All Forum Topics

The Beatles were/was

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. - The Beatles [were] one of the most famous popular groups in history. Why should we use only 'were', not 'was'? I think both are Ok, and moreover 'was' is more logical. However, a book and a native speaker, an American on some edu-TV, say only 'were' is correct. Is that because 'the Beatles' was/were a English group? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

"For him to verb" as a subject

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. 1. For him to apologize/go there/win will be good. 2. It will be good for him to apologize/go there/win. Is there any difference in nuance? .....Such as 'good for him' or 'good for us' Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Possessed by/ of/ with?

Dear experts, Accept my gratitude for your very thorough and conscientious treatment of my queries. Will you now validate the way I see the difference between: possessed by something possessed of something possessed with something possessed by something – having one's mind dominated by some strong emotion: We drop anchor beneath the island's precipitous cliffs and, possessed by a powerful craving for a cold beer, row to the fish-stained docks. possessed of something – 1. being the owner of...Read More...

'Join' and 'join in'

This question had been posted by Yuri, but was deleted by technical error. Dear experts, Will you agree that the expressions below share only one meaning in common: join in something join something join in something – associate with smb. in some activity: She saw him in a highly flirtatious conversation with an attractive woman so she ambled over naturally and just joined in the conversation. join something – 1. become a member of a club, society, organization, etc.: Many well-known figures...Read More...

forward one's email to

I know we can say "I'll forward Tom's email to you". But can we also say " I'll forward you Tom's email"? I think not, but not sure. AppleRead More...

"Talk about...!" "Talk of" too?

Dear experts, As you know, the expression TALK ABOUT may be used in the idiomatic sense to emphasize the significance of the thing mentioned: Did you see the film last night? Talk about laugh! I've never laughed so much in my life. May it not have a variant form TALK OF used in the same meaning? Thank you, YuriRead More...

The earth is/was round

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. I think 'is' is the only correct choice, but 'was' is also said commonly. Am I right? 1. He made a voyage to prove that the earth is/was round. 2. They didn't accept that the earth is/was round. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Overwhelmed by/with something

Dear experts, Will you confirm that the expressions below share only one meaning in common: overwhelmed by something overwhelmed with something overwhelmed by something – made to feel absolutely helples or embarrassed because of smth.: Many students were, indeed, overwhelmed by the events and sought consolation from fellow students and Student Services staff. On the one hand, we want them to know what happened and how awful it was; on the other hand, we don't want them to be overwhelmed by...Read More...

'Give it up' vs. 'give up'

Hello, teachers! Is there any difference in meaning when 'it' is used and omitted? 1. We might as well give [it] up. 2. Does this mean I've got to give [it] up? / I'm afraid so. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

'Attribute' & similar verbs

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if all these verbs are acceptable? 1. She [attributes, ascribes, imputes, owes, refers] her bad temper to ill health. 2. She [attributes, ascribes, imputes, owes, refers] her success to hard work. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Will you/won't you/would you have some more...

Dear teacher I'd like you to help me choose the words again. Here is another conversation: A: ( )( ) have some more wine? B: No, thank you. It's late, so I must be going now. Can I use #1~#3? #1 Will you #2 Won't you #3 Would you I wonder whether you use #3 or not. Is there any other expression which is appropriate? Thank you. LinaRead More...

To keep [on] -ing

Hello, teachers! - The soldiers kept [on] firing until they had no more ammunition. Is there any difference in meaning between with and w/o 'on'? Some say the difference is in intermittence, but I think they can use interchangeably without any change of meaning. Am I right? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

verb tense in 'now that' clause

Hi!! I am trying to find if the 'now that' clause may have present/past perfective tenses. The Cobuild dictionary lists two example sentences which contain present and past tenses, but not perfective ones. I heard that perfective tenses cannot be used in the 'now that' clause. I want to confirm if it is true, and if so, why. Please kindly help.Read More...

'Shall we,' 'would you,' 'will you'

Hello Would you help me with the following grammar question? Here is the conversation and I have to find the appropriate word to fill in the blank. A: ( )( ) go fishing at Haruna tomorrow? B: Oh, that sounds good. I like fishing. How about the following group of words? #1 Shall we #2 Will you #3 Won't you Among #1,#2 and #3 if there is the one with which the conversation sounds unnatural, would you tell me it? Is there the answer which is more appropriate? Thank you. LinaRead More...

'Field' and 'fields'

Hi!! again. As far as I know, the word 'field' is an uncountable noun. But sometimes I have found the plural form of 'fields' is sometimes used. Could you kindly explain when 'field' can be plural? I don't have sentence at the moment, but if you need, I will try to find. If this is a simple question which you may respond without much consideration, please kindly let me know. Always thanking you,Read More...

Tired of / from / with

Dear experts, Would you confirm the difference in meaning of TIRED OF / FROM / WITH as represented below: tired from something tired of something tired with something tired from something – physically tired; exhausted by smth.: Walter now plonked himself, tired from his walk, on the sofa. tired of something – 1. bored or mentally exhausted with smth.: This law limited any raising of property taxes, the people being tired of constant increases. 2. = tired from something: The salesladies,...Read More...

'Make an exception for/ of'

Dear experts, Will you confirm that there is no difference in meaning between: make an exception for = make an exception of Thank you, YuriRead More...

More on 'neglect'

This posting refers to a previous question on the use of the noun "neglect," posted by Yuri, last addressed on July 5 on this newsgroup. Dear experts, Many thanks. Does it follow that NEGLECT IN DUTIES and NEGLECT OF DUTIES mean somewhat different things as in: Any neglect in duties, inappropriate behavior or lack of good judgment will be addressed with a verbal warning. This desertion of the Board's responsibilities is legally and morally the very ˜neglect of duties' that would justify...Read More...

'Does not already own'

Hi - came across the following sentence and thought it odd: XX is trying to wrest control of the remaining 70% stake in the airline it does not already own , with an offer of A$O.20 per share. 'it does not already own' - I find the use of already odd with the negative meaning of this sentence. Compare the following: (a) I do not already own 70% of the company. (b) I do not own 70% of the company.Read More...

He said that....

Hi! How are you? I've got a problem. Can you help me? a. He said that he gets up at six every morning. b. He said that he got up at six every morning. Are both of them correct? And, are there any differences in meaning? THANKSRead More...

very delighted

A grammar book for students says that for ajectives that are very strong (e.g. 'delighted'), we should use 'absolutely' and not 'very'. Thus, 'I'm very delighted to...' is wrong. It should be 'I'm absolutely delighted...'. However, there are examples of 'very delighted' in the google engine. Is it wrong to say 'very delighted'? HelenRead More...

Imperative mood in the declarative form?

Hello, teachers! Help me with this, please! 1. You are not going anywhere until Dr. Kimberly signs your release! 2. You harm one hair on my family's head , [comma not period] I will kill you. 1a. You can't go anywhere until Dr. Kimberly signs your release! 2a. If you harm one hair of my family's heads , I will kill you. Sentences #1 and #2 are from movies. I think these should be 1a & 2a, but I seem to have met these kinds of sentences often. Are these also correct and natural? Do I have...Read More...

'Neglect of' and 'neglect in'

Dear experts, Could you comment on the difference (if it is worth it) between NEGLECT IN SOMETHING and NEGLECT OF SOMETHING as in: neglect of one's duty, neglect of one's friends... neglect in one's clothes... Thank you, YuriRead More...

'In accord/ accordance with something'

Dear experts, would you concede that there is a slight difference between: in accord with something in accordance with something in accord with something – in agreement or harmony with smth.: Minor changes may be approved by divisional councils as long as they are in accord with University policy. in accordance with something – obeying or following smth.: The Basic Law was drafted in accordance with the Sino-British Joint Declaration on the Question of Hong Kong. The following regulations...Read More...
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