All Forum Topics

"To" -- part of infinitive phrase or not in these examples?

In the following sentences, are the phrases beginning with "to" examples of infinitive phrases? 1. The president is to arrive this evening. 2. You are to finish the report by tomorrow. 3. Our new ads are to be seen in all the newspapers. 4. After their fight, John and Mary were never to see each other again. 5. If you are to sell products, you must be an aggressive salesperson. Thanks!Read More...

Noun + Passive Present Participle(PPP) & Absolute Phrase

The main difference between Noun + PPP and Absolute Phrase is that the former can function as object or subject in a sentence, object of a preposition, whereas the latter is independent of mainclause, though Noun+PPP and Absolute Phrase have same forms. Comments are appreciated.Read More...

Not only...but also

Is it necessary that when "Not only"... is in the beginning of the sentence, an inversion of subject must follow? What do you think of the following sentences? Not only the constant silence but also the refusal to even provide us some small measure of assistance in our quest for justice reflects the strong interests behind the fire. Not only the CBI but all crime detection forces and prosecutors need to be independent of the administration.Read More...

"Give someone fits" and "have someone in fits" -- the same?

Dear experts, Would you say that the expressions below DO NOT correlate in the ir respective meanings, or may it be that my list of their meanings is incomplete: give someone fits have someone in fits give someone fits - (coll.) 1. strongly surprise or outrage a person: Mom said I'm cursed - my first pie was perfect and the rest, apparently, will give me fits. 2. inflict humiliating defeat on a person: Timmy was up against a big Australian kid who'd given me fits at Wimbledon. 3. scold smb.Read More...

Absolute Phrase

Can absolute phrase be substituted for noun phrase (1) He being unable to communicate caused problems. (2) His being unable to communicate caused problems. In (1), subject is Absolute Phrase, whereas in (2), subject is a Gerund.Read More...

"Change of" or "change in" plans?

Hello, Which is correct please ? 1) There has been a change IN plans. 2) There has been a change OF plans. Thank you. RickyRead More...

Dates

jluis
Is it correct to use dates like this: Monday, January 12th, 2004 Or should we avoid using Ordinal numbers: Monday, January 12, 2004 JLUIS José Luis MuñozRead More...

"Front man" and "frontsman"

Dear experts, Which of the meanings of FRONT MAN can be rendered by the compound FRONTSMAN: front man - (also: frontman) 1. a man who publicly represents a person or an organization: The former adviser now serves as a front man for a large foundation. 2. a usually respectable man who serves as a cover for illegal activities: Department of Justice investigators believe that Earl Browder is a mere front-man. 3. the leader of a band: To hire New Orleans players and then leave them free to play...Read More...

Phraseological variants?: "get in/ into the way"

Dear experts, Would you say the expressions below share ONE or BOTH meanings (in which case the preposition is not semantically relevant): get in the way of something get into the way of something get in the way something - hinder smth.; interfere with smth.: She would never try to get in the way of his career. get into the way of something - 1. acquire the habit of doing smth.: Once I got into the way of it, we spent the afternoon riding the horses down to the beach. 2. = get in the way...Read More...

Leaving out 'to'

1. They turn out to cost more than they originally seemed. 2. They turn out to cost more than they originally seemed to. Which one of the above is true?Read More...

"Fight for dear life" and "fight for one's life."

Dear experts, Would you OK my assumption that the following expressions coincide in ONE meaning only: fight for dear life fight for one's life fight for dear life - 1. fight to protect one's life: Still he fought for dear life and as long as he held his pistol no Redman dared come near to take him. 2. (fig.) fight as though one's life were at stake: Your success could be resented by others, which may mean that you have to fight for dear life to hang on to what you've got. fight for one's...Read More...

Repeat "don't" for clarification?

My first question: Are all the four phrases grammatically correct? The second question: Can they all mean the same? The third: Can (1) mean that the word I don't know but use unconciously? The fourth: In order to make sure I mean I don't use that word and don't use it, should I repeat "don't"? 1. The word I don't know and use. 2. The word I don't know and don't use. 3. The word I neither know nor use. 4. The word I don't know or use. appleRead More...

"Preferred status to" or "preferred status over"?

Which one of the following sentences is correct? (1) Some litigants have a preferred status to another in the use of the courts. (2) Some litigants have a preferred status over others in the use of the courts.Read More...

"Leave someone alone" or "leave someone to oneself"

Dear experts, Would it be right to assume that the expressions below are interchangeable in only ONE of their meanings: leave someone alone leave someone to oneself leave someone alone - 1. go away from a place leaving people by themselves: Her parents had gone on holiday for a week, and left us alone in their big house. 2. (also: let someone alone) abstain from interfering with a person: I think, if you haven't the guts to act like a man in the matter, you ought to leave this girl alone.Read More...

More partial synonyms: "fire fight" and "fire fighting"

Dear experts, Would you concede that the expressions below are interchangeable in ONE meaning only: fire fight firefighting fire fight - 1. an exchange of fire between two opposing units (as distinct from close combat): In Kashmir, three Indian soldiers have been killed in a fire fight with separatist guerrillas. 2. the effort to extinguish or to check the spread of a fire: Despite exhaustive efforts, the building and its contents were destroyed. Several firefighters were transported to the...Read More...

"In this morning"?

Is "in" in the following sentence redundancy? Or is it wrong with "it" in? If not, does it make any difference? (1) I planted some flowers (in) this morning. appleRead More...

Whatever, whoever, however

"According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment." What are the rules on when to elide are in whatever its merits areRead More...

"In the disguise" and "under the disguise"

Dear experts, Could you comment on the difference in meaning (if any) between: in the disguise of someone under the disguise of someone Ulysses entered the palace in the disguise of a peddler and exhibited to the women his wares. The thief gained entry to the premises under the disguise of an inspector from the Electricity Board. Thank you, YuriRead More...

SVOO possible or not

I'd appreciate it if someone could tell me why 3 and 7 are out? 1. He told me the situation. 2. He told the situation to me. 3. *He explained me the situation. 4. He explained the situation to me. 5. He gave me the book. 6. He gave the book to me. 7. *He donated museum the painting. 8. He donated the painting to the museum. appleRead More...

"Wish" with "know" or "knew"?

Hello, Do we say : 1) I wouldn't wish that on anyone I KNEW OR 2) I wouldn't wish that on anyone I KNOW ? Thank you. RickyRead More...

"Is" or "are"

Could you tell me which is correct, is or are, in the following sentence? The first thing I noticed about him was/were his eyes. appleRead More...

The present perfect with a past phrase

I have learned that the present perfect tense does not occur with a phrase which indicates past, such as yesterday, when I was 10, etc. Thus (1) is grammatically wrong. (1) I have seen your sister yesterday. But I found the following sentence (2). (2) Everyone knows what biology is because we have all studied it in high school. Is this sentence grammatical? Doesn't the phrase "in high school" indicate the specific past? How should we teach the intermediate EFL students? appleRead More...

Definite article

I saw following nouns(?) 1. the more than 500 2. the be prior to something else. What is the theory behind using 'the' in the above two nouns.Read More...
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