All Forum Topics

"Don't you know" or "don't you know it"?

Dear experts, Would you say that the following phrases are not interchangeable in any of their contexts: don't you know don't you know it don't you know - 1. I thought you knew: 'We're supposed to either sign these contracts or rewrite them. Which is it?' 'Don't you know?' 2. (also: you know) is used as a rhetorical question: My wife is such a nervous woman, don't you know. don't you know it - you can be absolutely sure about that; you're exactly right: 'Man, is it hot!' 'Don't you know it!'...Read More...

"Lost" or "losing" and "won" or "winning" with "team"?

(1) The members of the winning team were given gold medals. The sentence above means that the members of the team that had won were given gold medals. They were not in the process of winning but they had already won. You never say "the won team". But (2) The members of the lost team were not given gold medals. The sentence above means that the team that had lost were not given gold medals. You can also say, "the lost team". (3) The members of the losing team were being encouraged by the...Read More...

"Don't ask" vs. "don't ask me"

Dear experts, According to the dictionary definitions I found for DON'T ASK / DON'T ASK ME: don't ask - is used to tell a person that the answer is so depressing one wouldn't even want to hear it: How am I? Don't ask. don't ask me - is used to tell smb. that one does not know the answer: She's decided to dye her hair bright green, don't ask me why. Does it follow the the expressions in question are NOT interchangeable in their respective contexts? Thank you, YuriRead More...

"While" and "during"

The sentence 1 is ungrammatical because a clause has to follow メwhileモ. I think 3 is still a bad sentence with メonモ, or is it somehow acceptable? Can 3 considered as a reduced sentence of 4,? 1. *I visited Paris while the vacation. 2. I visited Paris during the vacation. 3. *I visited Paris while on the vacation. 4. I visited Paris while I was on the vacation. mitsukoRead More...

"Have a dash at" or "make a dash at"

Dear experts, Would you confirm that in the sentences below the expression MAKE A DASH AT can only be replaced by HAVE A DASH AT in the first instance: 1. We were now at the Frank Hotel, where French would seem to be most appropriate. We found out afterwards, however, that it was our friend's habit, when travelling in any foreign country, to make a dash at French, even if the people understood English perfectly well. 2. Allen drew up his men, addressed them in his own emphatic style, and...Read More...

It is, she is, that is

Imagine a situation where you are referring to someone walking outside. You say "Who is that?" In response to this question, which of the following is (are) correct? If all of them or two of them are acceptable, what is the difference? 1. It's Ms. Green, our new neighbor. 2. That's Ms Green, our new neighbor. 3. She's Ms. Green our new neighbor. Also I have found the following example. 4. It's the Smiths. 5. It's the same mom and dad. Isn't it necessary to use "they are" instead of "it is"...Read More...

"Do the dishes" vs. "do up the dishes"

Dear experts, May we assume that the expressions below are freely interchangeable in both meanings syntactical variants: do the dishes do up the dishes do up the dishes - 1. wash (and dry) the plates, dishes, etc. after a meal: Dad came over and did up the dishes, mopped the kitchen floor, and even vacuumed the living room. 2. cook meals: The food-menu consists of vegetarian dishes done-up in various manners. What about MAKE THE DISHES? Thank you, YuriRead More...

"Cover for someone" vs. "cover up for someone"

Dear experts, Are the expressions COVER FOR SOMEONE and COVER UP FOR SOMEONE freely interchangeable in both meanings or only in one: cover for someone cover up for someone cover for someone - 1. carry out the essential duties of a fellow employee, absent through sickness, etc.: I will cover for you while you are away. 2. conceal smb.'s wrongdoing; provide an excuse for a person: She said that Zaikas had covered for Isaac, who was a party to the state-hospital scandal. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Numbers

Which of the following sentences include both 10 and 20? 1. 10 through 20. 2. from10 to 20 3. between 10 and 20. 4. from 10 up to 20. I have asked an American and a Canadian and each says different things. appleRead More...

"Skull hunter"

Dear experts, In the following context SKULL HUNTER apparently refers to a person conducting archeological excavations: You win fame as the most proficient of young skull-hunters - and wander over the face of the globe, digging up bones like an old dog. 1. Is this usage current and familiar or just an author's metaphor? 2. Is it colloquial or professional jargon? Thank you, YuriRead More...

How to read the time

What time is it? (1) It's 7:40. (1) is usually read メseven -fortyモ. Is it wrong to say メItユs 40 minutes past (after) sevenモ? Do you always say メ Itユs twenty (minutes) to(of) eightモ? mitsukoRead More...

"So that"

Is it true that the use of so that in the following sentence is a poor usage? She worked late so that she could complete the work. The reference I found suggests that it is an incorrect use of the phrase. The correct sentence should read: She worked late so that the work was completed. To me, sentence #1 sounds quite natural. What do you think?Read More...

"Make" + object + ~ing or ~ed form

I know that "make" is a causative verb being followed by object and infinitive verb, as in "I made him go." But, I'd like to know if ~ing or ~ed form (participles) can take the place of the infinitive.Read More...

There is no point ~ing and It is no use ~ing

I feel the two phrases are very similar, but seems not exactly the same. Could you help me find any difference between the two expressions, either in terms of meaning or of context? Thanks once more.Read More...

Phrasal verb: "fall over"

Hello, Can the phrasal verb "fall over" be used in the following sentence as "come across" something? or to discover something. 1) While I was going through the boxes I fell over some old memories. 2) When I was reading the article I fell over this juicy piece of information. Is it used in the colloquial language. Thank YouRead More...

"With my foot on the seat of his pants"

Could you help me with the following expression? I paid"”with my foot firm on the seat of his pants. My guess is that he paid the money but didn't completely trust the payee, so, he has all the information necessary to get it back when the time comes. Am I possibly right? I couldn't find this idiom in my dictionaries. Thank you. appleRead More...

" Born in " or " Born at "

Please help me to find out which one of the following is correct: 1- I was born at New York. 2- I was born in New York. I have come across both "Born at" and " Born in", so which one really is correct. Thank you. CyrusRead More...

"Connect someone to someone" vs. "connect someone with someone"

Dear experts, Would you say that CONNECT SOMEONE TO SOMEONE can replace CONNECT SOMEONE WITH SOMEONE in all four meanings (resp. contexts): 1. There is not yet any reason beyond the resemblance in the place-name to connect the people of Ahhiyawa with the Achaians of Greece. 2. Operator, will you please connect me with Mr. Jones? 3. She had an acquaintance in Germany who could connect me with a family for whom I could be a housemaid. 4. (usually Passive) Her family is connected with the...Read More...

"At a stretch" or "on the stretch"

Dear experts, Would you confirm that the expressions below have only ONE meaning in which they are freely interchangeable: at a stretch on the stretch at a stretch - 1. continuously; without interruption: It was impossible to work for more than an hour or so at a stretch. 2. by making a special effort; by stretching one's resources: We have provided food for only fifty people, but we might be able to make it do for sixty at a stretch. on the stretch - 1. tightened and extended: The mariner...Read More...

"Who he is," or "who is he" in noun clauses

Please look at the following sentence. (1) Who is he? When this sentence is embedded in another phrase "we can not tell", it becomes, (2) We can not tell who he is. Not, (3) We can not tell who is he. Am I correct up until here? Then please look at the following sentence that I found in The Boxcar Children series (4) In those days, we could not tell who was a friend and who was an enemy. We don't have to change this to (5) We could not tell who a friend was and who an enemy was? I feel (5)...Read More...

"A lot of the time"

Please consider the following sentence: Computers may not really think, but, driven by emotion, hormones, ego, reflex or whatever, neither do we a lot of the time . I am not sure about the use of the phrase a lot of the time here. Is it different, in terms of meaning and usage, from a lot of times in the following sentences? A lot of times when someone enters the judicial system, they're trapped there forever. We know we tried to do something. It helps, and a lot of times it works.Read More...

"On the run" or "on a run"

Dear experts, Would you confirm that the expressions below share only ONE meaning in which they may be interchangeable (YES/NO): on a run on the run on a run - 1. running: Colonel Armant came on a run to find out who gave the order to fire. 2. (of a dog) on a leash: My parents live in rural yet townish sort of area - we had a dog we kept on a run. 3. (of a dog) exercise in running: Likes to go for long walks in the park and good for anyone who wants to take a dog on a run. 4. on a single...Read More...

"Weep about something" or "weep at something"

Dear experts, Would you concede that there's indeed some subtle difference in the meaning of the expressions below, which makes them non-interchangeable without detriment as to meaning: weep about something weep at something weep about something - cry to express one's grief concerning smth.: Even northern ministers present at that meeting conceded that Ironsi seemed genuinely upset by, and wept about the death of his military colleagues. weep at something - cry in the presence of that which...Read More...
×
×
×
×