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September 2020

The use of capital letter

Hello, I am confused as to why the Registered Holders in the following sentence needs to be in capital. e.g. The Trustee must maintain an up-to-date register of all Registered Holders ( the Principal Register") showing: 1. 2. Thanks in advance!Read More...
Yes. You may find "for the purpose of ..." when followed by one specific purpose, for example: "for the purpose of meeting this requirement ..."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Article "the"

The source of the fund to pay my school fee arising from the sale/sale of my property in Mexico. Is it necessary to use article in this sentence?Read More...
Thanks David, your explanation is very clear. But I just need to clarify one more thing. What about the following sentence? You contend the two deposits made to you on the 1 January 2000 or 1 January 2000 from XYZ company representing a return of the capital. Should I use the or without the before 1 January 2000?Read More...
Last Reply By Cristi · First Unread Post

not a little

Are these sentences correct: 1) That movie was not interesting and boring. 2) This book is not a little disturbing and extremely pretentious. 3) This book is not a little disturbing and pretentious. In '3' does 'not a little' modify 'pretentious'? In '1', should one place a comma before 'boring'? Would a comma before 'and' change things n '2' and '3'? 4) This book is not a little disturbing , and pretentious. 5) This book is not a little disturbing and also pretentious. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, David, for your kind replies, Can one save '1' with a comma? 1a) That movie was not interesting, and boring. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

so many times that

Which are correct: 1) We want to score so many times that our rivals just give up. 2) We want to score so many times that our rivals will just give up. 3) We wanted to score so many times that our rivals just gave up. 4) We wanted to score so many times that our rivals would just give up. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi—All four sentences are correct, but (1) and (3) have subtly different meanings from (2) and (3). In (1) and (3), the (wanted) scoring in matches is such that the rivals quit in advance of subsequent matches. In (2) and (4), the focus seems to be on individual matches. The (wanted) scoring is such that the rivals will just give up after taking a beating for a while in the individual matches.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Two gerunds

Is it possible to use two gerunds at the same time which is used in this sentence? ▪"Giving a 20-minute speech in a second language standing up for the most hated man in the world is really brave.Read More...
Hi, Toaha—Technically, there are no gerunds in that sentence. (Where have you taken the sentence from? Cite your sources, cite your sources, cite your sources.) The subject phrase (comprising every word up to "is really brave") is, however, headed by an - ing form ("giving") that functions as as substantive. The second -ing form "standing" heads a participial phrase functioning as a reduced relative clause. There is nothing wrong with either phrase or with the sentence. It means: "It is...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

enjoy or enjoys

The sentence "Who enjoys their maths classes?" is correct. But how about "Who enjoy their maths classes?" Is it also correct?Read More...
According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) , maths is colloquial British and math is colloquial North American. That is, both maths and math are colloquial ways of referring to the subject of mathematics as studied at school. The formal international word for math/maths is mathematics . To be prim and proper internationally, we can speak of mathematics courses or of courses in mathematics . There are few Britishisms I dislike more than maths, but it exists.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

heavier than

a. This box is heavier than I can lift. b. He is stronger than I can beat. c. He is better than I can win against. d. This task is harder than Tim can do. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Azz, IMHO, all these sentences seem unnatural .Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

passed him by/ had passed him by

Hello. Could you please tell me which one is correct and why? Thank you very much. 1. The seventy-years-old man looked unwell, skeletal , trapped into the body of a person that life had passed him by.. 2. The seventy-years-old man looked unwell, skeletal , trapped into the body of a person that life passed him by..Read More...
Hello, Schianu—Neither sentence is correct. The past perfect ("had passed") works better than the simple past, but both sentences have four problems. First, "seventy-years-old man" should be "seventy-year-old man"; we do not use the plural in that construction. Second, "trapped into the body" is awkward conveys the wrong meaning; you should use "trapped in" or "trapped inside." Third, you should not have a space before the comma after "skeletal." Never use a space before a comma. Also, never...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Can you proofread/parallel structure

Dear Grammar Experts, Could you help me proofread the following parallel structures, so that it would sound authentic/ not awkward? 1)I believe that the role of the Archives of Criminology and Forensic Sciences scientific journal is fundamental as it is published in five languages, that helps domestic science integrate into the international scientific space, and our scientists and practitioners share experiences, personal views and scientific judgements. 2) I am sure a further period of...Read More...
Gustavo, thank you so much for your comprehensive answer! Appreciate it a lot!Read More...
Last Reply By DoraD · First Unread Post

With construction

Hi, I have some questions about the following sentence. - This bring us unprecedented opportunities as well as unprecedented challenges ,with the former outweighing the latter . 1. Is the "with" structure here adverbial, or a modifier? 2. Is "with" optional? Regards, Robby Zhu.Read More...
Hi, Robby Zhu, Please note the correction above. "with" introduces an absolute construction above. I'm not sure if the preposition is mandatory, but my impression is that it is highly advisable as it helps the sentence flow better. Absolute constructions usually function as adverbial modifiers. In this case, I'd say it is a sentence modifier.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Please may you

The sentence "Please may you print this for me" is obviously incorrect; it should be "Please will you...", or "Please could you...", or simply "Please print..." However, I don't know what the grammatical rules are that govern this. I've seen it suggested that the modal verb "may" can't be expressed in the future tense. Can someone educate me, please? :-)Read More...
Yes, Gustavo. Excellent. Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By anthonymarrian · First Unread Post

AstraZeneca

Are these sentences grammatically correct? Do they sound natural to you? 1) AstraZeneca suspended its trials for the Coronavirus vaccine because one of the trials' volunteer fell ill with an unexplained illness, even so we're hoping against hope/cling to the hope that it will become successful. 2) AstraZeneca suspended its trials for the Coronavirus vaccine because one of the trials' volunteer fell ill with an unexplained illness, even so we're living in the hope of its being successful. 3)...Read More...
As you know, Toaha, we are not a proofreading or copy-editing service. If there is any specific question you have, please let us know.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

after - until

Hello. Could you please tell me the correct word? - She didn't begin cleaning (after - until) all the guests had left. Thank you.Read More...
The first sentence can mean that she started to clean some time later. The second sentence does not say that. Remember you don't need to use the past perfect after "after." You can say: - She didn't begin cleaning after the guests left. - He didn't join the university after he finished school.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

handed - had handed

Hello. Which tense is correct? Why? - After he (handed - had handed) the answer sheet, he realized that he hadn't written the seat number. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, As we have said on this forum countless times, with "after" the past perfect (which expresses past before past) is redundant, so the past simple is preferred. In this context, I prefer the phrasal "hand in": - After he handed in the answer sheet, he realized that he hadn't written the seat number. Since the subject in both the time and the main clause is the same, it would be more idiomatic to say: - After handing in the answer sheet, he realized that he hadn't written the seat ...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

The use of whilst and but

I am confused when I should use whilst and but. Can they be used interchangeably. Here is my sentence: Based on the settlement adjustment sheet the total amount due on settlement of your property is $1M, but/whilst you have stated, on 1 October 2020, an amount of $1.5M was withdrawn. It is unclear where the remaining half a million was directed to.Read More...
Hi, Cristi, Both "but" and "while" (or the more formal "whilst") can be used to express contrast and are often interchangeable. The difference is that "but" can be used to contrast facts or actions (at the same or at a different level), whereas "while" is mostly used to contrast actions at the same level. In your paragraph above, you are contrasting facts (the fact that the amount due was $1M with the person's statement about an amount of $1.5M having being withdrawn), so "but" is, in my...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

You state that or you stated that

Hello, Please kindly correct me if my understanding the below is incorrect. In general you use a present tense, e.g. you state that (as it is general truth), but if you want to convey/emphasize when the person makes the statement the you use past tense as per the example below. e.g. On 1 September 2017, you stated that it is your understanding that the company director has not changed since the company was established on 1 January 2000.Read More...
Thanks Gustavo!!!Read More...
Last Reply By Tony C · First Unread Post

using at which,in which and where.

Hello, From my research I have found out that at which , in which and where can all be used to refer to a place. For example. I can say: London is the city where I was born. I can also say it this way: London is the city in which I was born. They express the same thought. However, when I say : London is the city at which I was born then this doesn't sound right or grammatical. My question: Is there a context/ situation or rule that determines when I can us at which to refer to a place. I am...Read More...
Thank you for the clear answer.Read More...
Last Reply By Mrchuffie · First Unread Post

Stand

I am confused about the meaning of "stand" here? Does it mean "to defend or suport a person" or "to be on someone's feet"? ▪Giving a 20-minute speech standing up for the most hated man in the world in a 2nd language is really brave.Read More...
Hi, Toaha, In (1) , "standing up for ..." states what the speech expresses, or describes the attitude of the person delivering the speech. In (2), "to stand up for ..." expresses the purpose of the speech.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

English Grammar

Hello! Is the following sentence grammatically correct? "The more time he spent speaking to her, the more seconds, in which he could have evolved, were lost."Read More...
OK, see if you can identify the improvements I have made in this revision: The more time he spent speaking to her, the less time he had to evolve.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

cleaning

Which sentence is correct? I managed to clean the house with one cleaning or I managed to clean the house in one cleaning.Read More...
Hi, Ilko—The sentence works much better with "in" rather than "with": I managed to clean the house in one cleaning. We use "in" when speaking of doing things in a certain amount of time: I managed to clean the house in two hours. "One cleaning" works similarly in that it may be said to indicate a time period.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

English Grammar, Sentence rules, perfect present tense

Hello!! I have been thinking about the usage of present perfect. Are these sentences grammatically correct? I would also like to know how to improve them. Thank you very much. ''You have lectured me on what I have done. You cooked 5 five pancakes when I had a temptation to steal one of them. The reason why you have scolded me is because you want to teach me a lesson''Read More...
Hi, Schianu—Your use of the present perfect in those sentences is OK. There are two main problems with what you have written. First, the second sentence doesn't make sense; you probably mean that the addressee had (already) cooked 5 pancakes when you had a temptation to steal one of them. The past perfect ("had cooked") is needed. As you have written the second sentence, it indicates that the addressee started to cook a bunch of pancakes at the time of your temptation! Second, the third...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The usage of "As" being compared to other words

I'd like to discuss as to why these usages of As are correct. My main focus is going to be in comparing it with how and the relative pronoun that Starting off with As vs How : Why isn't how used in these three instead? As far as I know, how is used to saying "In a way something happens/is done", so I am confused because of that. Moving on with questions regarding the usage of and difference between As and That I don't know why that is used in here, for instance: It really confused me. Could...Read More...
Hi, Harry, This is an interesting question that had never crossed my mind. English speakers never confuse "as" and "how" but are not perhaps aware of the rule that prevents them from using one instead of the other. I'll make an attempt to come up with some rule. In embedded constructions, "how" is equivalent to "the way (in which)." For example: - This is how you do it. (This is the way (in which) you do it.) "how" can also introduce relative clauses after nouns like "way," and in this case...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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