September 2018

Correct structure of "...as....as" sentences

Which is the correct structure when I use......as....as in a sentence? No poet is as renowned as William Wordsworth is. No other poet is as renowned as William Wordsworth is. My grammar books says and many websites also say that 2 is grammatically correct though I have seen both are used in daily conversations by both native and non native speakers. Can anyone please explain If 1 is grammatical and if I can use both?Read More...
By the way I would like to ask if the following sentence is all right: No other poets are as renowned as William Wordsworth (is). Many thanksRead More...
Last Reply By tonyck 2 · First Unread Post

Tenses

Hi David Appreciate your prompt response. I am with you on this one no matter what other forums say. I would have never answered the question the way I put in my post. It would have been far too brutal and harsh unless intended to shock the interlocutor. The question was simply meant to elicit a reply regarding the choice of tenses. My view is that students struggle with many areas of English grammar (the articles and tenses in particular) because there are very few textbooks that do not...Read More...
Last Reply By Katze · First Unread Post

Wouldn't

Hello, I ( wouldn't / didn't) leave the office until I had checked that all the doors were locked. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Dear Abdullah and Ceedhanna, I can't thank you enough for your kind words. They mean the world to me. I am glad you can appreciate that even a native-speaking grammar expert will occasionally miss the mark in his judgment of particular sentences. My knowledge of English grammar has grown a lot while I have been contributing on this forum, first as a normal member, then as a Contributor, subsequently as a Co-Moderator, and finally as Moderator. And it continues to grow. A good friend of mine...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Suitable preposition

Hi there, can anyone please tell me which prepositions are correct in the following sentences? The teachers in this school have always been with me. They have helped me to make/take major decisions regarding/about/of the school. My mother is my inspiration. She encouraged me to take/make major decisions about/regarding/of/in my life.Read More...

In two years' time

Hi, In two years' time, I ( will study / will be studying / will have studied / am going to study / am studying ) English at university. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Menem, I am in complete agreement with David's reply, except for the fact that he appears to have overlooked your fifth option, "am studying". This is the only one of the choices you offer that does not work grammatically in the context of your sentence. I'm guessing that this is a workbook or test question, so that you are not allowed to change any part of the rest of the sentence. If this is not the case, I suggest changing "In two years' time" to "Two years from now". I don't think it...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

So & such

Do we use "so" or "such" in a sentence like this :"There were (so - such) many people at the restaurant that they had to wait in a queue ."Read More...
Gustavo, Certainly, (c) works. What I was thinking of in (a) and (b), was a sudden, brief noise that was so loud as to be startling or actually frightening, such as that of an explosion, whereas (c), to me, implies sustained loud background noise, which we've all experienced. When I used to go to bars, I went to socialize (unless I was actually there to see a concert). But some of the bartenders liked to blast the music so loud, it was impossible to have a conversation. Your point about...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Present perfect & present simple

This sentence is taken from a book in Egypt that provides exercise based on grammar. "since his mother (is - has been) ill, he will clean the flat for her.Read More...
Emad, Only "is" works here. We can see "since" as meaning "because". However, I would find this more natural: Since his mother has been ill, he has been cleaning the flat for her. Here, "since" means "from the time that". But that doesn't seem to be an option in your textbook. Thanks for letting us know that this was from a textbook. It must be very large and heavy if it provides exercise. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

three times

1) I tried to send him an email three times. 2) I tried three times to send him an email. 3) On three occasions, I tried to send him an email. Do these mean that I tried to send him the same email three times? Might it have been different emails? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Navi, In all three of your examples (all of which, as near as I can tell, mean exactly the same thing), I find both interpretations possible. Either you tried to send him three different e-mails, or you tried three times to send him one specific e-mail. As always with you, there is a lot more ambiguity lurking in the shadows. For example, do you mean to say 1a: I tried to send him an email three times. And I was successful each time! Praise God! Each e-mail received a prompt, polite, and...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Until is or until is not

Which sentence is correct: 1) You can always redo the process until the system is activated. 2)You can always redo the process until the system is not activated. Meaning that before the system activation, the process can be repeated as many times as needed. Thank youRead More...
Louis, You want (1) here. (2) doesn't really make sense, but it seems to be trying to say that, while the system is activated, you can redo the process as needed until the same system is de-activated, or shut down. This appears to be the opposite of your intended meaning, as you state it. May I ask where your questions come from? Thanks. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Once is or has been?

Hi All, Which of the below two sentences is correct? Many thanks 1)Once the item is inserted, it can no longer be removed 2)Once the item has been inserted, it can no longer be removedRead More...
Louis, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I somewhat prefer "has been", but "is" works also. It's the same type of construct as: Once you're gone, you can't come back. --Neil Young, "Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)" What doesn't work in either example is "no longer". This implies that the item could be removed before it was inserted. Instead, go with: Once the item (is/has been) inserted, it can't be removed. Also, neither one is really a sentence without a period at the end. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Search function

Can we conduct key word searches? I remember that we could do so in the previous version, but it seems that the search function is now gone. Also, where is the log out key located?Read More...
Thank for your replies, David. Those were blocked by a pop-up bar. I can see them now.Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

the theater come to life

"it will be like the theater come to life." from a Korean English textbook What is come doing here? Is it a past participle or verb? Is it similar to 'dream come ture'? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Kis, It's hard to talk about this use of English in isolation. You've said that it comes from a Korean textbook, but you have not provided the context in which the sentence appears; nor have you punctuated it as a sentence. We can't even tell if this is in fact an isolated sentence. Did you forget to capitalize the "i" in "it," or are you quoting a fragment of a larger sentence? In the absence of context, and without knowing whether "it will be like the theater come to life" is a...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"The other + noun" vs "All the other + noun"

What's the difference between "the other + noun" vs "all the other + noun" in the following sentence? John is smarter than the other students in the class. John is smarter than all the other students in the class. Paris is more beautiful than all the other cities in the world. Paris is more beautiful than the other cities in the world. To me they mean the same because in the above the other students implies all the other students and the other countries implies " all the other countries ".Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, Yes, "the other student / countries" means the same thing as "all the other students / countries." That is, both pick out the same set of beings / entities. That doesn't mean it's bad or dumb to use "all." It may be technically redundant here, but it adds emphasis and clarifies that all the others are in fact meant.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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