All Forum Topics

'So far as it is'

peteryoung
I'm confused as to the meaning of the phrase 'so far as it is affected by', which appeared in several of translations of one of Kant's work, shown below: Natural and moral philosophy, on the contrary, can each have their empirical part, since the former has to determine the laws of nature as an object of experience; the latter the laws of the human will, so far as it is affected by nature For the former, these are the laws of nature considered as something known through experience; and for...Read More...
Thank you very much, Marilyn. I appreciate your reply. I still have a little difficulty understanding the 'to the degree' phrase. Would you please give some further clue to this? I mean, I assume that 'to the degree by which...' serves as a degree adverbial. Therefore, following your hint, I'll understand the above first example as: the former has to determine the laws of nature as an object of experience. The latter has to determine the laws of human will. But how much (to what degree) does...Read More...

function of dyads

peteryoung
Thank you for paying attention to this post. Please see the following sentence, in particular the highlighted dyads: Whereas the diversity and number of scholars with interests in media literacy have grown rapidly in recent years, the infighting and fragmentation that result from the collision of multiple disciplins and fields continue to create a cacophony of voices that, to a nonspecialist, can make the growth in knowledge and theory about media literacy seem inconsistent and incoherent...Read More...
The subject of unnecessary dyads, or even more so, triads, has interested me, too. I agree that often the second word in the pair is superfluous, and sometimes even serves to dilute the meaning of either or both words. As for style – here, too, the pairing of words may detract from the force the writer would, or should, wish for. In your passage, the repeated pattern of dyads becomes monotonous. Looking at the pairs one by one: "¢ "diversity and number" – "diversity" is different from...Read More...

formal/informal

Can these sentences be used in formal, written English: 1-You saw that where? 2-You were doing what? 3-You talked to him when? 4-You did that how? 5-You did that for what? 6-You did that why? (I think #6 is incorrect even in informal spoken English.)Read More...
Sentences 1-5 would not appear in formal or in written English, except in dialogues. They might be heard in conversations, like this: A: I saw that movie in Siberia. B: You saw that movie where? You were in Siberia? A: When he called, I was practicing the violin. B: You were doing what? You don't play the violin – do you? etc. ______ And you're right about # 6 – it does not appear to be natural. However, it might be said. It's a stretch, though. I just invented this, and it sounds...Read More...

Adverb vs. adjective phrase

Hi, Azar's book and other book disagree in here: Sentence in question: Walking along the street , I met a friend of mine. One book [Thurman's Everything, the grammar ans style book] explains 'walking along the street'is an adjective phrase modifying I. This book says any participle phrase can only work as adjective, never adverbial. But Azar's book says it is an adverbial phrase. I can see the dependent clause is adverbial modifying the verb of main clause when it is rephrased as ' When I...Read More...
I am grateful to your insightful and thorough answer. Most students do not seem to mind this dilemma, but it bothers only the teacher who wants to prepare the lesson. Thank you, Rachel. DonRead More...

'not above bullying'

peteryoung
The phrase 'not above' seems to carry a meaning similar to that of 'almost'. For example: China is not above bullying those countries who criticise human rights in Tibet and elsewhere, threatening trade sanctions and chastising them for "interfering in domestic affairs". But my dictionary search turns up no definition for its meaning. Curiously, the phrase seems to occur most often in British English contexts. Would appreciate a reply. Thank you very much.Read More...
Yes, "not above" is close to meaning "almost," but it has a special meaning. One of the meanings of "above" is this, # 5 at the preposition "above" in the American Heritage Dictionary*" 5. Too honorable to bend to: I am above petty intrigue "Not above" is an ironic way of saying that the subject is not at all too honorable to bend to something. The writer of the sentence is giving a subjective point of view, against China, which he says is not at all too honorable to bend to bullying.Read More...

Relative pronoun ( Who )

Would you please help me with these questions . 1) Which of the following sentences is correct : a) The man who I wanted to talk to was not in his office . b) I wanted to talk to the man who was not in his offfice . *** If they are both correct with difference in meaning , please tell me too . ( What is this difference ? ) 2) I think the sentence before using ( Who ) was as follows : I wanted to talk to the man . He was not in his office . Am I right ? Thank you very much . SayedRead More...
Your sentences a) and b) are both correct. _______ 1. These sentences: I wanted to talk to the man. He was not in his office = I wanted to talk to the man who was not in his office. 2. These sentences: The man is not in his office. I wanted to talk to the man.= The man I wanted to talk to is not in his office. _______ The sentences have very similar meanings. RachelRead More...

getting a grip

Dear experts, Are the following expressions used only imperatively: GET A GRIP – be realistic; be serious: You expect to get A's without studying? Get a grip! GET A GRIP ON YOUR SELF – control yourself; do not be so emotional: When he cried, she said, ˜Get a grip on yourself, Dear.' Are they slang or colloquial? Thank you, YuriRead More...
"Get a grip" has this entry under "grip" in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English*:: "get a grip" spoken in order to tell someone to control their emotions: For God's sake get a grip! _______ Yes, "get a grip" is used most often in imperative sentences, but I found a few examples in the New York Times Archives in other modes. : "¢ Will Gary, the banker who's the oldest of the Lamberts' offspring, (a) make a killing in biotech stocks, (b) stand up to his crafty wife and mocking...Read More...

-to- as adj.

tommy
Yesterday's Community and Mobility conference must have been good because lines from presentations keep triggering fresh thoughts. John Urry's was particularly good, and I hope we'll get the slides or a link. Meanwhile time for reflection on one of the reasons for travelling that he mentioned... the need to work 'elbow-to-elbow' with someone on a project. To build trust you need to be face-to-face. To develop intimacy some cheek-to-check can help. Toe-to-toe and head-to-head suggests...Read More...
Some of the forms are adverbials, and others, although generally used as adjectivals or adverbials (this last without hyphens), are used here as nouns. One of the forms in the passage is used an adjectival: "human-machine." ADVERBIALS: elbow-to-elbow (manner adverbial modifying "work") face-to-face (position adverbial, complement of "be") NOMINALS: ... some cheek-to-cheek (grammatical subject of "can help") Toe-to Toe (grammatical subject of "suggest[s]") head-to-head (same as above)...Read More...

for your record(s)

Should the singular or plural form of 'record' be used in the following sentence? For your record/records, the arrangements for the meeting are as follow.Read More...
Given the nature of the message, which is about future plans, I would say that "for your record" is somewhat more appropriate. "For your record" can relate to something current or in the future, but "for your recordS" almost always relates to information that is intended to be archived, or kept as a record of something that is over, and is no longer current. Google examples: FOR YOUR RECORD "” For your record , here is a copy of the "laboratory declaration" you must sign. This is required in...Read More...

comparison

Which is correct: 1-This is good compared to what? 2-Compared to what is this good? 3-What is this good compared to? Which is acceptable in conversation and which in written English?Read More...
None of the three questions is very natural, and 2 as well as 3 are very unnatural. I can imagine 1 uttered in response to a statement such as "”This music is really good! One might answer "”It's good compared to what? I've found only one example of this construction on Google: "”OTM [sings] a siren song and claims to have good investment returns . (italics added) The questions you need to ask are " good compared to what and how much risk was assumed in doing so?" I wonder whether OTM can...Read More...

blue sky

Dear experts, Are you familiar with the idiomatic meanings of: BLUE SKY and THE SKY ISN'T BLUE? Thank you, YuriRead More...
I can't find any idiom with "blue sky," but I've found an adjective and a verb, both with a hyphen: "blue-sky." The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000 http://www.bartleby.com/61/90/B0349000.html . blue-sky [...] ADJECTIVE: 1. Unrealistic and impractical: "[The author] shows what is testable physics, what is philosophy's domain, and what is blue-sky nonsense" (Ann Finkbeiner, quoted in New York Times Book Review by Laurel Graebe r October 13, 1996). 2.Read More...

I like you the way you are.

I like you just the way you are. I have no trouble with the meaning of the sentence above, but how should I explain the sentence construction using the traditional grammar analysis? How does the "just the way you are" part fit in? I just tell the students "just the way you are" is an idiomatic expression? Or come to think of it, "I like the way you are" sounds fine to me. Then "the way you are" can be an object. Any help? AppleRead More...
"The way you are" means "in the state or condition in which you are." It may refer to someone's physical appearance, one's behavior, or one's personality. The Encarta World English Dictionary http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/Dicti...spx?refid=1861711399 ...has this as one definition of "way": 15. condition : the state or condition of somebody or something, especially with regard to health or finances He's in a bad way. If the students know the meaning of "as" they should...Read More...

make a life

Dear experts, How would you define the phrase MAKE A LIFE FOR ONESELF as in: I just think that no one understands what it is like to try to make a life for oneself in the world given our childhoods, like someone else who lived it. Thank you, YuriRead More...
"Make a life for oneself" means to construct a life for oneself, probably with effort. This sentence seems to imply that the people whom the writer is referring to had difficult childhoods, which they had to struggle to overcome. In making a life for themselves, the people had to work hard to do it, not just melt into adulthood without thinking about changes or the direction they wish to take. RachelRead More...

be well off

Dear experts, Would you say that BE WELL OFF and BE BETTER OFF do not correlate, or only partially correlate, in meaning: You would BE BETTER OFF to walk to the nearest house or farm and ask to use the phone, or ask them to call for help... Thank you, YuriRead More...
"Be well off" and "be better off" are used in the same kinds of context. Sometimes "be better off" carries a comparison that "be well off" does not. This comparison can be either explicit or implicit. Both expressions can be followed by an infinitive complement: WELL OFF "”Levay (and others) would be well off to think a bit more about "evolutionary theory" and its relation to culture. People (like other organisms) have all ... serendip.brynmawr.edu/sci_cult/ sexgender04/sexgender04 "”The one...Read More...

Want / Need / Would like / Would love

I usually use the following words interchangeably for many occasions: want need would like would love Yesterday, one of my friends asked me to explain the differences between each of them; I was clueless. Please advise me on how to properly use each of them. Thank you so much.Read More...
"Want" is a very direct way to state your desire for something, as in these first two definitions at the entry for "want" in the American Heritage Dictionary*: a. To desire greatly; wish for: They want to leave. She wants a glass of water . See synonyms at desire. b. To desire (someone to do something): I want you to clean your room . "Need" and "want" are often interchanged, and can be, but "need" refers more to a requirement or to correcting a lack of something, as in this definition*: To...Read More...

"Is such that"

peteryoung
Richard Kirkham suggests that our definition of knowledge needs to require that the believer's evidence is such that it logically necessitates the truth of the belief. If your system is such that it's still likely to occur, then perhaps you should make the counter 32 bits My question is: what different would there be if I delete the phrase in intalic? Does the sentence with the phrase convey more information than the sentence without the phrase? Thank you very much.Read More...
"Such that" does carry some meaning. The Free Online Dictionary, at http://www.thefreedictionary.com/such+that ...states: Adj. 1. such that - of a degree or quality specified (by the `that' clause); "their anxiety was such that they could not sleep" The first sentence is about the possible quality or degree of the believer's evidence. It could be paraphrased as "”Richard Kirkham suggests that our definition of knowledge needs to require that the believer's evidence is of a kind that it...Read More...

Choose the correct answer

Dear Marilyn How are you ?. Would you please help me with these questions : CHOOSE THE CORRECT ANSWER : 1) After a book is written , it goes to a .... a) reader b) seller c) publisher d) writer 2) He said , ' come in, ' and I ..... a) came b) went c) entered d) appeared Thank you very much . SayedRead More...
One of the major requirements of multiple-choice test design is that there be one and only one possible answer to questions (unless provision is made for more than one answer). A test item that allows more than one possible answer is not a valid measuring tool. As I said in my posting, if the first question had included "then""”an adverb of time which introduces the immediately following step"”the sentence would have allowed only c. That is, if the sentence had read "...it then goes...,"...Read More...

something else

Dear experts, How do we discriminate between SOMETHING ELSE and SOMETHING ELSE AGAIN - is the latter just an emphatic variant? Thank you, YuriRead More...
Yes, "something else again" could be described as an emphatic variant, as in these examples from the New York Times: "¢ Contract talks between musicians and management at major orchestras are usually contentious. But the bitterness that broke out at the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra this winter was something else again . A work stoppage from the players forced the cancellation of nearly two months of concerts. A contract was finally agreed to in late February, but the antagonism left raw...Read More...

If/whether differences

Dear Marilyn Would you please tell me with examples : What is difference between "if" and "whether"? When do we use each of them ? Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
"If" has two main uses: 1. It is used in conditional utterances: Sometimes shortages cause us to be unable to get 100% cotton shirts in our preferred weights for brief periods; if that occurs , we will not substitute with ... www.instantattitudes.com/shirtinfo.html "”PN50. MR TINDALE: That could be the case, Commissioner. We actually don't have any non-union members but if that occurred we would certainly agree to that. PN51 ... www.airc.gov.au/documents/ Transcripts/180804ag20045595.htm 2.Read More...

The Rolling Stones

Which is correct?: The Rolling Stones are on tour this year. OR The Rolling Stones is on tour this year.Read More...
Either version is OK in this case. The choice depends on whether you consider the group 1) as a unit or 2) as the actual performers working together. There are some differences in usage, and sometimes one verb form is preferred over the other. As is the case with many other plural names, "Rolling Stones" can be treated as a unit, meaning the group as a whole, or as the several musicians who make up the musical group. In general, if you're talking about something happening involving the...Read More...

with [a] child

Dear experts, Is the article semantically relevant in discriminating between the semi-idiomatic WITH CHILD – (liter.) going to have a baby; pregnant (also: big with child): I have also to inform you, that I am with child. and the free word combination WITH A CHILD, and if so, these phrases are never interchangeable? Thank you, YuriRead More...
"With child" is an idiom that means "pregnant." "With a child" means just that: accompanied by a child. The two expressions are not interchangeable. MarilynRead More...

Write/take an exam

Hello everyone. I have a question concerning the future progressive tense. Is it grammatically incorrect to say: " Are you WRITING the TOEIC test this Friday?" or should it be: " Are you TAKING the TOEIC test this Friday?" A colleague of mine, a Kiwi, says that we don't WRITE an exam, we TAKE it!! Now, I say both!! What I wanted to know is, grammatically, is saying WRITING incorrect? Thanks for your help. KNDURead More...
KNDU Junior Member Posted February 07, 2006 07:25 PM Hi Marilyn. Thank you very much for your reply and help. I really appreciate it. I knew that we also WRITE an exam/test!! KNDURead More...

Subject complements II

Which is correct: 1-This room is to sleep in. 2-This room is for sleeping in. 3-This knife is to cut meat. 4-This knife is to cut meat with. 5-This knife is for cutting meat.Read More...
Sentence 1 is correct. Sentence 2 doesn't need "in," because it's the activity represented by the gerund "sleeping" that's important. "In" isn't wrong, it's just redundant. You would say "”This room is for studying, not talking Sentence 3 is OK. Sentence 4, which is more explicit, is also OK. Sentence 5 is perfectly correct and natural. MarilynRead More...

Subject complements

Which are correct: 1-This is a good book for reading on a train. 2-This is a good book to read on a train. 3-This is a book good for reading on a train. 4-This is a book good to read on a train. 5-This book is for reading on a train. 6-This book is to read on a train. 7-This book is to be read on a train.Read More...
Sentences 1, 2,5, 6, and 7 are correct and natural. Sentences 3 and 4 are somewhat strange-sounding and not natural. They would be natural with a relative pronoun and BE, either "that is" or "which is". Sentence 7 has two possible meanings: "”This book is meant to be read on a train "”[Someone, possibly "you," the addressee] is to read this book on a train (a directive) MarilynRead More...

prepositions at end of sentence

I know that in some cases, a preposition can be put at the end of a sentence, e.g. This is a special screen that you can write on. But I'm not sure whether 'in' is needed in the following: London is a nice place to live (in?). People say 'live in London' but is 'in' needed in the sentence above? I think yes but some people say no. What's the answer?Read More...
With "place," it seems that "live" in the adjective clause can be followed by "in" or not. In these sentences, "live" and "live in" can be interchanged: These examples from the New York Times and Google: "¢ We'll go anywhere to really make the world a better place to live in "¢ ''It's a nice place to live in , and the historic background adds to the flavor,'' he said. "¢ When I'm done, whether it's two, four, six or eight years from now, the town will be a better place to live in . "¢ Dr.Read More...
×
×
×
×