All Forum Topics

analysis

I don't want it to get scratched going upstairs. I=subject don't want=verb it=object to get scratched= modified the direct object going= adjective that modifes 'to get scratched' upstairs=adverb Have I analyzed correct? Thank youRead More...
welkins, my friend, if you don't mind my saying, analyzing an English sentence doesn't always prove as helpful as it might. For the purposes of learning or teaching English (whether ESOL or EFL), here's the way I would present an analysis -- not that I really like analyzing so much: I = subject don't want = negative verb in simple present it = direct object to get scratched = infinitive verb direct object companion going = reduced form of "while it is going" upstairs = adverb of direction I...Read More...

better

John is better a basketball player than before. John is better a basketball player than he was before. Are they the same? Thank youRead More...
welkins, notice how Jerry changed the word order: John is a better basketball player... . The order is article + adjective + noun. RichardRead More...

want

I don't want the picture put straight. I don't want the pet stay in my home. I don't want the pet play in my backyard. Aret they correct? Thank youRead More...
The first sentence is correct: I don't want the picture (to be) put straight. The second and third sentences need "to" after "want." RachelRead More...

what/if

What the worm was to the corpse, his sin would be to the painted image on the canvas. If the worm was to the corpse, his sin would be to the painted image to the canvas. What is the difference between the above sentences? Thank youRead More...
These example conditional sentences are all correct, but they do not have the same construction as your original second sentence. The last sentence, if you want a conditional, is...If Jane were a nun, John would be a priest. Or, perhaps you mean that Jane is really not a nun, and then the idea of John's being a priest is ridiculous? Then you could say: If Jane is a nun, John is a priest. No way!Read More...

simple or compound

Would the following sentence be considered simple or compound? Stop and think! Thank you!Read More...
Here's a definition of a compound sentence*: A compound sentence is composed of two or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction....or a semicolon. Your sentence has two verbs and two unexpressed subjects, making two independent clauses: (You) stop and (you) think. Rachel _______ *from Simon and Schuster Handbook for Writers, by Lynn Quitman Troyka.Read More...

getting

Jane was getting on her nerve while her little brother was making all the noise. Is the above sentence correct? Thank youRead More...
Thank you very much, Richard. You are right.Read More...

The PASSIVE

joan
Which alternative of the following quizzes is correct? Would you be kind enough to explain respectively why the others are incorrect if one is correct? 1 She found her money ____. (A)steal (B) stealing (C)stolen 2 We had our house _____. (A)paint (B)to paint (C)paintedRead More...
Okay, pups, I'll try to keep this simple and straightforward. The answer for No. 1 is (C). The sentence is, "She found her money stolen." This is what I call a past participle DOC, direct object companion. It's one of seven DOC's used in English. The past participle DOC represents a reduced form of the passive voice. If I paraphrase the sentence, it becomes, "She found that her money had been stolen ." A sentence with a direct object companion always includes these four elements: subject +...Read More...

was or were

In the following sentence, should it be 'was' or 'were'? Her first and last name (was/were) misspelled. Thank you!Read More...
Yes, Jerry is correct. In this case, "first(name)" is one unit and "last name" is another unit. The plural verb is correct. When the two nouns are considered one unit, then it is possible to use a singular verb. From the Grammar Exchange Archives: Q: Should a singular or plural verb be used in the following sentences? (a) There was/were dust and dirt all over the place. (b) Wherever there is/are enough light and water, those plants will grow. Toby Seattle, Washington A: While it is true that...Read More...

fold in ... coated

How do i say in a sentence: (a)Fold in banana slices -------- coated. How do i make a sentence in sense?Read More...
I don't intend to turn the Grammar Exchange into a recipe exchange (although that would be fun!), but I'm attaching two links so you can see the verbs that are used for the process you describe, Vincent. http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/104781 http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/15737 _______ As you can see, the verbs here are "add" and "dip." These verbs show that the bananas go into the batter in order to coat them. The verb "fold" does not describe...Read More...

a great deal of/much

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is it possible to use either "a great deal of" or "much". Thank you. 1. There isn't a great deal of sunshine in my room. 2. There isn't much sunshine in my roomRead More...
Both "much" and "a great deal of" go with noncount nouns, like sunshine. You can use either "much" or "a great deal of" in negative sentences and questions: There isn't much / a great deal of sunshine in my room. Is there much / a great deal of sunshine in your room? However, in affirmative sentences, "much" isn't used much with noncount words. In this sentence -- There is _______ sunshine in my room -- other quantifying expressions are used: There is A GREAT DEAL OF / A LOT OF / PLENTY OF...Read More...

not

HI! I would appreciate if you confirm that the 'not' in bold type is correct or not; 1) We have not leisure of mind to acquire any knowledge... Thanks, MoonRead More...
The link in Jerry's posting directs us to a play that was written in about 1700. More than in British usage, "we have not...." is quite an archaic construction. Swan* notes: "Short question and negative forms (e.g. Have you...?...she has not ) were common in older English. In modern English, they are rather formal and uncommon (except in a few fixed expressions like I haven't the faintest idea. They are not normally used in American English: Have you an appointment? (formal BrE only) Do you...Read More...

omitting the conjunction of participle clauses

joan
Are the following sentences correct when adverb clauses are reduced to participle clauses? (A)When I saw her ,I fell in love with her. → Seeing her ,I fell in love with her. (B)As she is so nice,she has many friends. → Being so nice,she has many friends. (C)If she goes out with me,she will find how nice I am. → Going out with me,she will find how nice I am. Even though I love her ,I have to leave her. → Loving her ,I have to leave her.Read More...
"Seeing her,I fell in love with her." is incorrect? It's not incorrect. It's just not clear with the verb "see" whether you mean "at first sight" or "while I was looking at her." Adverb clauses beginning with when cannot be changed to modifying adverbial phrases? "When" + the -ing form of the verb is possible and correct when clearly understood. "If" can be omitted in conditional sentences as the sentence I did "If she goes out with me,she will find how nice I am."? By omitting "if," the...Read More...

despite

cocoricot
Can I use three following words in this sentence: Students can get a full time job______a part-time job for extra money during their summer vacation. 1.despite 2.regardless of 3.instead of Thank you very much.Read More...
. The only answer that is possible is 'instead of', Cocoricot-- but that leaves us with a sentence that is a little odd semantically. I would think a more expected answer would be a simple 'or'. .Read More...

vital statistics

Dear experts, How would you interpret VITAL STATISTICS in this context: Monitoring pads are attached prior to the surgery to allow the surgical team to monitor vital statistics during the operation. Thank you, YuriRead More...
Should that phrase not be "vital signs"? That would refer to blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, temperature, etc. -- all the indicators of how the patient is doing. From the American Heritage Dictionary: vital signs pl.n. The pulse rate, temperature, and respiratory rate of an individual. RachelRead More...

"to"

Can i say, (A)He pulled the drowing boy (to) the river bank. (b)He sent the boy (to) home.Read More...
(a) This sentence is basically fine: "He pulled the drowning boy to the river bank." (b) Home is one of those few odd words that don't require prepositions, so you should say, "He sent the boy home." Another word that works this way is downtown : "She went downtown to meet her cousin." RichardRead More...

Treat --- care

How do i make a sentence with "treat ... care"? Can i say, (a)The doctor treats his patient with care. (b)He treats a patient well in care. (c)He treats a patient well with a great care.Read More...
(a) This sentence is fine, except you should say patients , the plural form, since this sentence is a general observation. (b) and (c) don't make any sense as they are. If I try to interpret your meanings, I come up with: (b) He treats patients well who are in his care. (c) He treats patients with a great deal of care. RichardRead More...

possessive

Is this sentence correct: 1-He drives here every day in a car of his company. If the company has more than one car, can one say: 2-He drives here every day in his company's car. Does 2 necessarily imply that he uses the same car every day (assuming that the company has more than one car)?Read More...
It's not that "in a car of his company" is ungrammatical, per se; it's simply that native English speakers will never say this. The phrase you'll always hear is "a company car." In English, we prefer using noun adjuncts and compound nouns to using genitive forms. That's just a habit of the language. And, as I mentioned above, I agree that we can probably assume he uses the same company car to drive to work everyday. But this isn't a grammatical question; it's just an interpretation. RichardRead More...

it would be

Could one use: 1-It would be good to work here. instead of: 2-It would be good for you to work here. 3-It would be good for him to work here. 4-It would be good for them to work here. MERRY CHRISTMAS TO EVERYBODY.Read More...
I'm glad that Jerry sees that you have a point. I, on the other hand, don't quite see what the problem is that you're having. If somebody says, "It would be good to work here," the person is making a general observation that could pertain to anybody. That's why the speaker isn't specifying "you" or "me" or anybody else in particular. RichardRead More...

festooned vehicles

Can i say, (a)There were cheering happily for the festooned vehicles.Read More...
That should be " banner -festooned vehicles," not "banners." RichardRead More...

it's time + past tense

It's time we went home. Why do we have to use past tense here?Read More...
I disagree with Jerry's explanation. You can consider "it's time that we went" a hypothetical sentence in which the past is used in a present unreal situation. Consider it to mean, "It would be good idea if we went now." _______ "It's time that he went home" is different in structure from the present subjunctive of "it is required that" or "it is important that" which Jerry is referring to. In Jerry's sentences, this sentence is NOT correct: It's important that we went home now. In sentences...Read More...

Be informed or get informed ?

Dear Rachel , Please tell me which of the following expression is correct ? and WHY ? 1) Please be informed . 2) please get informed . *** If they are both correct , please tell me what is the difference between them ? Thank you very much . SayedRead More...
"Please be advised" and "please be informed" mean about the same thing. "Please be advised" is a little stronger than "please be informed." I have to tell you that my initial instincts about these expressions were not entirely correct. Doing a search for each of them on Google, I found several instances of routine announcements, similar to "please note." So, you can use these expressions in situations other than those that announce bad news. Still, they are typically used in the type of...Read More...

both - either

The teacher told the twins that she didn't want ---- of them in the same class as it would be difficult to tell them apart. A) either B) both C) neither D) some E) every I think 'both' is Ok, but what about 'either'?Read More...
"...she didn't want both of them in the same class..." means that she wanted one of them only. "...she didn't want either of them in the same class..." means that she didn't want this one or that one. I must say, though, that either doesn't really work because it says "the same class." If it said a particular class, like her class, it would make a little more sense. RichardRead More...

'on average every person' versus 'on average a person'

peteryoung
Hi, I wonder whether there are contexts in which 'on average a person' is preferable to 'on average every person', and vice versa? For instance, it seems to me that the following sentence sounds more natural with 'a' as opposed to 'every': (a) On average a person in the middle 20% who makes between $29000 to $46000 a year will get a $27 dividend benefit. On the other hand, the following one strikes me as better with 'every': (b) On average every person in the UK throws away their own body...Read More...
The only difference between the use of a and the use of every is that every is more emphatic IMO, as Jerry would say. RichardRead More...

if vs. when

peteryoung
Hi, Here are three sentences: (a) If asked 'Name the first thing that comes into your mind' when Switzerland is mentioned, most people would probably pick from either 'cheese', 'watches', ... (b) When asked about the law, Snow first stated "I will defer all questions about military personnel policies to the Department of Defense. ... (c) High-sounding phrases, when translated into Basic English, are often deflated in a surprising way. It seems that the "If" in (a) cannot be replaced by...Read More...
I think you're right about (a) and (b), Peter. As for (c), I don't think native speakers would bother changing "are often deflated" with the use of if rather than when . Nor do I think they would perceive a significant change in meaning or connotation. RichardRead More...

bored / boring

Can i say, (a)He felt bored / boring at home alone.Read More...
There are two kinds of verbal adjectives, Vincent, the present participle and the past participle. We use the present participle to describe the doer, the person or thing that is creating the feeling or condition: That movie was so boring that I fell asleep during it. We use the past participle adjective to describe the receiver, the person or thing that is affected: I was so bored during the movie that I fell asleep. RichardRead More...
×
×
×
×