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September 2021

Comma

Hi, Which sentence(s) is/are correct: 1-"It is a nice, red Italian table." 2-"It is a nice red Italian table." 3-"It is a nice, Italian table." 4- "It is a nice Italian table." I think (2) and (4) are correct because they are cumulative adjectives.Read More...
Dreamy Irene has given you a good answer, Ahmed.A.A. I'd just like to add that sentence (1), with its comma between "nice" and "red," is not incorrect if the sentence is intended as a different way of saying: It is an Italian table that is nice and red. "Nice" is an adjective that is often coordinated with other adjectives. For example, a student might hope for a test that is nice and easy (nice 'n' easy) . In attributive position, we we'd say the student hopes for a nice, easy test .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

noun clause or phrase

My dilemma is that these sentences are spoken words that I transcribe but I can't make sense out of the clauses and phrases that are modified. I'm restricted to finding the correct punctuation for the text that is taken from spoken words. Do you have any suggestions? In the sentence below, "which they hope often is forever" is a relative clause but where is the noun phrase or clause that it modifies. I understand that ordinarily, a comma would come after "can." Thanks!! One of the...Read More...
Gustavo to the rescue!! Thanks, Gustavo!!Read More...
Last Reply By clueless · First Unread Post

on earth

Hi, What does the sentence mean? "What on earth are you doing" When can we use it? Thank you very much for your help.Read More...
Hi, Kuen, "On earth," just like other expressions such as "the hell," "the heck," "the f***," can be used to reinforce any "wh"-question: - What on earth are you doing? - Why on earth are you doing it? - Who on earth told you to do it? - How on earth are going to do it?Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

those of you who

Which are correct: 1) Whichever of you hand in a flawless paper will get an A. 2) Whichever of you hands in a flawless paper will get an A. 3) Whichever ones of you hand in a flawless paper will get an A. 4) Any one of you who hands in a flawless paper will get an A. 5) Whichever student hands in a flawless paper will get an A. 6) Whichever students hand in a flawless paper will get an A. Which can be used instead of a) Those of you/those students who hand in a flawless paper will get an A.Read More...

were and have been

Which of the below sentence is appropriate? (1) All comments were thoroughly perused and all relevant comments have been well revised. (2) All comments have been thorughly perused and all relevatn comments were well revised.Read More...
- Correction: (2) All comments have been thoroughly perused and all relevant comments were well revised. - May I know what is the difference between first and second setence?Read More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

"....at post"

I have received this email: "We accepted the case to be processed at post and will call the family once we receive the file electronically so that they may do the interview at post Cairo." My question is does"at post"mean "later"? ThanksRead More...
"We"refers to"U.S. Embassy and Consulate in Egypt" and the case refers to "Diversity visa lottery case".Read More...
Last Reply By izzathanna · First Unread Post

Coordination

Such paraphrases highlight the fact that two predications are expressed in [5], for now they are located in separate clauses. ( Quoted from CGEL P. 218) Context: [5] i Ed seemed quite competent. ii She considered Ed quite competent. [6] i It seemed that Ed was quite competent. ii She considered that Ed was quite competent. Such paraphrases highlight the fact that two predications are expressed in [5], for now they are located in separate clauses. Question : Is a "and" needed here? I read it...Read More...
Hi, Robby zhu—It is wrong to insert "and" there. "For" means "because" there.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

result or purpose?

Source Green Friday is about changing the way we see this day and switching our mindset from “buy, buy, buy” to finding alternative ways to give gifts during the holiday season, so we don’t cause further damage to the Earth. Which one is the meaning of <so> in the sentence? 1) so (that) = and thus or 2) in order that I think it's 1) due to the comma but both look OK to me. 3) Can both be possible? Thank you in advance.Read More...
This part of the sentence may be both result and purpose, but I tend to lean more towards "so" in the meaning of "thus". As for me, the variant "in order that" sounds unnatural in this case.Read More...
Last Reply By Dreamy Irene · First Unread Post

can vs could

To leave the township for work in the city, or for any other reason, you had to carry a pass with your ID number; otherwise you could be arrested. ( from Born a Crime) If I turn the tense into the present, do I have to use 'can' instead of 'could'? When it comes to expressing 'future possibility', does 'could' suggest something tentative, therefore sound less likely? Thanks.😊🍎Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng— No, you don't. But you have to change "had to" to "have to." Yes, that's right. You might want to consider using "may" instead.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Usage of the word substitute

1.Police investigators substituted Palmer’s bag for a smilar one, then followed him to his hideout. https://www.macmillandictionar...merican/substitute_1 Hi, Gramatically speaking, I can make this paraphrase with "replace": 2.Police investigators replaced a similar one with Palmer’s bag, then followed him to his hideout. But I don't think that's what investigators usually do. So I'm confused. I want to make sure which bag is with Palmer after the substitution. Thank you.Read More...

had talked / would talk

In the past, governments (had talked/would talk) about solving problems, but they didn't use to do anything. In the above paragraph, I want to know which is the right answer, ''had talked or would talk''. I think it's ''had talk''. But I need an explanation. Pls somebody, help me. Many thanks in advance.Read More...
Thank you, David.Read More...
Last Reply By Pone Nya · First Unread Post

Modification in noun phrase: which is the head

Children who play truant from school are unimaginative. A quiet day's fishing, or eight hours in a cinema seeing the same film over and over again, is usually as far as they get. (New Concept English, Book 2) How do you parse the bold part? Which modifies which? Which is the head? Thank you.Read More...
What a helpful reply! Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

Will see & will be seeing

Hello sir, I'll tell Hani about the party. I ( will see - will be seeing) him at work anyway. I am a bit confused because Cambridge says that we can use "will"to refer to an event that often happens while the same source mentions that" will be + v+ing“ refers to a routine activity. From these both uses, I see no difference between the two options in this sentence. Thanks in advance.Read More...
What makes you think telling someone about a party requires seeing that person more than once? If I see a person regularly at work, I know that I will likely see him the next time I go to work; and when I do, I can tell him about the party. You are absolutely wrong to think that the simple future is incorrect here.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

a silly question

I was looking up a word, all of a sudden, this silly question just came up in my mind, "Do native speakers always ask why or teachers always tell them why, like when they are learning 'burst into tears' and 'burst into song', do they wonder why tear is used in plural while song isn't, or they just memorize them as fixed phrases without questioning?"😂 I know it's a silly question, but it might influence the way I'm learning English, so, sorry to bother you guys and thank you.Read More...
Thanks, David. 😊Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

Help you move forward or help you moving forward

Hi, Which of the below is grammatically correct? Please get in touch with us so we can talk about how we can help you move forward or Please get in touch with us so we can talk about how we can help you moving forwardRead More...
Wow, thank you for enlightening me. I suspected the second one could have a different meaning. I've seen <moving forward> in one of the sentences in the letter which a school teacher sent to parents. but I didn't know that it meant <in the future> or <from now on>. Never have I realized my ignorance more than I do now. I really appreciate your precious teaching.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

whose belongings

a. He is the man all whose belongings were destroyed. b. He is the man all of whose belongings were destroyed. Which of the above are grammatically correct? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz—Sentence (a) is incorrect; you can't say "all whose." Sentence (b) is correct but cumbersome and awkward. It would be better to delete "of" and position "all" between "were" and "destroyed": c. He is the man whose belongings were all destroyed.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Which sentence of the following isn't correct? and why?

a) She complained that her son always arrived after midnight. b) She complained that her son had always arrived after midnight. c) She complained that her son was always arriving after midnight. d) she complained that her son would always arrive after midnight.Read More...
Hi, Mohamed, I remember answering this question before. https://thegrammarexchange.inf...-sentence-isn-t-trueRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

would

My mother is as stubborn as she is religious. Once her mind's made up, That's it. Indeed, obstacles that would normally lead a person to change their plans, like a car breaking down, only made her more determined to forge ahead. The paragraph above is from <Born A Crime> by Trevor Noah. In the third sentence: 1. Does the word 'would' mean a typical behavior as in, "She insists that she was innocent, but then she would say that, wouldn't she?" (from LDoCE) 2. It is about a typical...Read More...
Yes, it can, but "would" is more tentative. It's more or less the same difference as the one between: - You would expect her to say that, wouldn't you? - You will expect her to say that, won't you?Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

many

The Complete Novels Liquid Sociology Infections of the nose and throat have as much to do with our behavioral, psychological, and social environment as they do with the presence of the infectious organism If a thing is true, you have as much to do with it as any parson in England I have two questions. 1 Could "many" work in place of "much" ? 2 Does it make sense to use " have many to do with" in other contexts? Many thanks.Read More...
Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Dude · First Unread Post

love you so much

1) I don't know why I love you so. Does that mean: a) I don't know why I love you the way I do. or b) I don't know why I love you so much. In this case, at the end of the day, the difference is immaterial, I suppose, but the question is whether 'so' can be used instead of 'so much'. Could 2) I don't know why the police questioned me so. mean 2a) I don't know why the police questioned me so much. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

happy

1. I'm very happy to learn English. 2. I'm very happy to be learning English. 3. I will be very happy to learn English. Can 1 be used to mean both the notions of 2 and 3? Thanks.☕️☕️☕️Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng—Sentence (1) does not really work at all. The construction of (1) is used for things that can be completed in a relatively short period of time. For example, I can say, "I'm happy to answer this question." But learning English is not such an activity. If the learning had already taken place, you could say: I'm very happy to have learned English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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