All Forum Topics

Does this need a yes or no answer or a right or wrong one?

Hello, teachers! A; Is this the book you are looking for? B; [______] Where did you find this anyway? Would you please tell me which is the correct reply in the place of [____], 1, 2, or both? 1. That's right. 2. Yes, it is. Thank you very much. Enjoy twinkling stars in the dark sky.Read More...

Sick to/in one's stomach

Hello, teachers! I would like to ask you about the expression "sick to/in one's stomach". [1] Does this sentence mean A, B, or both? - I feel sick to/in my stomach. A. I have a stomach ache. B. I feel nausea. [2] Do we use these expressions too? - I feel sick to/in my heart/head/back/leg. [3] Could you please check and correct my sentences? 1. I feel sick (in/to my stomach). / Take/Try this medicine. 2. Bad/Rotten/Spoiled/Stale food makes you sick (in/to your stomach). 3. I felt sick (in/to...Read More...

"How come ...?" vs. "Why don't ....?"

Hello, teachers! Could you please tell me the difference in meaning when we use 'how come ...' and 'why don't .....'? Do they have exactly the same meaning? 1. How come you don't eat/finish those left-over potato chips? / Sorry, I'm already full. I can't have any more. 2. Why don't you eat/finish ... Thank you very much. Enjoy twinkling stars in the dark sky.Read More...

"All the people," "all OF the people"

What is the difference between (1) and (2)? (1) all the people. (2) all of the people. ˜Of' in (2) seems redundant. If not, what function does this ˜of' have? If there is a situation where these two (1) and (2) are not interchangeable, what situation would that be? appleRead More...

tense

Hello teachers! Would you please point out the correct choice? 1-1. Jane said to Jim, "I didn't tell your mother anything about what you [did, had done] to Peter." 1-2. Jane told Jim that she hadn't told his mother anything about what he [did, had done] to Peter. 2-1. His secretary said to him, "there were no phone calls while you were out." 2-2. His secretary told him that there had been no phone calls while he [was, had been] out. Thank you very much. Best regards.Read More...

At a fast food shop

Hello, teachers! Would you please help me with this? Which is/are the correct and common choice/choices in the place of [____]? [1] I'd like 4 cheeseburgers, 3 Cokes, and 1 milk shake. / That [____] 15 dollars and 45 cents. 1. is, 2. will be 3. would be 4. is going to be 5. [comes to, will come to, would come to, is coming to] 6. [runs to, will run to, would run to, is going to run to] [2] I'd like two milk shakes and three Cokes. / [____] / Yes, that's all. 1. Is that all? 2. Will that be...Read More...

"haven't eaten","haven't been eating"

There is a use of present perfect progressive based on present evidence of recent past activity. The focus is more on the effects of the activity than on the activity itself. The following two sentences (1)(2) are both grammatically acceptable, but which one is likely to follow (3)? What is the difference in the nuance? Are there any other examples that clarify this point better? (1) You haven't eaten for days, have you? (2) You haven't been eating for days, have you? (3) You look starved. appleRead More...

Many in positive sentences?

Hi, Is "many" used in affirmative sentences? Is the following sentence wrong? 1)There are many cars on the road. 2) The library has many English books. I am told that manyis used mainly in negative sentences and questions. But the above two sentences sound correct to me.. Help will be appreciated.. ThanxsRead More...

"Would better" or "had better?

Hello. Would anybody please tell me the difference between "had better" and "would better"? I've heard that "~'d better" means "would better",not "had better",but I believe that "I'd better go/going" means "had better". I feel like "had better" sounds strong,a kind of demand, and "would better" sounds like suggestion. Which one is better to use when I advise:"This one is better to do/take" and "this way is better to do/take"? Thank you. poobearRead More...

A saying

What does the sentence mean? Into each life, a little rain must fall?Read More...

"A few" vs. "few"

What are the differences in meaning? a few days ago few days ago not many days ago not very many days ago thanksRead More...

"A majority of"

Are all of these grammatically acceptable? a majority of people a majority of the people a majority of money a majority of the money thanksRead More...

Articles

What are the differences in meaning? to take a bus to take the bus to take a taxi to take the taxi to go to a park to go to the park thanksRead More...

"Only if" vs. "if only"

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these sentences are all used basically with the same meaning? If so, which is common? 1. My God! Only if your mother saw you, she would be heartbroken. 2. My God! If only your mother only saw you, she would be heartbroken. 3. My God! If your mother only saw you, she would be heartbroken. Thank you very much. Best regards.Read More...

"Since" with Present Perfect

Hello I thought that the simple past is used after "since." Then, I ran into the following sentences where the present perfect is used after "since." 1) It's been a long time since I've swung a golf club. 2) It's been a long time since I've been to Augusta. Are they correct English? If so, how are they different from the following sentences? 3) It's been a long time since I swang a golf club. 4) It's been a long time since I went to Augusta. I'm really confused. Please help! DJRead More...

Connotation of "had better"

I hear that "You had better--" sometimes connotes a warning or (in some cases) a threat, therefore Non-native speakers should be careful about using this phrase to avoid any misundersdanding. On the other hand, this phrase can very often be heard in everyday life like the examples below. 1.You look pale. You had better go see a doctor. 2.You'd better come back soon. The party has already begun. 3.Hey. you'd better watch this TV show. It's so hilarious. So, could you tell me in what cases...Read More...

"Revenge"

Hello, teachers! Would you please help me with this? Do I express my thoughts properly? If not, could you show me the correct expressions? [1] I'd like mean that she treated him badly, and he decided to punish her. - He decided to revenge himself on her for her ill treatment. [2] I'd like mean that some people treated her badly, and he decided to punish them. - He decided to revenge her on them for their ill treatment for her. Thank you very much. Enjoy the still of night.Read More...

The function of "but"

The following sentence is from the news contributed by The Associated Press. ******************** Meanwhile, Wesley Clark and John Edwards exchanged charges as they focused their attention on Tuesday's contests in Tennessee and Virginia. They all but ignored this weekend's contests. ******************** I found the use of but in this sentence quite interesting. It seems like it functions as an emphatic element in the sentence because if it is omitted the sentence still reads just fine.Read More...

"Be wanting" and "want"

How is "be wanting" different from simple present, past, present perfect form of "want"? It looks like to me that there is some emphasis on the speakers' mind when they use progressive forms. Here are some examples of my corpus search. 1. Everybody came into this game wanting to go 3-0," running back Buddy Rodgers said. "We've been wanting to show people that we are a true team this year. 2. I've been wanting to give a keynote address at MacWorld for years, Loevner joked. 3. He said he was...Read More...

"Low" or "lower"

Because their skin is so thin, frogs are also sensitive to (lower, low)atmospheric ozone caused by pollution from industry and cars. Which is correct? And why? thanksRead More...

MTR train

Usually, we say 'We travel by train' or 'We travel by MTR( Mass Trasit Railway'. But is it correct to say ' We travel by MTR train'?Read More...

"Very easily for us to understand"

From Hogel: Would you modify these sentences into (a) natural expression(s)? - He explained it very easily for us to understand (it) easily. - He explained it very easily for us to understand (it).Read More...

Using or omitting the object

Hello, teachers! [1] Could you please tell me which is correct or natural, using the object or omitting it? 1. He spoke too low for us to hear (him). [I think both are OK, but using 'him' is better. Am I right?] 2. He spoke too quickly to understand (him). [I think both are OK, but using 'him' is better. Am I right?] 3. His voice was too weak/low to understand (him/it). [I think that using 'him' is the best and using 'him' is the next. And omitting 'him/it' is correct, but using 'it' is...Read More...

The doer of the to-infinitive

Hello teachers! Would you please tell me which is more natural, to use 'for us/me' or not? 1. His voice was too weak/low [for us] to understand him. 2. The radio signal was too weak [for me] to hear/read. [* I think 'hear' is appropriate for a radio program, and 'read' is appropriate for a radio code such as Morse Code. Am I right?] Thank you very much. Enjoy the largest full moon of the year.Read More...

Modals

What are the differences in meaning, if any, in each group of sentences? 1. a. May I use your phone? b. Could I use your phone? c. Can I use your phone? 2. a. It might not be Sally. b. It may not be Sally. c. It couldn't be Sally. d. It can't be Sally. 3. a. I have to go. b. I should go. c. I'm supposed to go. d. I'd better go. What do the sentences below mean or imply? 1. She should have done well on the test. Do we know whether she did well on the test or not? 2. I didn't have to go to...Read More...
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