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August 2020

Why won't you/don't you.

1) "Why won't you stop bullying/listen to me!" 2) "Why don't you stop bullying/listen to me!" I want to know the difference between the two sentences. To me 1 is a little more intense than 2. 2 can be either out of frustration or just a question and 1 is it bit harsher.Read More...
Thank you. I think I get it now. 1) Why won't you listen to me?= He doesn't listen to the teacher and the teacher is asking why he persistently refuses to listen to him. / 2) Student: No I won't to come to class on time. Teacher: Why won't you come to class on time.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

for - since the summer

Hello. Could you help me choose the correct word? Why? - I haven't seen my grandfather (for - since) the summer. Thank youRead More...
Yes, "since" is the correct choice here: "I haven't seen my grandfather since the summer." The speaker saw his grandfather during the summer but hasn't seen him since. The period between the summer and now is a period during which the speaker has not seen his grandfather. We would NOT say, " I haven't seen my grandfather for the summer ." However, if the summer ended three months ago, you could say, "I haven't seen my grandfather for three months ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Channeling

What's the meaning of "channeling" in this context? ▪ This was Kamala Harris's moment to tell her story. It was personal and powerful. But it was also a universal channeling of American values. She spoke to the stakes of the moment, the urgency for action, and a path that she argued will turn this nation's dreams into realityRead More...
Hi, Toaha—Please remember to cite the source of any quotations you use at this site. To channel values in a speech is to use the speech as a metaphorical channel through which one lets those values flow.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Relative Pronouns & Relative Clauses

Hi there, I am confused with the function of Relative pronouns. I have read on multiple sites that relative pronouns introduce relative clauses. However, only Adjective clauses are referred to as Relative Clauses. Some Noun clauses also start with relative pronouns but are not called as Relative Clauses. Why is that? Example : You can marry whomever you like . If that is the case then the function of Relative pronouns is not definitively introducing clauses because that is common for both...Read More...
Hello, Mounica, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. The relative pronouns who and which can introduce, and the relative pronouns who(m)ever, whichever, what and whatever always introduce nominal relative, or fused relative clauses, which can be understood as formed by a noun or pronoun and a relative clause: - You can marry who((m)ever) you like . - You can marry the/ any person (that) you like . - You can buy what(ever) you like . - You can buy the thing/ anything (that) you like . - You...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

regret (going - to go)

Hello. Could someone help me choose the correct form? - Do you regret (going - to go) to the party? Than you.Read More...
Yes, the answer is " Do you regret going to the party ? ," not " Do you regret to go to the party ? " When there is or may be regret for something that has already occurred, we always use either a (finite) "that"-clause or a (nonfinite) -ing clause. "Do you regret going to the party?" means the same thing as "Do you regret that you went to the party?" The formal use of "regret to VP" is confined to verbs of speaking. "Regret to" is almost invariably followed by verbs like "inform," "tell,"...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

We are in Monday.

Look at the following post on Instagram: - Career Consulting & Coaching on Instagram: “#lavitadolce and we are in Monday again! The Good news that from this week we will start Saturday #TeaTime together! How does it work? I…” My question is: Is this usage of "in" before "Monday" considered correct in formal and standard English? I think it’s because of “we are.“ Actions happen “on” Monday. But in these cases, the speaker/writer is referring not to an action but to a location on a...Read More...
Hi, Freeguy—"It is Monday again" would have been much better than "We are in Monday again." Also possible are "We have reached another Monday" and "Monday has returned." Normally we speak of doing things on a certain day of the week. However, "in Monday" would be possible in reference to a calendar box—"We are still in Monday," for example.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I have finished since 12 o'clock.

Hello. Is using the present perfect in the following sentence correct? - I have finished since 12 o'clock. Thank you.Read More...
That's a very good point, David. I understand that the action or, rather, the state extending between 12 o'clock and now — which justifies the use of the present perfect — is the existence or nonexistence of projects in a completed status, the sentence above being somehow similar to: - Since 12 o'clock there has been only one project finished by me. (which is of course much less idiomatic than the sentence above)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Increase my shareholding in "XYZ" company

What is the best way to describe, I am slowly/gradually increasing my shareholding in a company. Do I say: I have gradually increased/ascribed my shareholding(s) in XYZ company, I now own almost over 60% shareholding in the company.Read More...
I agree with Gustavo's points above and would like to add that your example sentence is a run-on sentence containing a comma-splice error. There should be a period or a semicolon, not a comma, after "XYZ company."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

No more asking nicely, This is not a drill

What's the meaning of these two sentences? 1) No more asking nicely. 2) This is not a drill.Read More...
Hi, Toaha, You were asking for something nicely, but now you are declaring that you have changed your strategy and wouldn't use that nice way again. You have stopped it forever. According to this site: https://hinative.com/en-US/questions/265664, it means "This isn't practice, this is the real thing." For a further explanation, see Urban Dictionary here: https://www.urbandictionary.co...is%20not%20a%20drillRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Is there any grammatical or punctuational..

Is there any grammatical or punctuational mistake in this picture?Read More...
No, it's not necessary. The whole text is formed by phrases, not sentences, so you don't need to join those last two phrases with a comma. Yes, you could also say "all the while" there. The diference is "all the while" is a noun phrase that works as an adverb (similar to "all the time"), while "all while" is parsed as two words: "all" refers to all the actions mentioned before, and "while" is a conjunction ( all these things she did while she was holding a baby).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Reconcile to, reconcile with, reconcile against

Are Reconcile to, reconcile with, reconcile against the same in meaning/usage? Kindly correct me if my sentences below are incorret? 1. The journal entry you recorded in your new software is not reconciled to the new accounting software. 2. My figures are not reconciled with your figures. 3. At the end of the financial year, your loan amount is reconciled against the management fee payable to you. Thanks heaps!!!Read More...
ReferenceRead More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

If only + could have spoken

Hello. Which one is correct? Why? - If only she (could speak - could have spoken) Spanish, we'd be able to communicate. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, The clause "we'd be able to communicate" refers to the present or future, so you need "could speak" in the condition. Compare: - If only she could speak Spanish, we 'd be able to communicate. - If only she could have spoken Spanish, we would have been able to communicate.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

This was not in your case

Any grammatical error in my phrases below. Clause 2.1 of the trust deed requires units redemption to be made in writing, but this was not in your case. When I say, this was not in your case, does it mean, you did not comply with the trust deed requirement or it means it applies to everyone, except you. Any better way of phrasing that context?Read More...
Hi, Tony C, In the absence of further context, I don't find the past "was" to be justified. I'd say: Clause 2.1 of the trust deed requires units [I wonder what they mean by "units"] redemption to be made in writing, but this is not so in your case / but this does not apply in your case. or Clause 2.1 of the trust deed requires units redemption to be made in writing, but this is not your case / but this does not apply to your case.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

scope of negation

1) They used this word for someone who was not a member of their group or was a new recruit. 2) They used this word for someone who was not a member of their group, or a new recruit. 3) They used this word for someone who was not a member of their group or a new recruit. Can '2' or '3' be used instead of '1'? I don't think '3' works. It seems to me that '2' might. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

I had/have a question.

I was on the phone with someone and I said: - "I had three questions." I don't know why I said 'had' instead of 'have' but I think people do say 'had' in this type of context? Please correct me if I'm mistaken.Read More...
Yes, it is possible to say "I had three questions" without any explanation. The explanation for the tense will implicitly be provided by the context, assuming you have a contextually sensitive listener who speaks English. Now, before you ask me, "What if there is no context?," let me assure you there is always a context.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

After saying something, I sit...

Do these sentences have the same meaning? ▪After saying something, I sit, look at the water and drink it using my right hand in three breaths to quench my thirst. ▪After s aying something, I look at the water and drink it using my right hand in three breaths to quench my thirst while sitting (down) . ▪After s aying something and looking at the water, I drink it using my right hand in three breaths to quench my thirst while sitting (down). ▪After saying something, I sit and use my right hand...Read More...

The gerund & the inf.

Would you kindly clearify this point? 1- Does the (v+ing) works the same as ( to + inf) at the beginning of the sentence)? I came across this sentence from the IELTS: ( To understand - Understanding) electricity depends on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic particles......... The answer was ( Understanding) .My question is: Why does (to understand) not work here?Read More...
I agree with Gustavo that the gerund works much better in this case. Ahmed, it's important to realize that an infinitival clause's coming at the beginning of a sentence does not necessarily mean that the infinitival clause is functioning as the subject of that sentence. While it is unusual for infinitival clauses to work well as the subject of a clause, independent or dependent, it is not unusual at all for such a clause to be used at the beginning of a sentence when it functions as an...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

heavily studied on A, but few on B?

Hi, I would like to ask if the following sentence is understandable: "The effect has been studied heavily on A, but few on B" The complete sentence should be "The effect has been studied heavily on A, but the effect has been studied few on B" I know that a clause should be after "but", but I just feel that it somehow makes sense. Can people understand this even if it's grammatically error?Read More...
Hi Gustavo, Sorry for the late reply. I have read the "heavily" part, but I just want to understand if the grammar is correct so I didn't change those words. Again, thanks for pointing out another grammar error and giving me advises. I have understood how to write it now.Read More...
Last Reply By yan · First Unread Post

such as

Can anyone please advise me as to which of the following is correct? 1. In some developing Asian countries such as China the population has risen considerably over the past fifty years. 2. In some developing Asian countries such as China, the population has risen considerably over the past fifty years. 3. In some developing Asian countries, such as China, the population has risen considerably over the past fifty years.Read More...
Thank you very much David, your explanation is very clear and a great help.Read More...
Last Reply By Steven 123 · First Unread Post

Can I say “Do you enjoy the film?”

Hi. I have a question about two words enjoying and like I wonder which is correct or both are correct: Do you enjoy the film? Are you enjoying the film? What's the difference between like and enjoy in this case. If people say Do you like the film, why can't we say do you enjoy the film?Read More...
Thank you very much. It helps me a lot. Now I understand.Read More...
Last Reply By alexandra · First Unread Post
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