All Forum Topics

Simple past with 'for the last 10 minutes'?

Last night I bumped into this sentence: Our bus didn't move for the last 10 minutes. Is it correct? I thought present perfect was used because of the phrase 'for the last 10 minutes' ur bus hasn't moved for the last 10 minutes.' Are both of them acceptable? Are there any differences in meaning? THANKSRead More...

The definite article with compound subject

Hello everybody, I've read that when ˜and' connects two nouns standing for things or people that are closely linked, a determiner is not normally repeated before the second noun. I don't know whether ˜boy' and ˜girl' are closely linked. Do I have to use ˜the' before ˜girl' in the sentence ˜The boy and THE girl are playing'? I think ˜king' and ˜queen' are closely linked. Can I say ˜The king and queen are dancing'? Thank you. Aneeth PrabhakarRead More...

Tense in reported question with "asked"

I have a question about reporting. Here it is: (this morning)I said to her,"Where did you go yesterday?" This afternoon, I'm reporting this. What can I say? a)I asked her where she had gone yesterday. b)I asked her where she went yesterday. c)I asked her where she had went the day before. thanksRead More...

Where to put an adverb

The following numbers are what I got from a simple Google search. My question is how do we determine where to put an adverb ( adjective?), whether before "be" or after "be". 1. It will hardly be possible 586 2. It will be hardly possible 215 3. It will almost be impossible. 171 4. It will be almost impossible 8460 AppleRead More...

"Every four years" vs. "every fourth year"

Hello, teachers! Here in Korea, we are taught that as an adverbial phrase, [every + cardinal number + plural noun] & [every + ordinal number + singular noun] have the same meaning. So it is taught that sentences 1 & 2 are both correct. However, I think sentence 2 is incorrect, isn't it? 1. The Olympics are held (once) every four years. 2. The Olympics are held (once) every fourth year. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

"Every two years", "every second year" vs. "every other year"

Hello, teachers! Here in Korea, we are taught that as an adverbial phrase, [every + two + plural noun], [every + second + singular noun], and [every + other + singular noun] all have the same meaning. So it is taught that sentences 1, 2, and 3 are all correct. However, I think sentence 2 is incorrect, but sentence 3 is correct even though it sounds somewhat unnatural. Am I right? 1. The festival takes place every two years. 2. The festival takes place every second year. 3. The festival takes...Read More...

in/per two years

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these are correct or not? I think these are correct even though it is uncommon. Am I right? 1. The Olympics take place once in/per four years. 2. The festival is held once in/per two years. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

present perfect

Present perfect tense often confuses me. Can you check out this sentence? Amy has been kind to everybody. Does it always mean she is still kind to everybody? Or it depends on the situation? THANKSRead More...

'Family' and article

Hello, teachers! [1] Would you please tell me if we should use 'a' or not? 1. You are my brother. We're [a] family. / We were never [a] family. 2. We are [a] team. [2] Would you please tell me if we can leave 'our' out? 3. We just had [our] family at the wedding. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Prepositions with 'alert'

There is a sentence that confuses me: He alerted board members of the possibility of a union strike. As I know, the word alert is used with 'to' not 'of'. So I think the sentence should be 'he alerted board members to the possibility of a union strike'. Am I right? THANKSRead More...

alert ~ of?

Can you check out the sentence below? He alerted board members of the possibility of a union strike. Is it correct? You usually use 'alert' with 'to'. THANKS!Read More...

Infinitive or gerund or base form?

I have a follow-up question to something that I saw in the archives. The question from the archives (see below) is regarding the use of infinitive/ gerund/ base form after phrases like "What should be done is." The response indicates that the infinitive or base form can be used but that the gerund cannot be used. What about in a sentence starting with "What is important is"? Can't we say, "What is important is doing your homework."? We could also say "What is important is to do your...Read More...

conditionals

Dear all, Please take a look at the following : Scenario : I'm about to take a holiday in an area renowned for its very wet weather and I tell my friend, A, about it. A: So, you won't be surprised if it rains ? Me : No, I'm expecting it to.Indeed,if it didn't rain, I would be very surprised. Are the if-clause conditionals correct in the above dialogue ? Thank you. RickyRead More...

"Find + object + (to be) + noun phrase"

Hello, teachers! Would you please check my thoughts about the usage of the verb 'find'? 1. They will find you a policeman if you act like that. 2. They will find you [to be] a policeman if you act like that. 1a. They will call a policeman for you. 2a. They will discover that you are a policeman. I think #1 can mean either #1a or #2a, and #2 means only #2a.. Therefore, I think we usually use #1 to express #1a, and #2 for #2a; that is, we don't omit [to be] in #2. 3. I will find you [to be]...Read More...

The Beatles were/was

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. - The Beatles [were] one of the most famous popular groups in history. Why should we use only 'were', not 'was'? I think both are Ok, and moreover 'was' is more logical. However, a book and a native speaker, an American on some edu-TV, say only 'were' is correct. Is that because 'the Beatles' was/were a English group? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

"For him to verb" as a subject

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. 1. For him to apologize/go there/win will be good. 2. It will be good for him to apologize/go there/win. Is there any difference in nuance? .....Such as 'good for him' or 'good for us' Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Possessed by/ of/ with?

Dear experts, Accept my gratitude for your very thorough and conscientious treatment of my queries. Will you now validate the way I see the difference between: possessed by something possessed of something possessed with something possessed by something – having one's mind dominated by some strong emotion: We drop anchor beneath the island's precipitous cliffs and, possessed by a powerful craving for a cold beer, row to the fish-stained docks. possessed of something – 1. being the owner of...Read More...

'Join' and 'join in'

This question had been posted by Yuri, but was deleted by technical error. Dear experts, Will you agree that the expressions below share only one meaning in common: join in something join something join in something – associate with smb. in some activity: She saw him in a highly flirtatious conversation with an attractive woman so she ambled over naturally and just joined in the conversation. join something – 1. become a member of a club, society, organization, etc.: Many well-known figures...Read More...

forward one's email to

I know we can say "I'll forward Tom's email to you". But can we also say " I'll forward you Tom's email"? I think not, but not sure. AppleRead More...

"Talk about...!" "Talk of" too?

Dear experts, As you know, the expression TALK ABOUT may be used in the idiomatic sense to emphasize the significance of the thing mentioned: Did you see the film last night? Talk about laugh! I've never laughed so much in my life. May it not have a variant form TALK OF used in the same meaning? Thank you, YuriRead More...

The earth is/was round

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. I think 'is' is the only correct choice, but 'was' is also said commonly. Am I right? 1. He made a voyage to prove that the earth is/was round. 2. They didn't accept that the earth is/was round. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Overwhelmed by/with something

Dear experts, Will you confirm that the expressions below share only one meaning in common: overwhelmed by something overwhelmed with something overwhelmed by something – made to feel absolutely helples or embarrassed because of smth.: Many students were, indeed, overwhelmed by the events and sought consolation from fellow students and Student Services staff. On the one hand, we want them to know what happened and how awful it was; on the other hand, we don't want them to be overwhelmed by...Read More...

'Give it up' vs. 'give up'

Hello, teachers! Is there any difference in meaning when 'it' is used and omitted? 1. We might as well give [it] up. 2. Does this mean I've got to give [it] up? / I'm afraid so. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

'Attribute' & similar verbs

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if all these verbs are acceptable? 1. She [attributes, ascribes, imputes, owes, refers] her bad temper to ill health. 2. She [attributes, ascribes, imputes, owes, refers] her success to hard work. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...
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