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Similar expressions: "in sight of someone" and "in the sight of someone"?

Dear experts, Would you confirm that the expressions below share only two meanings in common or are they fully interchangeable: in sight of someone in the sight of someone in sight of someone - 1. near enough to see a person: We came in sight of some men, with hay-packs ready for the downward leap. 2. near enough to be seen by a person: The prosecution wanted the officers to testify behind a screen in sight of lawyers and defendants but hidden from the public. in the sight of someone - 1. =...Read More...

Can "for" be omitted?

Can "for" in the following sentences be omitted? 1. I have lived here (for) 40 years. 2. Have you lived here (for) 40 years? 3. I haven't seen her (for) 40 years. Any rules for the omission? appleRead More...

Partially synonymous expressions: "fur fly" and "feathers fly"?

Dear experts, Would you say that the expressions below are not FULLY interchangeable, sharing one meaning only: make the feathers fly - (coll.) 1. start working with the utmost vigor or energy: When Mrs. Hale did her spring cleaning she made the feathers fly. 2. quarrel violently; create a disturbance: Let's keep our sense of humor and try not to make the feathers fly in all this controversy. make the fur fly - (coll.) = make the feathers fly 2: When the boss finds out that they failed to...Read More...

Direct object/indirect object

Hello, Could you please tell me about the following sentences? 1)I'll make you some coffee. I'll make some coffee for you. 2)Cathy bought her boyfriend a book as/for a birthday present. Cathy bought a book for her boyfriend as/for a birthday present. 3)I gave my dad gloves for Christmas. I gave gloves to my dad for Christmas. Do they have the same meanings? And are they interchangeable? Thank you. poobearRead More...

But / However

Hello All, Could I get an explanation for the following two sentences please. 1)I learnt French easily, but I didn't like my teacher. 2) I learnt French easily. However, I didn't like my teacher. When does one use however and when but ? Both of them are used for contrast, which one is used when? Thanks in advance.Read More...

Branching off/out

Dear experts, Would you agree that the following phraseal verbs share only ONE meaning in which they are interchangeable: branch off branch out branch off - deviate from an original direction: At the bridge a little road branches off from the highway and follows the river. branch out - 1. (of a tree) spread out into branches: The tree branched out in every direction, casting a vast shadow over the house. 2. = branch off: After a pair of bends in descent the asphalt finishes and the road...Read More...

First conditional ?

Dear All, Please take a look at the following sentence. "The Bush administration has put foreign airlines on notice that they will be denied entry to US airspace if they refused to put armed air marshals on flights." To me, the if-clause is a first conditional one, and Michael Swan gives the following example : "If we PLAY tennis, I'll win" So, shouldn't it be "..they will be denied ... if they REFUSE ..." ? Thank you for your thoughts. Regards, RickyRead More...

"Figure out" and "work out"

Hello, I know the meaning of "figure out" and "work out". But I don't think I know their feelings. Could you tell me the feelings? 1)I have some problems but I'm ok, I'll work them out. 2)I don't understand what you mean. You'll figure it out someday. Are these correct? I always thank you so much for your hard work.Read More...

"Merge A with/and B"?

Which one of the following is correct? 1. King James tried unsuccessfullyto merge the legislature of Scotland with that of England. 2. King James tried unsuccessfully to merge the legislature of Scotland and that of England.Read More...

Synonymous expressions: "face up to" and "face down"?

Dear experts, Would you say that the expressions below are synonymous in meaning and interchangeable. If not, how would you define the difference in their meaning: face someone down face up to someone The project is too important to be placed in jeopardy by the sectarian vanity of one man, and those who are too cowardly to face him down. Jack was prepared to criticize his father when he wasn't present, but was afraid to face up to him when he was . Thank you, YuriRead More...

Corpus

Lately, the Collins Cobuild seems to be down. Is there any free online AmE corpus? If not, Could somebody tell about which commercial AmE corpus with reasonable price is good?Read More...

Placement of adverb

Please look at the following sentences. 1)I regularly have my hair colored every three months. 2)I have my hair colored every three months regularly. 3)Regularly,I have my hair colored every three months. When I emphasize "regularly" in writing, which sentence is correct? Thank you.Read More...

"Why it was he hadn't come"

Please look at the following sentence (1). (1) We never found out why it was he hadn't come. This sentence functions fine without IT WAS. When I'm asked to explain the sentence construction, what would be a succinct and clear way to tell the upper intermediate students what IT WAS is all about? Can the sentence (1) be divided into (2) and (3)? Does this help to explain this sentence construction in any way? (2) We never found out why. (3) It was why he hadn't come. appleRead More...

Closing the door

Dear experts, Would you say that the expressions below are NOT interchangeable in their respective contexts: close the door on someone close the door to someone They closed the door on their daughter when she married without their consent. If we ever closed the door to new Americans, our leadership in the world would soon be lost. Thank you, YuriRead More...

People who ITmight be appropriate for you...?

I wonder what the part of the speech of "it" in the sample sentence (1) and whether the sentence structure changes without "it". I vaguely remember this being discussed some time back in this Newsgroup. But I don't remember when and where. (1) You know, ma'am, we really don't have a lot of people who it might be appropriate for you to choose. Is the sentence correct without "it"? If not, can you tell me why? The sentence (1) can be separated as in (2)and (3) (2) We really don't have a lot of...Read More...

Money orders

Dear experts, Are the following terms used in the USA: POST-OFFICE ORDER, POSTAL MONEY ORDER, POSTAL ORDER and if so, could you comment on the difference in their meanings (if any). Thank you, YuriRead More...

On getting mad

Dear experts, Accept my profound thanks and the very best New Year wishes! Would you confirm my assumption that the expresssions MAD AT SOMETHING and MAD ON SOMETHING can each cover only ONE meaning of the phrase MAD ABOUT SOMETHING which however covers both their meanings: mad at something - (coll.) very angry about smth.: Didn't General Cass get mad at Hull's cowardice, and break his sword? mad on something - (coll.) very enthusiastic about smth.; excessively interested in smth.: I'm just...Read More...

Functions of "unawares"

In the following examples, what is the function of "unawares"? I'm fine with the meaning. "Professor, suppose I have a hot story and the guy I'm after won't talk to me on the phone. Do I climb into his window and try to catch him unawares?" ----The Essence of American Humor, Art Buchwald. Thank you. appleRead More...

Cleft? Adjective clause?

Is the following sentence correction OK? Childhood was considered an unimportant phase of which there was no need to keep any recordRead More...

"Traveler's check" "traveler's checks"?

Is "traveler's check" usually used as a singular or a plural? Which preposition sounds most natural? 1. Can I pay by/in/with/ traveler's check? 2. Can I pay by/in/with/ traveler's checks? appleRead More...

"Of" + determiners

1. other types of (the) measurement 2. many years of (the) experience 3. measurement of (the) satisfaction 4. measurement of the boy's satisfaction Why does 'the' not fit in 1 & 2?... at least I don't think they do. and how do they compare with 3 & 4. ThanksRead More...

What about it?

Dear experts, Would you concede that the expressions below are NOT interchangeable in any of their meanings: what about it what about that what about it - 1. is used as an expression of annoyance: Martha said: 'That boy is wearing a green coat.' Ian answered: 'What about it?' 2. is used as an inquiry as to the course of action: Your head keeper says we must have two guns apiece. Now - what about it? 3. (euph.) is used as an invitation to make love: The woman giggled... 'Come on, what about...Read More...

Literal vs. metaphorical: expressions with "wink"

Dear experts, Can both expressions give someone A wink give someone THE wink be used both literally and figuratively, for according to a dictionary: give someone a wink – wink at smb. in order to give a private signal of some kind: ˜I'll never believe there was anything between him and Mum...' ˜Don't make me laugh,' Vic said, giving Tom a wink. give someone the wink – (fig.) let a person know smth. quietly; give smb. a hint: I'll give you the wink when it's safe to come in. Thank you, YurRead More...

Inversion after "than"?

I know that in most cases, there is no inversion of subject and verb after "than." For example: Tom is taller than I (am). Jan reads faster than I (read). or Jan reads faster than I (do). However, there are some sentences in which we do need to invert the subject and verb after "than." For example: The infants of humans are more helpless than are those of most other animals. Are there rules about when we need to invert the subject and verb after "than"? In the above examples, are there...Read More...
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