All Forum Topics

"both" position

tommy
Hi teachers, i saw this sentence from somewhere Greece and Denmark will both be anxiously looking for only their second victory in five games can i change the position of "both" in the same meaning as followings? 1.) Greece and Denmark both will be anxiously looking for only their second victory in five games. and 2.)Both Greece and Denmark will be anxiously looking for only their second victory in five games. Very thank youRead More...

'Still', 'yet', & negation

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me which is acceptable? 1. There isn't still/yet any medicine for the disease. 2. There isn't any medicine for the disease still/yet. 3. There is still/yet no medicine for the disease. 4. There is no medicine for the disease still/yet. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

How to use the word like properly

Hi, I would be grateful for your views on the word like in the following sentence and its use generally: Without it, we would have no vaccinations against diseases such as polio, no drugs such as antibiotics and no treatments like x-rays or radiotherapy. I can't work out if this sentence is correct and why i.e. the use of the word like in the sentence. I read in a book that we must not confuse "like" and "such as". Like makes a comparison; such as introduces examples: Fruit trees, like...Read More...

not to hear, to not hear

I was taught (1) is correct but not (2). (1) He pretended not to hear me. (2) He pretended to not hear me. The negative word "not" or "never" should be placed before the infinitive. But there are instances where a negative word does appear after the infinitive. (3) Top 10 Reasons to Not Shop On Line. Can (3) be the same as "Top 10 reasons not to shop on line"? How are we supposed to explain the difference? Thank you always for your help. AppleRead More...

'Too' & negation

Hello, teachers! 1. I, too, haven't heard of it before. 2. I haven't heard of it before, either. Which is the correct answer, A or B? A. Both are correct, but #2 is better. B. Only #2 is correct. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Parallelism

Hello, teachers! 1. It is more difficult to learn Norwegian than English. 2. Norwegian is more difficult to learn than English. Which is the correct answer, A or B? A. Both are correct, but #2 is better. B. Only #2 is correct. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Assistance with sentence contruction including commas and semicolons

Hi, I would like some help with 2 sentences. They are as follows: 1. A penchant for shoes "they make an outfit, you can't cheat with cheap shoes" and Hermès scarves has her sporting them as tops. I think this sentence is totally wrong and have reworded as below. Does the sentence at point 2 work? 2. A penchant for shoes "they make an outfit, you can't cheat with cheap shoes" and sporting Hermès scarves as tops. I think there should be a semicolon after the word outfit, do you agree? Should...Read More...

Based on

Hello, teachers! Look at these sentences, please! 1. People tend to be initially attracted to someone based on appearances. 2. Based on appearances, people tend to be initially attracted to someone. I feel Sentence 2 is strange, but I don't know why. Is it because it is dangling or just a word/phrase order problem? Or is it also acceptable? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

few/ a few

tommy
Hi, Teachers please let's me know what's difference between few and a few by this sentence. The transfer of Tom from A company to B company has been delayed for a few/few weeks. Very thank youRead More...

Meaning of 'even'

tommy
Hi, everyone please take a look this sentence * She conceded even before all the votes had been counted. i am not native English speaker, but ,eventually, i have found even , in this case , "even = in plain emotional manner" or "even = quietly" . it's obvious that ,in my opinion, English, sometime it's beautiful ,and sometime it's quite hard to understand. my question is that why they didn't write it easier She conceded quietly before all the votes had been counted. Anyway i have to use...Read More...

Colons

Dear Rachel, Sill, I am not sure when to use a comma before quotes or can I always use a colon? Some examples: 1. International training manager Laura Nicholson cites what she believes sets La Prairie apart: "We truly believe in what we do because we have fallen in love with the brand." I think a colon is ok here. 2. Her long-standing tried and tested personal experience is the best credit to the brand. "I have used La Prairie for years now and I know many who have stayed loyal to us for...Read More...

south of France - should south be in caps?

Hi, Should south of France be in caps in this sentence and if so why? This time of year the south of France is a wonderful place to appreciate the joys of topless motoring. Thanks. Siva.Read More...

many/a lot of

tommy
i had [many/a lot of] letters yesterday. 1.) many or a lot of? we had [many/a lot of] rain yesterday. 2.) many or a lot of? please help and very thank youRead More...

an optimal/optimum point?

tommy
Dear, Teachers i am designing something and calculating by using computer programming to achieve an optimum/optimal point. i am still doubtful. please help me what's difference in deeply detail of them? Very thank youRead More...

have been/are and of/in?

tommy
Hi, Teachers I had read some books and i saw something like this "Tom and Jim are in the room." Later, i have seen this sentence Tom has agreed that Jim's performances "have been of" the highest standard recently. - What's difference between have been and are ? - What's difference between in and of ? please take a look at these sentences. Set A. 1.) Tom has agreed that Jim's performances "have been of" the highest standard recently. 2.) Tom has agreed that Jim's performances "are of" the...Read More...

for/to ?

tommy
ABC Company made an offer of $1,000,000 for/to XYZ Company's Tom. for/to ? very thank youRead More...

natural or not

Hello I'd like to know whether these following sentences, whose subjects are not person, are naturally used or too formal. 1) This road will lead you to the city hall. 2) A twenty-minute walk will take you to the station. 3) The typoon prevented us from going out. 4) Your help enabled me to finish this project sooner. 5) The weather forecast says that it will rain tomorrow. Thank you.Read More...

nominate, select, and appoint

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me which is the correct choice? 1. President Carter nominated him [nothing, to be, as, for] Secretary of State. 2. President Carter selected him [nothing, to be, as, for] Secretary of Defence. 3. President Carter appointed him [nothing, to be, as, for] Secretary of Commerce. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

waiting/awaiting

tommy
Tom has to postpone his transferring for two weeks waiting/awaiting a decision to grant a work permit. waiting or awaiting? very thank youRead More...

about "and"

Hi teachers, I was taught to use "and" when I needed to connect a serious of things. I don't understand the following sentences. Why is "and" not used in these sentences? (1)You could hear women lamenting, children crying, men shouting. (2) Some were calling for parents, others for children or spouses.Read More...

Exam result or exam results

Hi, I have finished four papers already, and took the fifth paper in Decembre last yeaer. I am waiting for my result. I think it should be results. Is it ok to say result or results? When do you say result and when do you say results and why. I asked someone and they said we say results because there is more than one person taking the exam and so it is results collectively. My response - well is it result if only one person is taking the exam and there is only one paper? Thanks. Siva.Read More...

have, make, a causative verb

Please take a look at the two sentences below. (1) What made you think so? (2) What had you think so? Are they both correct? I know (1) is correct and can be rephrased as "Why do you think so?" What about (2)? It sounds a bit awkward to me. But in the following site, there is a sentence (3). (3)I don't think I've yet read a book that had me think so much on life before. http://216.239.57.104/search?q=cache:JQUL8nFBVewJ:www.brandewyne.com/titles/...Read More...

'Either' with 'or'

This question has been sent in by Ricky. "It's always my mum or my brother who annoys me." "It's always either my mum or my brother who annoys me."Read More...

Magistrate(-s / 's / s') Court?

This question comes in from Esme : I would like to know whether you think there should be an apostrophe after the word Magistrates in the description of Magistrates Court i.e. should this be Magistrates' Court or Magistrates Court?Read More...
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