Skip to main content

September 2020

What is the word which means the opposite of "nest"?

Hello, I need help. Here is an easy short story written by L.A Hill published by OUP. The title of the book is “Elementary Comprehension Pieces” After the story there are some exercise. One of them is as follows. Find words in the story which mean the opposite of: ugly b hard c slowly d awake e nest. I can easily find the answers for a,b, c, d but what about e? What is the word opposite of “nest”? Is there one in the following story? I cannot find it. I thought it was an error. The writer...Read More...
Thank you always, David, for your further comment. I also thought of the possibility of "nest" being a verb, but I still couldn't find the word opposite to it. But then, I doubted myself thinking there might be another meaning for "nest" I didn't know. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Spend the vacation/class/night.

Is it correct to say: "You spent the entire class answering the short questions?" Is it correct to say things like: 1) Spend the entire class. 2) Spend your vacation. 3) Spend the night/evening. Does asking this type of question mean that I want to know whether someone enjoyed the evening/vacation and/or what activities they did?Read More...
Thanks for the answers as always.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

Omission of articles for brevity

I have seen sentences without articles in notes and signs. I'd like to know rules regarding when to omit them. Can I simply omit all of them? Here is my example. "This serial title should be re-cataloged as (a) monograph: (the) subtitle, indicating (the) publishing group's 30th anniversary, is inappropriate, given that (the) succeeding issue celebrates (the) 40th anniversary." Another question is what level of informality does the omission of articles give to those reading? Thank you very much.Read More...
Thank you very much! I will do that.Read More...
Last Reply By Kina · First Unread Post

"That" as a relative pronoun after a possessive determiner?

Here is the sentence I am struggling with: "DataFriend is our software that maximizes your efficiency." My gut says this is wrong. If the sentence said the software or a software or just software , I'd be on board. But using "that" as a relative pronoun when the noun we're defining is preceded by a possessive determiner... feels wrong. The thing is, I don't know why it feels wrong. Is there a grammar mistake here?Read More...
Aha! That helps. I see it now! "DataFriend is our software." Period. Already defined. Versus, "DataFriend is the software." Craves a defining clause. Thank you for your insight, kind stranger. I'll probably go with some version of your second suggestion.Read More...
Last Reply By Maynor · First Unread Post

The table below or the following table

The table below shows the discrepancies in calculations of the unit holding percentage between the A Trust unit register and the A Trust's 2020 income tax return. or The following table shows the discrepancies in calculations of the unit holding percentage between the A Trust unit register and the A Trust's 2020 income tax return. Which one is correct? and whether there is any difference in meaning?Read More...
Definitely, David. Where I said that "the following table" is used to refer to a sequence, I did not say that what precedes it may not be just text instead of another table, in which case it will be equivalent to "the table below." If there is any difference between both phrases, I think it might just be that "the following/that follows" will refer to something coming immediately afterwards, while "below" may refer to something physically appearing in a lower position on the page, though not...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Got down/have gotten down

Hello, Sir! I am a little puzzled regarding the following sentence: ''I got down to the car and remembered you had your phone.'' Why doesn't the author use present perfect, given the fact that it is a finished action with a result in the present? Thank you very much!!!Read More...
Thank you @Gustavo for your answer. After having read more about past simple, I have understood the reason that the author use this tense— the actions happened consecutively in the past( got, remembered, had)Read More...
Last Reply By Schianu · First Unread Post

Manufacturing or Manufactured

Hello Sir. I have a question about words. If I want to say it is a factory where people made steel or some kinds of material. What word I can use in this situation? I've already had two words in my mind. -Steel-manufacturing plant. -Steel-manufactured plant. Could you tell me which is correct, please. Can you suggest other word with the same meaning.Read More...
Thanks my learned Sir. This is absolutely right, but I only gave another noun, and not to form "steel- manufacture," with this.Read More...
Last Reply By IKhan · First Unread Post

Who/Whom

Hi, One of my students wrote the following sentence in an essay earlier this week: "[…], and it affects the speaker whom speaks the language" I must admit that I struggle a bit with the use of who/whom in this context, even though I thought I knew the rules for this quite well. Would you say that this use of "whom" is correct since "the speaker" can be said to be the object in the sentence?Read More...
Hello, EngTeach, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I completely agree with Gustavo's answer. One good way to explain this, apart from focusing on the clause within which the relative pronoun is used ("who speaks the language"), is to relate the point to personal pronouns and case. Pronouns have case, subjective or objective. Subjective-case pronouns (like he, she, we, I, they —and who ) are used in subject position, and objective-case pronouns (like him, her, us, me, them —and whom ) are...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"Another world is possible" - really?

One of the slogans associated with the Fridays for Future movement is "We are unstoppable - another world is possible!" To me this sounds wrong: it sounds like literal translation from German. Shouldn't it be "a different world is possible"? At least for those of us who do not own real estate on Alpha Centauri this is the only world we've got. Thus, since we don't have another one we can move to we have to build a different world here on good ole Earth. Then again, the slogan "another world...Read More...
David, thanks for your fast answer. I have to admit I found the same examples in the trusted old print-version of the Shorter OED in my study. However, a quick, non-scientific survey of the native speakers among my Facebook friends (all Americans) came to the same conclusion I had started out with: 'another' used in this way sounds odd. Maybe we can say that this is a rather archaic or at least old-fashioned usage. Anyway, my students in English class today (year 11, 7th year ESL) enjoyed...Read More...
Last Reply By Tandemrider · First Unread Post

tasted or be tasting

Hi there When I ......... the food, my mouth got burnt as it was so hot. ( tasted - was tasting ) I think that PAST CONTINUOUS is the correct answer here. What do you think ?Read More...
Hi, Dr Ahmed—I see why you added the winking face now. Initially, I thought it was a typo. But then I saw the discrepancy between what you have there and Ahmed_btm's quotation of you, which had the choice "was tasted." I then checked to see whether you had edited your post after Ahmed_btm posted his response, and of course you had. In the future, if someone points out something you didn't mean to type, please correct it in a subsequent post. I agree with Ahmed_btm that the active voice is...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

As much as

I came across these sentences in which ( as much as) is used when I expect to use ( as many as) and vice versa: 1- This is half as many as trusted him six months ago. 2- We just grabbed as many as possible. ( Collins dictionary) 3- Some of these fish can weigh as much as 80 km. ( practical usage) 4- Elephants can e as much as 10 feet tall if not more.Read More...
Yes, you can use "as much as" instead of "as often as," but they are not the same. While "as much as" refers to the intensity, "as often as" describes the frequency of those actions.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

who, whom

Hello. are the following sentences correctly written with commas? 1- The man, whom I borrowed some money from, was helpful. 2- The man, who I borrowed some money from , was helpful. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, There should be no commas here. This is a defining clause. The man (whom / that) I borrowed some money from was helpful. The man from whom I borrowed some money was helpful.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Had It Burst

ahmad
Hello, everyone, My cousin had an internal cyst that burst yesterday. My cousin who had an internal cyst had it burst yesterday. My cousin with an internal cyst had it burst yesterday. Are the above sentences acceptable? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot, sirs.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Where and Whereby

Can the above words be used interchangeably? e.g. The table below summarises all the credit entries with an explanation in the case whereby the credit amounts have been adjusted. Thanks!Read More...
Yes, that sentence is possible and means: - The table below summarizes all the credit entries with an explanation in those cases where the credit amounts have been adjusted. (which I find clearer)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I found some burdock seeds stuck to my sweater.

What type of sentence is this? I found some burdock seeds stuck to my sweater when I returned from the mountains. Is it #1 S (I) V (found) O (some burdock seeds) C (stuck to my sweater) ? or #2 S (I) V (found) O ([that] some burdock seeds stuck to my sweater) ?Read More...
Hello, mmaassuu, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. The example sentence that you have given follows neither of those patterns. The "stuck to" phrase is a reduced relative clause modifying the direct object: I found some burdock seeds (that were) stuck to my sweater . . .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

request/ask/ask for/ask about

Hi there, what's difference between "Ask", "ask for", "ask about" and "request" in the following sentences? 1- Hey John, I am not sure but I think we are somewhere in the middle of our destination . Let's stop and request/ask/ask for/ask about directions. 2- I ask Peter about/for his age. 3- I request Peter his age.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—Sentence (3) is totally ungrammatical, (1) is natural only with "ask for" ("ask about directions" doesn't work), and (2) would be better without "about" or "for." You can simply say: 2a-I ask(ed) Peter his age. That sentence has the double-object construction, which you tried to use, unsuccessfully, in (3). The double-object construction works with "ask" but not with "request." Another natural way of phrasing things here is to use: 4-I asked Peter how old he was.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

He has submitted report , He is submitted report, He submitted report

Sir, pls let me know how to differentiate these words in sentence form He has submitted report , He is submitted report, He submitted reportRead More...
Hello, joshitha, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I'm not sure what you mean by "differentiating these words in sentence form." You don't know how to parse them? Anyway, none of the sentences is correct. Being a singular count noun, "report" needs an article ( a or the ). Also, the second sentence is ungrammatical. In the passive, you should say: - A / The report is submitted to him. If you clarify what you need, we might be able to help you further.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I said, "Don't attack me please." or I said, "don't attack me please." ?

is "Don't" capitalized in this case? I don't think so but want to be sure. Grammarly is saying both are correct. Thank you.Read More...
Hello. Robbie Rob, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Since "don't attack me, please" is a complete sentence, when quoted in direct speech it should start with a capital letter, as all sentences do. Therefore, you should write: I said, "Don't attack me, please."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

scope of negation

1) He didn't like all of the guests. 2) He didn't like all the guests. 3) He couldn't stand all the guests. 4) He couldn't stand all of the guests. Could these sentences ever be used instead of: 1a) He didn't like any of the guests. 2a) He didn't like any of the guests. 3a) He couldn't stand any of the guests. 4a) He couldn't stand any of the guests. respectively? I think that could only happen in informal spoken English with a particular emphasis. Generally, the meaning would be 'some but...Read More...
Hello, Navi—I agree with you. With special emphasis (on "all of the guests"), the meaning could shift from "some but not all" to "not any." I agree with you on that count, too, but I think the "all of them together" possibility holds for both the "didn't like" and the "couldn't stand" sentences. Navi, you may be interested in this similar thread , started by Azz. Coincidentally, you and Azz happen to be testing the same hypothesis at the same time.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

all of the pets

a. Tom couldn't stand all of the pets his housemate had, so he moved. b. Tom couldn't stand all of the pets, so he moved. c. Tom couldn't stand all the pets, so he moved. Could these be used if Tom could stand all of the pets individually, but it was the fact that all of them were together that was unbearable for him? He liked each pet individually, but it was the combination that got on his nerves! Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz—Yes, the sentences could definitely be used in that case. Compare: Tom couldn't stand all the cars on the street. It seemed there was never anywhere for him to park. He often had to park on neighboring streets. Ultimately, he decided to move to a less crowded part of town.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

pedestrians are hard to see

Hello, 1. It is hard for the drivers of the cars behind the bus and vehicles coming in the opposite direction to see (the) pedestrians in the crosswalk. 2. Pedestrians in the crosswalk are hard to see for the cars behind the bus and vehicles coming in the opposite direction. Does sentence 2 grammatically work? I don't think so. Can you say "pedestrians are hard to see?" when the drivers see them? Can "cars" see them? Is there a better sentence ? Thank you. AppleRead More...
Thank you so very much for your replies, David and Gustavo. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×