined "eating", but the teacher corrected this to "loves". Help!Read More...
Thank you David. Yes, I do believe the question could have been written a little better!Read More...
Last Reply By DME · First Unread Post

"While" plus gerund OR gerund only

Hello, Would you tell me if I need "while" in the following sentence? He would send a letter of request to the publishing institutions--all levels of government (while) focusing on ministries and national agencies, research organizations, and learned societies. Thank you very much!Read More...
It seems I misused the term, gerund. The title of my question should have been "While" plus present participle OR present participle only." Your second paragraph solves another issue I had thought about: time vs. contrast. Thank you so much for your highly informative explanations and for making my sentence clear! On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 8:42 PM The Grammar Exchange < alerts@crowdstack.com > wrote:Read More...
Last Reply By Kina · First Unread Post

Do/Take classes.

Do we say 'do classes' or 'take classes?' For example: 1) I do/take accounting classes online nowadays. 2) Did you do/take the class yesterday? 3) I cant' talk right now. I'm doing/taking a class. I've heard 'take' in a few shows but is it the same for both teachers and students?Read More...
Ashraful, in (3) you should use "lesson" (see what David explained to you). Also, "taking accounting class" (without an article) is not grammatical.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post
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