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August 2021

require

Which are correct: 1) They demand a visa to let foreign citizens enter their country. 2) They demand a visa to enter their country. 3) They require a visa to let foreign citizens enter their country. 4) They require a visa to enter their country. Does '4' mean they have to have a visa to enter their country or that they require that the people who want to enter their country have a visa? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Without background knowledge, (4) could mean either one. Compare to: "They require help to finish their homework." But in your case, since it would be absurd to be required to have a visa to enter your own country,... (4) is the best choice.Read More...
Last Reply By lagrange · First Unread Post

of being

50 years of being an actor. Of dreaming big and never giving up. Still dreaming bigger. Of being better every day. Never being satiated. Of never tiring. Of forever being hungry to play the next great character. Forever striving to find the next great film. Of wanting to be known more as an actor than a megastar. Of loving cinema and the craft more than any actor I’ve met. Of inspiring millions. Of influencing generations. Of leading only by example. Of sticking to your morals and traditions...Read More...
What is this from, Grammar Man? Surely you didn't write that yourself.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Correct wording

Is it correct to say I don’t know what your taste are or should you say I don’t know what your taste is?Read More...
Hello, Beverly, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. "Your taste" is a singular noun phrase, so you should say: - I don’t know what your taste is . but - I don’t know what your taste s are .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Either to compare three cases

Dear GE, I appreciate if you could let me know how to use either to compare three cases, A, B and C in a sentence. In this sentence: A: agriculture share is less than 20% B: services share is less than 50% C: both A and B So if I write this as ...In these countries either their agriculture share is less than 20%, or the services share is less than 50% or both..., is it correct ? Also please let me know how this is the case for neither e.g. (hypothetical) ...In these countries neither their...Read More...
Hello, AnstonRoy, According to The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style (2005 edition), the correlative conjunctions "either ... or" can be used for more than two elements. On page 157 we can read: When used as a conjunction, either can apply to more than two elements in a series: She left her glove either at the convenience store, the library, or the playground. Either the union will make a counteroffer or the owners will close the factory or the mayor will intervene.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

would never even + was & would have never even +PP

Dear GE, Are these two sentences give the same meaning ? Could you explain the grammartical roots of these sentences ? His insights we would never even imagine was a lifesaver. His insights we would have never even thought a lifesaver.Read More...
Hi David and Ahmed, Thank you for your replies. @David, Moderator Thanks a lot for your in detail explanation It clearly helped me understanding the difference between We would never even imagine his insights were a lifesaver. (corrected case [1]) and His insights we would have never even thought a lifesaver. Also David, if you find time please post a reply to my Either to compare three cases question.Read More...
Last Reply By AnstonRoy · First Unread Post

Get up and run

Do I say get up and run or get up and running in the context below. Please fix my computer issue as soon as possible so that I can get up and run/running.Read More...
Hi, Cristi—Both ways are wrong. In this context, it is not you, but your computer, that needs to be "up and running." Please get my computer up and running as soon as possible.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the only way ... is if...

Hi:) I have never gotten to listen to one of those Parental Warning CDs, because Mom and Dad never let me buy them at the mall. So I realized the only way I was gonna get a chance to listen to Rodrick's CD was if I snuck it out of the house. (from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney) The use of "if" above is grammatical and correct? As far as I know, "If" has two uses. 1) used in conditional clauses as adverbial clauses 2) used in interrogative clauses as nominal clauses(in this case, if the...Read More...
Thank you for your consideration. Those examples have also been written down in my notes.Read More...
Last Reply By WinD · First Unread Post

which vs. whom

a. Five of my friends, one of whom is an engineer, were arrested at the march. b. Five of my friends, one of which is an engineer, were arrested at the march. Are the above sentences both grammatical? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, Only (a) is grammatical, because "friends" refers to people and requires "whom." "Which" can only refer to things or animals.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Amidst versus amid

What is the difference between amidst and amid? e,g, I hope you and the family are well amidst/amid the pandemic lockdown.Read More...
Hi, Cristi—"Amid" works like "among" and "while" in that all three can naturally take the -st ending in British English ("amidst," "amongst," "whilst"). In American English, though, the -st ending is usually felt to be unnatural with those words.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the use of that's the case

If you set up a CFC in overseas jurisdiction e.g. in Germany, the financial results of the CFC will not form part of your tax consolidated group, although that is the case for accounting purposes. In the above sentence, when I say that "that is the case for accounting purposes", I believe it means for accounting purposes, it will form part of the consolidated group for accounting purposes. Let me know if I have understood incorrectly.Read More...
Yes, Tony. Your interpretation is correct.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Forty minutes as a noun

Hello everyone on the Grammar Exchange. Is the phrase forty minutes a noun? I believe that forty is both a noun and an adjective, and minutes is a noun. So, if we put them together, would the phrase be counted as a noun, or is there another term for it? Forgive me if it seems like a trivial question. Thank you for your help.Read More...
Hi David. Your explanation is very clear and helpful. Many thanks for your help.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post

Gerund or To-infinitive

To ask why you read might be as stupid as (to ask/asking ) why you eat. I made up this sentence, but I am not sure which one I should use . In case both are OK, what is the difference? I'd appreciate your help in advance.Read More...
I think I come to learn a new thing each time. Thank you for your elaborate explanation.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

one in four people

Is 'one in four people' singular or not? Does it depend? Thanks!Read More...
According to Bryan Garner, such constructions are always singular, and the use of the plural verb with them, when they're the subject, is a common mistake: In Garner's "language-change index," he ranks the use of, e.g., * one in three believe for one in three believes at Stage 2: "widely shunned."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

known or renowned

In the following sentence, should I use known or renowned? e.g. At ABC Pty Ltd, we are renowned or known for our reliable business advisory services for savvy business owners.Read More...
Hi, Tony, you can use either 'well-known for' or 'renowned for', but 'renowned' sounds better because it means famous, especially for a particular thing or activity. (LDOCE)Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Verb Agreement while Using 'Kinds of'

Hi dear fellows, Would you be kind enough to let me know which one of the sentences bellow is correct and why? 1 There is two kinds of soup. 2 There are two kinds of soup. Should the verb agreement follow the uncountability of 'soup' or the plurality of 'kinds of'? Best regards, Kazembakhshi, KavousRead More...
Oh dear! Thanks a lot! I understand now.. 😊💙Read More...
Last Reply By 3996 · First Unread Post

Comma before but

Hi Everyone. Should there be a comma before but in the sentence below? You may not have realised this but you use adjectives all the time when you speak or write. Thank you for your help.Read More...
Hi, rasaa960 and thank you so much for your response. You're correct. A comma is necessary if but connects two independent clauses. My sentence :↓ You may not have realised this but you use adjectives all the time when you speak or write. I'm quite certain that the clause after but in the sentence above is independent. However, I'm not too sure if the clause that precedes but i.e. " You may not have realised this " is a complete and independent sentence. That's why I posted this question.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post
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