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That and which

Hi, I really am not sure when to use that or which -are there any simple explanations that may help me to understand better. For example 1. roasted chicken in morel cream sauce which tastes of the morel mushrooms. Is which ok and why? 2. All living areas are located on the second floor which opens straight on to a garden with a large swimming pool. I would prefer that but others prefer which. Many thanks for any assistance you can provide. Warmest regards, SivaRead More...
Although some borderline cases do occur, most relative clauses can be recognized as being clearly either restrictive or nonrestrictive. A restrictive relative clause either selects or identifies the [kind of] thing or person that it describes. For example "” What kind of movies do you like best? "” I like movies that/which make me cry The relative clause "that make me cry" tells the listener which kind of movies the speaker likes. It selects . A restrictive relative clause also identifies :...Read More...

Commas and hyphens between adjectives

Hi, Do we need commas after chic and incredible? Sorry but I still need help concerning this area. A Commas between adjectives: 1. This chic multi-label store 2. Other incredible dream buys B Hyphens between adjectives: Also with regard to adjectives where there is a hypen between the two - how do we know which adjectives need a hyphen between them? I have read that one way to assist is to look up the dictionary to see if the word is hyphenated in the dictionary - however there are lots of...Read More...
The first phrase should not have a comma. A "multi-label store" is in itself a noun compound. It is similar to "department store" or "discount store." "Chic" is the only adjective modifying the noun compound, so there is no comma. _______ The second phrase should not have a comma either, for the same reason as the first phrase. "Dream" serves as part of the noun compound "dream buys." "Dream" is used in many word combinations, in dream girl, dream house , and dream team , for example.Read More...

Subject verb agreement.

Hi, Could you please assist me with this old chestnut again - subject and verb agreement. 1. Sentence: One of the few available walls in the dining-room showcases a huge collage of Asian faces Should it be showcase or showcases. If the subject is walls then it is showcase but if we take it from dining-room then it is showcases. Grateful if you could explain what it should be. Thanks. Warmest regards, Siva.Read More...
Thanks SivaRead More...

spring-summer or spring/summer - are both correct?

Hi, Grateful for your assistance on this one. The following sentence is written as follows: And this spring-summer season sees the launch of shiny, stylish creations to light up the years to come. Could you please confirm whether the hyphen between spring and summer is correct? My understanding is that it is correct to use either a hyphen or a slash. Do you agree? I base my understanding on the following reasearch: 1. A hyphen is used to join two or more words serving as a single adjective...Read More...
Thanks. SivaRead More...

perfect and perfect progressive

In the dialogue below, can you use simple perfect as well as perfect progressive? (i.e. "he must not have expected you) A: When I arrived, Dennis looked surprised. B: He must not have been expecting you.Read More...
Yes, "he must not have expected you" would also be acceptable. However, "he must not have been expecting you" emphasizes that he was in the middle of not expecting you when you arrived. It is probably the exact form of the verb that you want. "He must not have expected you" does not necessarily refer to the action's being in progress at the moment that you arrived. It could, but it could also mean that he was not expecting you at previous times and indeed had not even thought of you at or...Read More...

gerund or infinitive as a subject

Question: Is it wrong to say "I think that to study a foreign language is very important," or should I always use "I think that studying a foreign language is very important"? If both are correct, what's the difference?Read More...
Both the gerund, "studying," and the infinitive, "to study," are grammatically correct, but only the gerund "studying" is idiomatic and natural as the subject of a clause with an adjective or adjective phrase as the complement of "be" (as in "[X] is very important"). The infinitive is used a great deal with an adjective complement, but in a cleft sentence, with "it" as the dummy subject: "” I think it's very important to study a foreign language Interestingly, the infinitive with an...Read More...

The one who, etc.

Would you please tell me if these are acceptable and which is the correct, natural, idiomatic expression? 1. You will be the one who comes first in this contest. 2. You will be the one who will come first in this contest. 3. You will be the one to come first in this contest. 4. You will be the one coming first in this contest. Best Regards. Thank you very much.Read More...
All the versions are grammatically correct, but the most natural version is Sentence 1: 1. You will be the one who comes out (not "comes") first in this contest The rest are acceptable, but not as idiomatic as #1. Interestingly, "the (human) one that" is also widely used in informal English, when the pronoun is human and is the grammatical subject of the relative clause. That's probably because the pronoun "one" isn't felt to be specifically human. Anyway, Google shows a significant number...Read More...

Partial negation & double negation

Hello, teachers! A: It was more than twenty years ago. He doesn't remember anything. B; No. I talked with him. [________] I'd like to say the meaning "He remembers part of that" in the brackets. Which expressions can I use? And are there any other expressions? 1. He doesn't remember nothing. 2. He hasn't forgotten everything. 3. He [remembers, can remember] some/something. Best Regards.Read More...
The second sentence -- "He hasn't forgotten everything" -- is perfect. It would be spoken with the stress on "EV-," as in "He hasn't forgotten EVerything." The third sentence would be OK with a little adjustment: "He remembers/ can remember SOME things." The first sentence would not be used in normal English. RachelRead More...

except vs except for

Is there any difference between except and except for ?Read More...
There are many similarities and quite a few differences between the two expressions. Here are the differences I've come up with. Only "except" can be followed by an if- conditional clause: "” My car is at your disposal, except/*except for if you want to lend it to your brother Both expressions can be followed by prepositional phrases that are adverbials: "” I felt good all last evening except/except for after that huge meal "” The ground is dry except/except for by the pond But "except for"...Read More...

present perfect progressive

Hi! i really need your help. Please look at the senence below. It's been raining. i am so confused about what the sentence means;a)is it still raining or recently stopped? or b)does it depend on the context? thanksRead More...
It might or might not actually be raining at the moment of speaking. "¢ "It's been raining" means that it started raining at some time in the past and is raining now. The speaker doesn't know or doesn't mention whether or not it will continue to rain. Even if spoken or written without a time expression, the time expression is contained within the tense. You would mean, or think: a) It has been raining all day. b) It has been raining since noon. c) It has been raining for two hours. This...Read More...

Not to mention

Which is the possible or better choice? Some say all are fine, some say one of them is preferred, some say only one of them is correct. It seems that each individual has their own taste. Please be the judge and explain which is correct and which is preferred! - I have no money to rent such a house, not to mention [buy, buying, to buy] it. Thank you very much.Read More...
"Not to mention" is an idiom with this meaning*: not to mention Also, not to speak of; to say nothing of. In addition to, besides what's already been said. For example, I don't think the voters will want that big program, not to mention the cost , or Dave teaches trumpet and trombone, not to speak of other brass instruments , or Their house is worth at least a million, to say nothing of their other assets . _______ Quirk** describes "not to mention" as a quasi-coordinator, about which is...Read More...

Prepositions; about, around, and round

Please tell me if these prepositions are acceptable? If so, which is preferred? - The earth revolves about/around/round the sun. Best Regards.Read More...
The prepositions with "revolve" are all acceptable. "Revolve around" is by far the most common on Google. It has 1,020.000 examples. "Revolve round" has 9,900 examples, and "revolve about" has 13,700. In American English, "revolve around" is used. In British English, "round" is often used instead of "around." So, in places where British English is spoken, "revolve round" would be heard. As well, "revolve about" is not heard frequently in American English. The American Heritage Dictionary*...Read More...

Agreement; decimal

[1] When we say temperatures, we say "0 degrees, not 0 degree" and "1 degree, not 1 degrees," don't we? _______________ [2] When we say decimal numbers less than 1, what do we say? I've known that we treat it as a plural, so we say "0.1/0.2 degrees or 0.1/0.2 litters." But please check out this site. Is this correct? ******** http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/200/202/metrsty3.htm Plurals Units: Names of units are made plural only when the numerical value that precedes them is more than one. For...Read More...
The information on the website is correct. The government agency that maintains the website is the most reliable source possible for such information. The correct forms are: "” 0.1 liter (= 1 one-tenth of a liter) "” 0.2 liter (= two-tenths of a liter) "” 1/4 liter = (one-fourth of a liter) (Note that "liter" has one [t]. "Litter" is a different word.) MarilynRead More...

criticism / censure / critique ??

tommy
what's difference between the words "criticism" , "censure" ,and "critique" in deep detail ? help me to know it with examples please. thank you very much best regards ^^ note: i hope to encounter the website which has a lot of synonymous words distinguishing their difference someday.Read More...
Here are definitions of the three words you asked about from the American Heritage Dictionary*: "¢ criticism n. 1. The act of criticizing, especially adversely. 2. A critical comment or judgment. 3. a. The practice of analyzing, classifying, interpreting, or evaluating literary or other artistic works. b. A critical article or essay; a critique. c. The investigation of the origin and history of literary documents; textual criticism. "¢ censure n. 1. An expression of strong disapproval or...Read More...

Number or numbers

Hello, teachers! - Latinos make up a considerable proportion of the population in California and possess significant political clout as a corollary of their number/numbers. Which is the correct choice? Best Regards.Read More...
I'm pretty sure that "numbers" would be correct. This is the entry for "numbers" -- # 7 in the American Heritage Dictionary*: 7. numbers a. A large quantity; a multitude: Numbers of people visited the fair. b. Numerical superiority: The South had leaders, the North numbers . _______ The other entries in the dictionary for "number" are these: " 1. Mathematics. a. A member of the set of positive integers; one of a series of symbols of unique meaning in a fixed order that can be derived by...Read More...

Him or that

Hello, teachers! 1. Nobody is stronger than I am. Once there was someone, but I took care of [that]. This sentence is from a cartoon. Here, why did the writer say 'that', not 'him' (or 'her')? In this kind of case, can we use either of 'that' or 'him'? If so, how about in this sentence? Are these options all acceptable, especially 'those'? 2. I saw two little boys roller-skating on my way home. / [Those, That, They] will be Jim and Tom. Best Regards.Read More...
In your first sentence, "that" refers to the entire situation, and is correct. The entire situation is the fact that there was once somebody stronger than the speaker. The speaker took care of that situation . Yes, you could also use "him" to refer to the man who was stronger. Then the sentence would be as you suggest: "Once there was someone, but I took care of him." The "him," of course, is the masculine person who was stronger than the speaker. _______ In your second sentence, only "they"...Read More...

Be in debt

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these are acceptable? 1. The company is (as much as) three million dollars in debt. 2. The company is in debt by (as much as) three million dollars. 3. The company is in debt of (as much as) three million dollars. 4. The company is in debt (as much as) three million dollars. Best Regards.Read More...
One can say 1. The company is (as much as) three million dollars in debt 2. The company is in debt by (as much as) three million dollars Sentence 3 is not possible. You could say 3a. The company has a debt of (as much as) three million dollars 4. The company is in debt (as much as) three million dollars Informally, and rather flippantly, you could also say "” The company is in debt to the tune of (as much as) three million dollars MarilynRead More...

Prepositons; at, in, from

Hello, teachers! Are these prepositions all natural and common? If so, which is preferred? [especially in #4] 1. He asked me to dinner at/in his house. 2. He asked me to stay at/in his house. 3. I happened to meet your mother at/in a beauty parlor. 4. I bought the vase at/in/from Farmer's. Best Regards.Read More...
The possibilities are listed, with the most frequent first. 1. He asked me to dinner at his house ("in" would be used only to contrast with "outside his house") 2. He asked me to stay at his house (overnight or longer as a guest) 2a. He asked me to stay in his house (e.g. to keep watch over it but not necessarily overnight) 3. I happened to meet your mother at the beauty parlor ("The" is more common for kinds of places such as beauty parlors, supermarkets, and banks where one goes regularly...Read More...

'don't always' vs 'always don't'

Please select which of the following sentences is more correct or common. a. I don't always enjoy her company. b. I always don't enjoy her company. And I'd appreciate it if you could tell me more about the position of frequency adverbs(often, usually)- especially when they are used in negative sentences.Read More...
The first sentence – I don't always enjoy her company – is correct. This explanation form a chart in Fundamentals of English Grammar* should be helpful: "Frequency adverbs usually come between the subject and the simple present verb (except the main verb be . · Karen always tells the truth. Frequency adverbs follow be in the simple present ( am, is, are ) and the simple past ( was, were ). · Karen is always on time. In a question, frequency adverbs come directly after the subject. · Do you...Read More...

advantage of/to

what is the difference in the usage of the prepositions 'to' and 'of' before 'advantage'? Is 'to' slightly more formal usage? There are many advantages to sharing an apartment. There are many advantages of sharing an apartment. Thanks!Read More...
You can say either "” There are many advantages TO sharing an apartment OR "” There are many advantages IN sharing an apartment There is no difference in formality between the two prepositions. BUT NOT "” *There are many advantages *OF sharing an apartment The construction "there is/are" introduces an indefinite noun phrase. You can use "of" when the noun phrase is definite, but not when it's indefinite. You can say "” What are the advantages OF/TO/IN sharing an apartment? "” The advantages...Read More...

my other friends?

Can we say 'my other friends'? I thought it should be 'other friends of mine'. thanks.Read More...
Yes, you can say "my other friends." This would refer to friends who are other than the original friend or friends you were talking about, additional friends. There is a comparison with the original friend or friends. Here are some examples from Google: "¢ my other friends were accidents of geography"”they lived in the ... nameless had been harvesting my other friends to artificially boost his own circle. ... www.pcmag.com/ - Apr 23, 2005 – "¢ ... He does this to my other friends , too. I...Read More...

to follow

candyling2002
Q:In the lecture_____he will tell us something about modern English usage. A.following B.followed C.to follow D.being followed the answer is C.But I don't know why. plz...Read More...
"To follow" in the sentence is a reduced form of the relative clause "that follows," "that followed," "that will follow," "that is to follow," etc. The verb tense for which the infinitive stands depends on the time frame of the utterance. Google examples: "” Through this exhibit and in the discussion to follow [that will follow], we will trace this history as we identify major contributions to theories of mind, body and their ... serendip.brynmawr.edu/Mind/Intro.html "” But our farmers...Read More...

good / well

Hi All, In the sentence below why is "good" which is an adjective after the verb "taste" I thought you have to use an adverb to describe a verb. 1) Orange juice does not taste good. And why not :- Orange juice does not taste well.Read More...
"Good" is an adjective that goes with certain stative, or non-action verbs, or verbs that describe perception. These verbs, which take adjectives instead of adverbs, are among those often called "copulative verbs" or "linking verbs." You can't say, "Orange juice does not taste well," because that would mean that the orange juice's sense of taste wasn't working well – an impossible situation! You could, however, say, "I have a terrible cold – I can't taste well." That would mean that your own...Read More...

any country

"China has the most people of any country in the world." --> can you also say "any countries" in the above sentence?Read More...
No. In a sentence of comparison like yours, "any" means just one. In this sentence, China is one country measured against every single county in the world. You could, however, also say: "China has the most people of all countries in the world. RachelRead More...

would rather

candyling2002
We'd rather you____the account tomorrow. A.settled B.settle C.would settle D.will settle the answer is A,but I think B is right.I looked it up in the Longman dictionary.In the page 1909,there is a sentence:I'd rather stay in this evening,if that's all right with you.Read More...
Dear Marilyn, Thanks for this assistance. I'm encouraged.Now I know how to use the "would rather"Read More...
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