All Forum Topics

Inversion and use of auxiliaries -- wrong or highly unusual?

I was wondering whether strange-sounding sentences such as these are grammatically possible. They advised me to stay, and stay I did He was ready to travel, and travel he did The children wanted to eat everything, and eat everything they did Similarly, is it possible to say: They have been suggesting that I give a party, and give a party I will It´s important to practice, and practice she does They emphasized the importance of being punctual, and punctual they were My immediate reaction...Read More...

"All that" or "all what"?

Isn´t it wrong to say something like: I´m in favor of all what he does In this case, wouldn´t we necessarily have to omit "all"? Isn´t the correct form: I´m in favor of all that he does (where the use of "all" is optional) Thanks Gisele São Paulo BrazilRead More...

Possessive adjectives -- nomenclature

I am really riled at the classification of possessive adjectives as pronouns in some circles. And I am writing to you because Longman belongs to these circles. There is a Longman book I just bought at the TESOL conference which compounds the error by calling possessive adjectives pronouns and then setting up some weird categories for these 'pronouns.' The simple answer is the better answer. New categories of pronouns do not need to be invented. The definitions of the parts of speech, which I...Read More...

Fruit

If we want to say a generalization with fruit, can we say, Fruit smells good. It sounds a bit awkward.Read More...

"Lain" or "laid"? Direct object or indirect object?

Which sentence fragmen tis correct: ". . .an argument to which he had lain witness" or ". . .an argument to which he had laid witness"? Why I'm confused: Lay/laid/laid refers the placement of a (material) object (such as a book) while lie/lay/lain refers to the reclining of one's self. Since there is reference to "he," it seems as though the word choice should be "lain," especially since there is no placement of a (material) object. MS Word's "grammar" doesn't agree with this reasoning and...Read More...

Special adjective clause - some of whom are / some of whom being

We often come across sentences like: They have invited lots of guests, some of whom are specialists The chidren, all of whom had played the whole day long, were quite exhausted It´s imperative that we go over the main points, a few of which are still not clear The products, several of which have been recently launched, seem to be well accepted Celso Charure, all of whose teachings revolved around developing one´s awareness as fully as possible, was an exceptional man It seems to me that...Read More...

There is or There are

According to the following sentences: [S1] Like having more than one way to meet someone in real life,there is more than one way to meet someone in cyberspace. [S2] There are more than one way of recovering from an economic downturn. These sentences are selected from google.com. The question is whether we should use "there is" or "there are" for such a phrase as ...more than one way...Read More...

What´s shaking

What would be some appropriate responses to: What´s shaking? What´s up? How do you do? Thanks Gisele São Paulo BrazilRead More...

Verb "to have"

Is it correct to say "I don´t have" instead of "I haven´t got" ?Read More...

As well as

Can we put the phrase 'as well as' at the beginning of a sentence? Is the following sentence correct? As well as making the corridors smelly,this also attracts cockroaches and even rats.Read More...

Impressed AT?

Can "impressed" be used with a preposition "at" as used in this sentence? though impressed at the company's incredible winning streak through such acts as Britney Spears, R. Kelly, Nsync, The Backstreet Boys and Joe. PromegaXRead More...

Verb forms in questions

Why is it that sometimes helping verbs are necessary in forming questions and sometimes they are not? example - "who visited you?" vs. "who did you visit?"Read More...

The noun "curiosity"

I read something today which I thought would be considered grammatically wrong in standard textbook English, but I wasn´t totally sure. It was a sentence where the noun "curiosity" was followed by the preposition "of", followed by a gerund; something like: "He no longer has the curiosity of reading tourist guides". I´m aware that one can be "curious about something" or "curious to do something" or there may be "curiosity about something" but is it normal to say "have the curiosity of doing...Read More...

"Was being"

Hallo, It`s greenrat again. I`ve got a question to ask. When do we say "He was being unfair / He was being funny"? What is "being unfair"? Gerund or participle? And what do we need that structure for? Is it past continuous or not? I mean why would we use it instead of simple past like "he was unfair"? Thank u / wish u all the best yuri greenrat@yandex.ruRead More...

Regret doing == regret having done?

S1 I regret having called him a thief, but I regret even more his stealing my watch. S2 I regret calling him thief, but I regret even more his having stolen my watch. S1 comes from the Longman Contemporary English-Chinese Dictionary (1988:1186), an English dictionary with Chinese translation. S2 is my imitation of it. Do S1 and S2 have the same meaning? (I think they mean the same because, in these sentences, what one regrets is something that has already taken place.) Thank you.Read More...

"Who is..." or "who are..."

When you ask, "Who is coming to your party?" but you know there will be many people, why do we use "who is" rather than "who are"? There must be a simple answer to this, but I can't seem to come up with it. Thanks for your help, Lois Bascom loisbascom@schooloflanguage.comRead More...

Phrasal verb: "put up with "

I am attending an Applied Linguistics class this spring at the School for International Training (SIT). This week we've been engaged in a lively debate about a particular phrasal verb. Here goes... "put up with" Is it a verb + particle + particle or verb + particle + preposition? We've been using "The Grammar Book" by Marianne Celce-Murcia and Diane Larsen-Freeman as our main resource. Our instructor has encouraged us to explore other avenues of enlightenment outside of our text. We hope you...Read More...

Modals and simple pres/past with expressions of urgency

Originally posted March 28, 2003 11:10 PM I found in a corpus that in "suggestion-that clauses ""must","could","might" can also be used. e.g. ...suggestion that she ought to have a man to knock round and look... ...suggestion that it would seem more natural for her to summon Sophy Viner... It is the same case with "essential that" clauses: ...suggestion that any one are... her could be sick.... ... a Reference Number will be given and it is essential that this number is written in the space...Read More...

Special meaning of "though"???

Needless to say, word soon spread about Nivea in A&R offices across the country. Both manager and artist had their sights set on Jive Records, though impressed at the company's incredible winning streak through such acts as Britney Spears, R. Kelly, Nsync, The Backstreet Boys and Joe. The above sentence is an excerpt from an article about Nivea Hamilton. You can see the whole article at http://www.hiponline.com/artist/music/n/nivea/ I have 2 questions about this sentence. 1. What does...Read More...

"The third" or "a third"?

We usually use "the" with ordinal numbers. But sometimes "a/an" is used with them such as "a third" and so on. What is the difference between "the third" and "a third" ? Thank you. KenRead More...

"Whole nother"

This may not actually be a "grammar" question, but it's an interesting phenomenon: Why do we often say "a whole nother" instead of "another whole," as in, "The piece of cake was so good, I ate a whole nother one"? Susan sgzamora@hotmail.comRead More...
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