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two times or twice

The sentences below are confusing. Which is correct and which is not? a) A is two times larger than B. b) A is twice larger than B. c) A is two times as large as B. d) A is twice as large as B. thanks!Read More...

BE SURPRISED BY

I know you usually say "she was surprised at the news". How about the sentence " she was surprised by the news" Is it wrong? THANKS!Read More...

'where' or 'in which'?

How should I complete the following sentence? It's a forum _____ (where, in which) experts will answer questions sent in by listeners. Are 'where' and 'in which' freely interchangeable? Or are there differences between them?Read More...

Find or finds

Hello, teachers! Long time no see! How have you been? Please tell me which is the correct choice. Some say only 'find' is correct, and some say both are correct. Would you be the judge? - My hope is that he [find, finds] something cheaper. [meaning; I hope that he finds something cheaper.] One more question, please! We can omit the ' that 's, right? Thank you very much. Enjoy the unseasonable hot weather. Best Regards.Read More...

Prepositions

Dear all, Would you please help me to fill in the blanks in the following sentences? In chess, a knight can jump from a white square ..... a black square and vice-versa. (onto, into) The white Queen should always be .... a white square at the beginning of the game. (in, on) She drew a circle on the floor and asked me to jump ...... it. (into, onto) There I was standing ..... the circle on the floor. (in, on) Thanking you, Aneeth PrabhakarRead More...

More on capital letters

This question has been sent in by Susan. The moon landing - should this be in caps -- i.e. the Moon Landing -- or the moon landing? When can the moon landing be in caps e.g. - So it was more than a decade from the first moon landing to the first flight of the Space Shuttle. And we are long overdue for its replacement. Thanks.Read More...

in the tennis court

Instead of saying on the tennis court, is there any situation that we may use in the tennis court?Read More...

"Master's degree," "masters' degree," or "masters degree"?

This question has been sent in from "Anonymous" : The university offers 34 master's degree programs. OR The university offers 34 masters degree programs. OR The university offers 34 masters' degree programs. AND I got my master's in political science. OR I got my masters in political science. OR I got my masters' in political science. Thank you.Read More...

Agreement with correlative conjunctions.

Hello to all. Would you please give me any advice about "either" and "neither"? Either the libraly or book stores have current magazines. Neither book stores nor the library has the novel. Do either horror stories or a suspenseful story appeal to you? Has neither Tom nor the other students read the book yet? I hear the verb should agree with the noun after "or" or "nor" in affirmative sentences, but, in interrogative sentences, the verb agree with the nearer noun. Is it true? I've seen some...Read More...

since 3 months ago

Is "Since 3 months ago"... acceptable if I would want to express that the patient has been e.g. doing a certain thing for the past 3 months?Read More...

'Think' and 'not'

I have a question about the following sentences: 1. I don't think he is coming. 2. I think he is not coming. As far as I know, the first sentence is correct (where 'not' is used in the subordinate clause). But is the second sentence correct or wrong? Any rules here?Read More...

Unreal mixed with real

Dear All, Are the following sentences correct ? 1) I was wondering if I wrote to you and you were away, would I have to wait till you got back before I get a reply ? 2) I was wondering if I wrote to you and you have gone away ( or are away), would I have to wait till you got back before I get a reply ? Am I right in saying that (1) is totally 'unreal' while (2) is 'unreal' except for the bit about the person being away. Also, does ' before I get a reply' indicate a present situation that I'm...Read More...

"I've known I had" or "I've known I have"

Dear All, Please take a look at the following sentences : 1)I've always known I had bad skin. 2)I've always known I have bad skin. Q: Are both sentences grammatically correct ? Q: If yes, is the differecence being that in (1) I no longer have bad skin whereas in (2) the bad skin remains ? Thank you. RickyRead More...

if there ever was (X)

Dear All, A while back I asked about a sentence with the phrase "If ever there was ..." in it and Marilyn Martin explained that the phrase "is an idiomatic expression ...". My question now is to ask if the following sentence falls in the same category "If John was ever smart, I'm Albert Einstein." Thank you. RickyRead More...

"It felt as if" and "I felt as if"

I have recently come across the following sentence(1) in an article of a newspaper. Does the phrase "it felt as if" mean something similar to "I felt as if"? This "it" doesn't have a particular meaning. Is that correct? I mean this "it" doesn't refer to anything particular. (1) Sometimes during those rough high school years, it felt as if that little dog was my only friend. AppleRead More...

'Do you think'

"What time do you think you leave?" [when do you leave, do you think?] what is the rule for forming such a question within a question? Is this a form of embedded question? Thanks...Read More...

"Best/the best"

Are both sentences correct? 1.What kind of food do you like best? 2.What kind of food do you like the best? When will we use the phrase "the best"Read More...

"Earlier than her" or "earlier than she"

I am somewhat confused by what is explained in Basic Grammar in Use published by Cambridge university: S1: I can run faster than him. S2: I can run faster than he can. The book says you can say either S1 or S2. I thought "him" is used when comparing objects and "he" is used when comparing subjects. What is really the correct way? In S2, can I omit "can" and just say S3: I can run faster than he. ? Is there a difference between British way and American way of expressing comparative?Read More...

Hyphen in 'Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation' ?

From the cover of the famous book on punctuation: Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. Does the compound word, like zero tolerance, need to be hyphenated here? That is the title should read "Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero- Tolerance Approach to Punctuation." Does the initial capitals in this title render the hyphenation optional?Read More...

"Finished" as an adjective

Hi. It's been a long time. Would you check out this sentence? I'm not finished eating. Is it okay? I think it needs 'with' after 'finished' thanks a lotRead More...

"Happen to" or "happen with"

Dear experts, Would you say that HAPPEN TO and HAPPEN WITH are freely interchangeable in their respective contexts. Thank you, YuriRead More...

"About" with a capital letter?

This question was sent in by Susan McKenzie My question is - is the word "about" in capitals in a heading like this - And Finally... Something about Me and What I Do. About is a preposition but it is 5 letters. Some say about should be lower case and some because it is 5 letters it can be in capitals. Grateful for any assitance.Read More...
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