All Forum Topics

"everyone" and "everybody"

In most situations "everyone" and "everybody" are interchangeable, as I understand, but what is the difference if there is any? In class, I prefer "everyone" as in "Attention please, everyone", but really don't know why. Is there a difference between "nobody" and "no one", "anybody" and "anyone" and so on? AppleRead More...

"never" and "before"

Hello I'd like to know if we can use "never" and "before" in the same sentence. #1 Yuki has never been to London before. Is #1 grammatically accepted? Or does this sound strange? Thank you.Read More...

Passive with "for"?

Hello I find the following sentence in the exercise. In the case of the verb "buy", I wonder if person can be the subject in the passive sentence. I know it is OK with the verb "give" The sentence is this: #1 I was bought a nice bicycle for my birthday by my father. Is this grammatically accepted? Thank you.Read More...

used to

Hello I wonder if I can use " used to " instead of " would " in the following sentence. #1 My mother would often bake bread on Saturday mornings. #2 My mother used to often bake bread on Saturday mornings. If #2 is OK, do both sentences have the same meaning? Thank you.Read More...

what is the difference ?

Dear All, What is the difference between the following two sentences ? 1) Not a day has gone by when I didn't think of him. 2) Not a day has gone by when I have not thought of him. Thank you. RickyRead More...

Expressions for not feeling well

Hello I'd like to ask about how to express the reason of bad condition. 1) I'm sick with a fracture. 2) I'm sick with a cold. 3) I'm in bad condition with a stomachache. Would you give me some better expressions? Thank you.Read More...

Questions with "by whom"

Hello When I'd like to ask about the agent of passive voice, can I use both sentences? Or is "By whom" not used in daily life? For example: 1) By whom was the cake eaten? 2 Who was the cake eaten by? Thank you.Read More...

Transforming sentences from active to passive

Hello I'd like to ask about passive sentences. In the exercise we change some active sentence to passive sentences. If a sentence have two object, two sentences can be made. However, are both sentences natural to native speakers? Or is one of them too awkward? For example: I changed 1) to 2) and 3) 1) My uncle gave me a nice watch. 2) I was given a nice watch by my uncle. 3) A nice watch was given me by my uncle. Do 2) and 3) sound natural? Thank you.Read More...

The position of 'enough'

Hello, teachers! S1. Do we have enough bread? S2. Do we have bread enough? Is there any difference in usage or nuance? Please check my thoughts. Case I; usage While S1 is natural and common, S2 is archaic and uncommon. Case II; nuance While S1 asks if we have bread or not, S2 asks if the bread we have is enough or not, Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

"near" or "near to"

I came across the following sentence in a book by Macmillan Press. I was on duty in the area of Witley Gardens, near to the Blackburn Road. "to" is optional, right? What difference does it make, with and without "to"? Google yields 24700 examples of "near the station" and only 829 of "near to the station". AppleRead More...

The position of 'never'

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me if these are correct? 1. You [can never, never can] do it. 2. I [will never, never will] do that. 3. The course of their love [did never, never did] run smooth. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

"think it best, "know it best"

Why is #3 out, while the other two seem OK? Or is #3 also acceptable? 1. I find it best to go by subway. 2. I think it best to go by subway. 3. *I know it best to go by subway. AppleRead More...

The usage of "in which"

I'm not quite clear about how the phrase "in which" should be used. For example, There are several other ways in which President Bush can turn the problems he demonstrated in the first debate into assets. Why in which is used here in stead of which alone? Thank you very muchRead More...

Which tense(s) in reported speech?

Hello!!! This time, I want to inquire about the relation between main verb and verb in subordinate clause. That is, I wonder if a main verb limits the scope of verb tenses in a subordinate clause. For example, I think that the following combinations are possible. 1. She said that she loved me. 2. She said that she loves me. 3. She said that she had loved me. 4. She said that she would love me. In the meantime, I wonder if the following combinations are possible or not. 5. She said that she...Read More...

have or had or both ?

Dear All, Please take a look at the following dialogue : A : Have they caught him yet ? B : I've not heard that they HAD. Is 'HAD' correct? Shouldn't it be 'HAVE'? Many thanks. RickyRead More...

sequence of tense

Dear All, Please take a look at the following paragraph : "In my last letter, I mentioned that I had been experiencing considerable pressure. You may have suspected that this was connected to the difficulties which we are having in the publishing department. Sadly, tensions within that department have existed for some time. I've been doing all I can to resolve these but have not been successful . As a result, I resigned as chief editor last month. " Q : As the writer has already resigned...Read More...

With+Object+Complement

I received the following question (actually 2 questions) just now: With the exams ______ tomorrow, you should work harder. Q1: Which of the following can be used here: 1. to hold 2. to be held 3. to be taken 4. to take 5. to give Q2: With the "with+Object+Complement" structure, the complement may be a verb in the infinitive, present participle or past participle. What is the difference between these forms? My answer is as follows: A1: Use "to take". Of the three verbs here, only "take"...Read More...

past perfect tense

Dear All, Please take a look at the following : " We feel the terms of his probation will make up for anything that the jury HAD taken from us." Q : Is the other 'past event'of the past perfect tense = before the judge gave out the terms of the probation ie ".... the jury had taken from us before the judge gave ...terms of the probation." Q : Would the present perfect tense still convey the same meaning ie "... that the jury HAS taken from us." Many thanks. RickyRead More...

important that

Hi, In sentences of the type It + be + "urgency" adjective + that + rest of the noun clause, isn't it necessary to use the subjunctive form? Such as in, "It's important for me that everything be clear". Or is it also equally acceptable to say, "It's important for me that everything is clear". Does it make any difference if we leave out the prepositional phrase "for me"? When a sentence has this introductory "It", inversion of the parts is also possible, so that the noun clause comes first,...Read More...

reveal + reflexive pronoun + infinitive

Hi, I have a doubt about the verb "reveal", concerning the possibility of the structure "reveal" + reflexive pronoun + infinitive. Google searches have confirmed that the occurrence of the structure is widespread. My question is, is it actually good English? For example, would it be okay to say something like, "The illiteracy situation in Brazil is better, the percentage revealing itself to be lower" According to educated usage, 1 - Is the part "revealing itself to be" correct? 2 - Is the...Read More...

relative word "that" with a comma

English Grammar by Betty Azar (p.281) says "When commas are necessary, the pronoun that may not be used (only who, whom, which, whose, where, and when may be used) This is how I had understood relative words, until I saw the following sentence in the September issue of Reader's Digest. Honeybees die because their stings have special barbs, attached to a poison sac, that lodge so firmly in the victim's skin that when the bee flies off, both sing and sac, together with a large part of the...Read More...

"same" as an adjective

In sentence (1) "red" is an adjective. In sentences (2)and (3), is "same" adjective? If so, why does (3) sound wrong without "the" before "same"? (1)I have a red bag. She has a bag too. It is red. (2)She has a bag. It is the same bag ( as she had last night, or as the one I have) (3)I have a bag. She has a bag too. They are same. AppleRead More...

potato chips

I'm wondering why "potato chips" is countable. My take on count and non-count nouns is whether the noun in question still retains its function and characteristic even when broken in small pieces. If yes, it's uncountable. If no, it's countable. A pen is countable and chalk is uncountable in this theory. According to Longman's dictionary of contemporary English, "chip" is a small piece broken off something. To me, potato chips are still potato chips when broken into smaller pieces. I know...Read More...

'Move up'? 'Increased my level'? 'Stepped up'? 'Made progress'?

Hello I'd like to ask how to express in this situation. If move to a higher level B from C, are there some sentences which can be used? 1) I leveled up from C to B. 2) I increased the level from C to B. 3) I stepped up the level from C to B. 4) I improved the level from C to B. 5) I made progress from the level C to B. I'd be glad to have better sentences. Thank you.Read More...
×
×
×
×