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Will you/won't you/would you have some more...

Dear teacher I'd like you to help me choose the words again. Here is another conversation: A: ( )( ) have some more wine? B: No, thank you. It's late, so I must be going now. Can I use #1~#3? #1 Will you #2 Won't you #3 Would you I wonder whether you use #3 or not. Is there any other expression which is appropriate? Thank you. LinaRead More...

To keep [on] -ing

Hello, teachers! - The soldiers kept [on] firing until they had no more ammunition. Is there any difference in meaning between with and w/o 'on'? Some say the difference is in intermittence, but I think they can use interchangeably without any change of meaning. Am I right? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

verb tense in 'now that' clause

Hi!! I am trying to find if the 'now that' clause may have present/past perfective tenses. The Cobuild dictionary lists two example sentences which contain present and past tenses, but not perfective ones. I heard that perfective tenses cannot be used in the 'now that' clause. I want to confirm if it is true, and if so, why. Please kindly help.Read More...

'Shall we,' 'would you,' 'will you'

Hello Would you help me with the following grammar question? Here is the conversation and I have to find the appropriate word to fill in the blank. A: ( )( ) go fishing at Haruna tomorrow? B: Oh, that sounds good. I like fishing. How about the following group of words? #1 Shall we #2 Will you #3 Won't you Among #1,#2 and #3 if there is the one with which the conversation sounds unnatural, would you tell me it? Is there the answer which is more appropriate? Thank you. LinaRead More...

'Field' and 'fields'

Hi!! again. As far as I know, the word 'field' is an uncountable noun. But sometimes I have found the plural form of 'fields' is sometimes used. Could you kindly explain when 'field' can be plural? I don't have sentence at the moment, but if you need, I will try to find. If this is a simple question which you may respond without much consideration, please kindly let me know. Always thanking you,Read More...

Tired of / from / with

Dear experts, Would you confirm the difference in meaning of TIRED OF / FROM / WITH as represented below: tired from something tired of something tired with something tired from something – physically tired; exhausted by smth.: Walter now plonked himself, tired from his walk, on the sofa. tired of something – 1. bored or mentally exhausted with smth.: This law limited any raising of property taxes, the people being tired of constant increases. 2. = tired from something: The salesladies,...Read More...

'Make an exception for/ of'

Dear experts, Will you confirm that there is no difference in meaning between: make an exception for = make an exception of Thank you, YuriRead More...

More on 'neglect'

This posting refers to a previous question on the use of the noun "neglect," posted by Yuri, last addressed on July 5 on this newsgroup. Dear experts, Many thanks. Does it follow that NEGLECT IN DUTIES and NEGLECT OF DUTIES mean somewhat different things as in: Any neglect in duties, inappropriate behavior or lack of good judgment will be addressed with a verbal warning. This desertion of the Board's responsibilities is legally and morally the very ˜neglect of duties' that would justify...Read More...

'Does not already own'

Hi - came across the following sentence and thought it odd: XX is trying to wrest control of the remaining 70% stake in the airline it does not already own , with an offer of A$O.20 per share. 'it does not already own' - I find the use of already odd with the negative meaning of this sentence. Compare the following: (a) I do not already own 70% of the company. (b) I do not own 70% of the company.Read More...

He said that....

Hi! How are you? I've got a problem. Can you help me? a. He said that he gets up at six every morning. b. He said that he got up at six every morning. Are both of them correct? And, are there any differences in meaning? THANKSRead More...

very delighted

A grammar book for students says that for ajectives that are very strong (e.g. 'delighted'), we should use 'absolutely' and not 'very'. Thus, 'I'm very delighted to...' is wrong. It should be 'I'm absolutely delighted...'. However, there are examples of 'very delighted' in the google engine. Is it wrong to say 'very delighted'? HelenRead More...

Imperative mood in the declarative form?

Hello, teachers! Help me with this, please! 1. You are not going anywhere until Dr. Kimberly signs your release! 2. You harm one hair on my family's head , [comma not period] I will kill you. 1a. You can't go anywhere until Dr. Kimberly signs your release! 2a. If you harm one hair of my family's heads , I will kill you. Sentences #1 and #2 are from movies. I think these should be 1a & 2a, but I seem to have met these kinds of sentences often. Are these also correct and natural? Do I have...Read More...

'Neglect of' and 'neglect in'

Dear experts, Could you comment on the difference (if it is worth it) between NEGLECT IN SOMETHING and NEGLECT OF SOMETHING as in: neglect of one's duty, neglect of one's friends... neglect in one's clothes... Thank you, YuriRead More...

'In accord/ accordance with something'

Dear experts, would you concede that there is a slight difference between: in accord with something in accordance with something in accord with something – in agreement or harmony with smth.: Minor changes may be approved by divisional councils as long as they are in accord with University policy. in accordance with something – obeying or following smth.: The Basic Law was drafted in accordance with the Sino-British Joint Declaration on the Question of Hong Kong. The following regulations...Read More...

Omission of "if" in a conditional sentence

This posting is part of a longer question sent in by Hogel . Which of the following is correct? 2. You harm one hair on my family's head, [comma not period] I will kill you. 2a. If you harm one hair of my family's heads, I will kill you. 2b. He harm [not harms] one hair of my family's heads, I will kill him.Read More...

"Sometime' and 'some time'

Dear experts, Would you say that the items below share one meaning in common in which they are interchangeable: some time sometime some time – 1. at some indefinite time: Rehearsals have already started and the record is expected to be released some time in the autumn. 2. for a period of time: There is a class of women who take lodgings, and after staying some time run away without paying their rent. sometime – = some time 1: I almost forgot to say that the museum is slated for an opening...Read More...

The meaning of 'will' in 'I'll bet'

Hello, teachers! - What do you think Tom is doing right now? / I'll bet he's sleeping. This sentence is from a movie. I think normally we use 'I bet,' but 'I'll bet' is also correct and natural. In this case, 'will' expresses speaker's strong willingness, I think. Am I right? If so, would you explain why we say 'I'll - contraction form', not 'I will (or shall)'? Thank you very much. Enjoy the damp world! Best Regards.Read More...

Running with the ball

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that the idioms RUN WITH THE BALL is not identical in meaning to another idiomatic expression RUN WITH ONE'S OWN BALL? Thank you, YuriRead More...

check if....

Hi! Good afternoon! I've got a question. Would you please answer it? Check that the landing area is safe. Can I use 'if' instead of 'that' in the sentence? THANKS A LOT!Read More...

Still playing ball

Dear experts, According to: http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0332193.html PLAY BALL can be used to mean 'start or continue any action'. Is that supposed to be a general meaning or the one only realized in the phrase LET'S PLAY BALL as in: You all ready to get going on this project? OK, let's play ball. Thank you, YuriRead More...

The Olympic Games were or was ?

Hi! How are you? Can you look at this sentice? The Olymipic Games (were, was ) held in Seoul in 1988. Which is correct or better if it is? thanks!Read More...

I bet she was. I bet it was she.

That was the woman you were talking about. 1. I bet she was. 2. I bet it was she. 3. I bet she was the one. 4. I bet it was her. Of the four sentences above, which one(s) is (are)correct? Grammatically, 2 and 4 may not be correct, although they can be understood. What about when the be-verbs are present, as in "I bet she is"?. Is the present be verb technically acceptable here? Apple.Read More...

Play ball/play THE ball

Dear experts, Many thanks for the detailed and most competent comment on the previous. Would you agree that the idiomatic expression PLAY BALL is not interchangeable with the phrase PLAY THE BALL in the contexts below (i.e. the article is semantically relevant in discriminating the two): PLAY BALL – 1. cooperate with a person: I might have played ball just a little, but I scorned to. 2. act justly and honestly: I appreciate the way you've played ball with me, and in return you can be sure...Read More...
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