All Forum Topics

Omission of "if" in a conditional sentence

This posting is part of a longer question sent in by Hogel . Which of the following is correct? 2. You harm one hair on my family's head, [comma not period] I will kill you. 2a. If you harm one hair of my family's heads, I will kill you. 2b. He harm [not harms] one hair of my family's heads, I will kill him.Read More...

"Sometime' and 'some time'

Dear experts, Would you say that the items below share one meaning in common in which they are interchangeable: some time sometime some time – 1. at some indefinite time: Rehearsals have already started and the record is expected to be released some time in the autumn. 2. for a period of time: There is a class of women who take lodgings, and after staying some time run away without paying their rent. sometime – = some time 1: I almost forgot to say that the museum is slated for an opening...Read More...

The meaning of 'will' in 'I'll bet'

Hello, teachers! - What do you think Tom is doing right now? / I'll bet he's sleeping. This sentence is from a movie. I think normally we use 'I bet,' but 'I'll bet' is also correct and natural. In this case, 'will' expresses speaker's strong willingness, I think. Am I right? If so, would you explain why we say 'I'll - contraction form', not 'I will (or shall)'? Thank you very much. Enjoy the damp world! Best Regards.Read More...

Running with the ball

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that the idioms RUN WITH THE BALL is not identical in meaning to another idiomatic expression RUN WITH ONE'S OWN BALL? Thank you, YuriRead More...

check if....

Hi! Good afternoon! I've got a question. Would you please answer it? Check that the landing area is safe. Can I use 'if' instead of 'that' in the sentence? THANKS A LOT!Read More...

Still playing ball

Dear experts, According to: http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0332193.html PLAY BALL can be used to mean 'start or continue any action'. Is that supposed to be a general meaning or the one only realized in the phrase LET'S PLAY BALL as in: You all ready to get going on this project? OK, let's play ball. Thank you, YuriRead More...

The Olympic Games were or was ?

Hi! How are you? Can you look at this sentice? The Olymipic Games (were, was ) held in Seoul in 1988. Which is correct or better if it is? thanks!Read More...

I bet she was. I bet it was she.

That was the woman you were talking about. 1. I bet she was. 2. I bet it was she. 3. I bet she was the one. 4. I bet it was her. Of the four sentences above, which one(s) is (are)correct? Grammatically, 2 and 4 may not be correct, although they can be understood. What about when the be-verbs are present, as in "I bet she is"?. Is the present be verb technically acceptable here? Apple.Read More...

Play ball/play THE ball

Dear experts, Many thanks for the detailed and most competent comment on the previous. Would you agree that the idiomatic expression PLAY BALL is not interchangeable with the phrase PLAY THE BALL in the contexts below (i.e. the article is semantically relevant in discriminating the two): PLAY BALL – 1. cooperate with a person: I might have played ball just a little, but I scorned to. 2. act justly and honestly: I appreciate the way you've played ball with me, and in return you can be sure...Read More...

"Maybe" and "may be"

Dear experts, How do you usually comment on the difference between MAYBE and MAY BE. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Conditional IF and to-infinitive

Hello, teachers! I think we can say 1-2. instead of 1-1, but we can't say 2-2 instead of 2-1. I think this question is absurd, but I'd like to ask you to explain Why if it is possible. Help me with this, please. 1-1. Would you like me to verify that for you? / Would you? It'd be very kind of you [to do that]. 1-2. Would you like me to verify that for you? / Would you? It'd be very kind of you [if you did that]. 2-1. Do you want me to verify that for you? / Will you? It's very kind of you [to...Read More...

would you please

Could oyu check out one more ? A: How do you like my new bicycle? B: I like it , but would you please (not park, not to park)it on my own lawn. Which is correct? I think the former is. Am I right? thanks!Read More...

any other boys?

Would you check out the sentence below? He is taller than any other boys in his class. Is it correct or not? Do you always have to use 'singular' after 'any other' such as 'any other boy'. thanks!Read More...

Follow-up: "nothing to say"

Dear experts, How would you define HAVE NOTHING TO SAY in the following context: When he was asked about the noise he made and about throwing things out of his cell he stated that he had nothing to say. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Definite articles and the unique title

Hello, teachers! Please help me with this. I know we usually omit 'the' in #1 if the post is unique. I wonder if it is true in case the adjective 'new' modifies it like #2. I tink I've heard we don't omit 'the' in this case. My memory serves me right? 1. He is [the] senior vice president at Heaven Foods. 2. He is [the] new senior vice president at Heaven Foods. Thank you very much. Enjoy the cloudy, dark sky. Best Regards.Read More...

'Have nothing to say' (+ and - 'for oneself')

Dear experts, Thanks for the previous. Now, do the following relate as partially synonymous expressions that have only one meaning in common: have nothing to say have nothing to say for oneself have nothing to say – be unable to justify or explain one's opinions or conduct; say nothing in one's own defense. have nothing to say for oneself – 1. be unwilling to express one's opinions; be habitually silent. 2. = have nothing to say. Best regards, YuriRead More...

'Keep off"--partial synonyms?

Dear experts, Would you say that the following phrasal verbs are not equivalent and share only one meaning in which they are interchangeable: keep off something keep something off keep off something – 1. remain at a distance from smth.: In an election which seems to have been fair, both the Basque extremist organisation ETA and the Spanish national police kept off the streets. 2. prevent smth. from coming near or happening: The ships were wintered by dismantling the riggings and covering the...Read More...

A novelist and (a) song writer

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these are all correct and natural? 1. Luke Hart, a novelist and also a song writer, is popular with teenagers. 2. Luke Hart, a novelist and a song writer, is popular with teenagers. 3. Luke Hart, a novelist and song writer, is popular with teenagers. Thank you very much. Enjoy the all-day rain. Best Regards.Read More...

could/would + past tense

Dear All, Please take a look at the following : 1)." I couldn't say that my son attended church now." - a lady said this to me about a present situation concerning her son. Q : Why the past tense 'attended' ? 2) " I thought it would be good to sort things out before we all go away on holidays." Q : With 'thought' and 'would' in the past tense, shouldn't 'go' be in the past tense too ie 'went'? Other than in a conditional context,what is the rule for using past tense with would/could...Read More...

Perfect Infinitive & Continuous Infinitive

Hello Teachers, Here are 2 sentences, in the Perfect Infinitive and Present Contnuous infinitive. I would like to know when and how are they used. 1) I would like to have met Napoleon. 2) I would like to be lying on the beach right now. ThanxsRead More...

Have a lot to say

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that the expressions below are not strictly speaking synonymous: have a lot to say for oneself have nothing to say for oneself Is the following sentence grammatically correct (considering inversion at the end): As for that bland man... he really annoys me, he's so dull and has nothing to say for himself, not bad looking though is he! Thank you, YuriRead More...

"While + participle"

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these are all acceptable? I think 1 to 3 are correct, but 4 is ungrammatical or at least uncommon. Am I right? 1. While going to school, I stopped by the stationery store. 2. Going to school, I stopped by the stationery store. 3. I stopped by the stationery store while going to school. 4. I stopped by the stationery store going to school. Thank you very much. Enjoy the start of the rainy season. All the best.Read More...

As such ...at the beginning of the sentence

I have seen quite a few sentences using the phrase as such . Perhaps I misunderstand something here but I believe such in as such is in fact a pronoun and, as a result, it should have an antecedent.The sentence with As such in the beginning of the sentence can be quite confusing. Let's look at one example below: "As opposed to international practices, as well as practices followed in the Asian region, Pakistan delayed the re-basing of the national accounts for two decades. As such , many...Read More...

'Hawaii beach' or 'Hawaiian beach'

Hello, teachers! Which is the correct expression, 'Hawaii beach' or 'Hawaiian beach'? A Google search showed me the same number. If both are correct, is there any difference in meaning or nuance? Ex; I will be swimming on the Hawaii/Hawaiian beach by this time the day after tomorrow. Thank you very much. Have a nice weekend. Best Regards.Read More...
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