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As well as

Can we put the phrase 'as well as' at the beginning of a sentence? Is the following sentence correct? As well as making the corridors smelly,this also attracts cockroaches and even rats.Read More...

Impressed AT?

Can "impressed" be used with a preposition "at" as used in this sentence? though impressed at the company's incredible winning streak through such acts as Britney Spears, R. Kelly, Nsync, The Backstreet Boys and Joe. PromegaXRead More...

Verb forms in questions

Why is it that sometimes helping verbs are necessary in forming questions and sometimes they are not? example - "who visited you?" vs. "who did you visit?"Read More...

The noun "curiosity"

I read something today which I thought would be considered grammatically wrong in standard textbook English, but I wasn´t totally sure. It was a sentence where the noun "curiosity" was followed by the preposition "of", followed by a gerund; something like: "He no longer has the curiosity of reading tourist guides". I´m aware that one can be "curious about something" or "curious to do something" or there may be "curiosity about something" but is it normal to say "have the curiosity of doing...Read More...

"Was being"

Hallo, It`s greenrat again. I`ve got a question to ask. When do we say "He was being unfair / He was being funny"? What is "being unfair"? Gerund or participle? And what do we need that structure for? Is it past continuous or not? I mean why would we use it instead of simple past like "he was unfair"? Thank u / wish u all the best yuri greenrat@yandex.ruRead More...

Regret doing == regret having done?

S1 I regret having called him a thief, but I regret even more his stealing my watch. S2 I regret calling him thief, but I regret even more his having stolen my watch. S1 comes from the Longman Contemporary English-Chinese Dictionary (1988:1186), an English dictionary with Chinese translation. S2 is my imitation of it. Do S1 and S2 have the same meaning? (I think they mean the same because, in these sentences, what one regrets is something that has already taken place.) Thank you.Read More...

"Who is..." or "who are..."

When you ask, "Who is coming to your party?" but you know there will be many people, why do we use "who is" rather than "who are"? There must be a simple answer to this, but I can't seem to come up with it. Thanks for your help, Lois Bascom loisbascom@schooloflanguage.comRead More...

Phrasal verb: "put up with "

I am attending an Applied Linguistics class this spring at the School for International Training (SIT). This week we've been engaged in a lively debate about a particular phrasal verb. Here goes... "put up with" Is it a verb + particle + particle or verb + particle + preposition? We've been using "The Grammar Book" by Marianne Celce-Murcia and Diane Larsen-Freeman as our main resource. Our instructor has encouraged us to explore other avenues of enlightenment outside of our text. We hope you...Read More...

Modals and simple pres/past with expressions of urgency

Originally posted March 28, 2003 11:10 PM I found in a corpus that in "suggestion-that clauses ""must","could","might" can also be used. e.g. ...suggestion that she ought to have a man to knock round and look... ...suggestion that it would seem more natural for her to summon Sophy Viner... It is the same case with "essential that" clauses: ...suggestion that any one are... her could be sick.... ... a Reference Number will be given and it is essential that this number is written in the space...Read More...

Special meaning of "though"???

Needless to say, word soon spread about Nivea in A&R offices across the country. Both manager and artist had their sights set on Jive Records, though impressed at the company's incredible winning streak through such acts as Britney Spears, R. Kelly, Nsync, The Backstreet Boys and Joe. The above sentence is an excerpt from an article about Nivea Hamilton. You can see the whole article at http://www.hiponline.com/artist/music/n/nivea/ I have 2 questions about this sentence. 1. What does...Read More...

"The third" or "a third"?

We usually use "the" with ordinal numbers. But sometimes "a/an" is used with them such as "a third" and so on. What is the difference between "the third" and "a third" ? Thank you. KenRead More...

"Whole nother"

This may not actually be a "grammar" question, but it's an interesting phenomenon: Why do we often say "a whole nother" instead of "another whole," as in, "The piece of cake was so good, I ate a whole nother one"? Susan sgzamora@hotmail.comRead More...

Names of sports teams -- singular or plural?

What about plurals in the use of sports teams: The Bulls are a good team. The Magic is a team from Orlando. During World Cup soccer, many announcers were using sentences such as, "The U.S. are in the quarterfinals." Is this a difference in British/American/World English? Jon jlath@lssm.orgRead More...

"Supposed to"

Do sentences with "was/were supposed to" always signal past unfulled expectation? Suzan suzanoni@metu.edu.trRead More...

"Used to" -- which auxiliary

Which auxiliary refers to "used to": "did" or "was"? A: I used to be a French teacher. B: Really! I did, too. OR B: Really! I was too. What I want to say is "I was, too." Is it correct? Barbara barbara@bsml.comRead More...

Modals of possibility

Which one of the following modals expresses the highest level of probability: may, might or could ? What's the difference: I may go to the store I might go to the store I could go to the store? Please give examples and explanation. Szilvia szekelyszilvia@hotmail.com [This message was edited by Grammar Exchange on April 06, 2003 at 08:01 AM.]Read More...

Noun clauses beginning with "that" in subject postion

How common are that noun clauses in subject position in written academic discourse? Do you include information from corpus research? Thank you. Suzan suzanoni@metu.edu.tr [This message was edited by Grammar Exchange on April 06, 2003 at 07:49 PM.] [This message was edited by Grammar Exchange on April 07, 2003 at 06:46 AM.]Read More...

"Going home"

Why do we say: "I'm going home " and NOT "I'm going to home "? We say: "to the store,""to the airport" -- why is "home" different? Susan smiller@bement.orgRead More...

"Graduate" or "graduate from"

Which is correct: I graduated from high school. I graduated high school. Jan jansears@hotmail.com [This message was edited by Grammar Exchange on April 05, 2003 at 10:35 AM.]Read More...

Pres. perf. simple vs. pres. perf. continuous

(Reposted from old newsgroup on 3/14/03) Could you tell me which one is the correct answer of the sentences below? Why? 1) Somebody has been eating/ has eaten my chocolates. There aren't many left. 2) Thank you very much for the camera.I have been wanting/ I have wanted it for ages, Hakan BüLKEN serhannevin@ttnet.net.tr [This message was edited by Grammar Exchange on March 24, 2003 at 10:46 AM.]Read More...

'Will' after 'if' and 'when'

I would like to take the opportunity to ask something about a different point. It is sometimes emphasized in grammar books that using "will" is not possible after subordinating conjunctions such as "if" and "when". I think this happens only when you´re talking about true adverbial clauses, but not in the case of noun clauses and adjective clauses. After all, even though it´s considered ungrammatical to say things like "I will go with you tomorrow if I will have time", and "When he will...Read More...

Subjunctive *with modals* in noun clauses?

In the Blue Azar, it is stated that with subjunctive noun clauses, "should" and "ought to" are acceptable in the noun clause. I teach my students that no modals are acceptable -- that the noun clause verb must be in the base form. What are others doing? Diane christod@scc-fl.eduRead More...

Adverbial and noun phrases

Is it right to say that generally speaking, when we have - ing noun phrases, the -ing word is a gerund (and the noun phrase can be replaced by a noun), and in -ing adverbial phrases, the -ing word is a present participle (in which case the ing phrase cannot be replaced by a noun). Are the following ways of classifying the words/phrases correct? While going there, he came up with a good plan while going there = adverbial phrase while = subordinating conjunction going = participle After...Read More...
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