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Dear/dearly father

could i say, (a) They gave a present to their dear / dearly /lovely father.Read More...
True that "lovely mother" appears six times more frequently than "lovely father" on Google, but I have no problem with describing a mature, nice man as "a lovely man." "Dearly" is an adverb and would modify an adjective, as in the expressions: dearly beloved my dearly beloved father RachelRead More...

decorate with

could i say, (a) They decorated (with) the tree for the Christmas day / Christmas. (b) They decorated the tree with stars / some ornaments / some decoration for Christmas. Which preposition is suitable for "decorate"?Read More...
Yes, "some decorations" would be the usual way to say this sentence. You can say "Christmas Day" is you are referring to one day. "Christmas" often refers to Christmas Day itself, plus several days before and after that day, or "the Christmas season." FRead More...

went through / over the window

could i say, (a) The burglar went through the window. (b) The burglar is through (into) the window. (c) The burglar through the window to come inside the house. (d) The burglar through into the window /house. (e) The burglar goes into the house through the window. (f) The burglar opened the window and through into the house. (g) The burglar went into/to the house through the window. (h) The burglar is climbing / climbs (up)/(over) through the window /house. (i) The burglar climbs into the...Read More...
(a) The burglar went through the window. YES. (b) The burglar is through (into) the window. NO. (c) The burglar through the window to come inside the house. NO. (d) The burglar through into the window /house. NO. (e) The burglar goes into the house through the window. YES. (f) The burglar opened the window and through into the house. NO (g) The burglar went into/to the house through the window. INTO THE HOUSE (h) The burglar is climbing / climbs (up)/(over) through the window /house. CLIMBS...Read More...

Higher education vs higher learning

Is institutions of higher education the same as institutions of higher learning ? Or does higher education mean the same as higher learning ? Google shows that higher education outnumbers higher learning . Answers says that higher learning is a synonym of higher education , but it gives them different definitions. Thanks.Read More...
The two terms seem to be slightly different, with "higher learning" often, but not always, referring to more than just studying. Here are definitions from three dictionaries, in pairs, so that you may see how they differ. 1. MSN Encarta World Dictionary: http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/Dicti...spx?refid=1861617878 higher learning high·er learn·ing noun Definition: advanced study : education or study at college or university level...Read More...

saver

How do i say, if someone who always help you when you are in troubles. He/She will appear in front of you to help you in need. This kind of person is called____________.Read More...
Yes. Another possibility is "guardian angel."Read More...

crawl

could i say, (a) The dog is crawling into the hole of / in the fence. (b) The dog is crawling through the hole in /of the fence. (c) The dog is crawling through/in the fence. (d) The dog is crawling into the fence. (e) The dog is crawling the fence / fence hole. (f) The dog is crawling the hole of / in the fence. (g) The dog is crawling out of the hole of / in the fence.Read More...
(a) Not OK, use b: (b) The dog is crawling through the hole in the fence. (c) The dog is crawling through the fence. (d) Not OK. (e) Not OK. (f) Not OK. (e) The dog is crawling out of the hole in the fence.Read More...

all's well that ends well

Hello teachers, What is the meaning of All's well that ends well. a) If all (everything) is well, that ends well. or b) If something ends well, all that happened before was well. Thank you. PrashobhiniRead More...
all's well that ends well Everything has turned out satisfactorily, even though the outcome has been uncertain. For example, His lawyer persuaded Jack to plead guilty, but the court merely put him on probation--all's well that ends well. This proverb, dating from about 1250, gained even more currency as the title of a Shakespeare comedy.Read More...

united --> 'be' + past participle of an intransitive verb

I saw this in a poster on TV. United we stand. Is "stand" a copular verb? And is "united" modifed "we"? Thank youRead More...
First, let's look at "is arrived AT," which is different from "is arrived." "Is arrived AT" means "is reached." You might say that an agreement has been arrived AT (reached), for example, or that a conclusion has been arrived AT. "Arrive at" can be in the passive only when the preposition is part of an idiom, not when it is part of a place. We can't say, "The station was arrived at," but we can say "a conclusion was arrived at."* The New York Times Archive (all the articles since 1981) has...Read More...

crash into / on / against / at / through

could i say, (A) The car crashes into / on / against / at / through / in the tree.Read More...
It's not impossible, but it's rare. "Junction" needs to be identified. Google examples: I WAS rather concerned on reading the inquest report (LET, May 23) on the death of two young men after a car crashed at the junction of Shear Bank Road and ... archive.thisislancashire.co.uk/2002/6/1/ (1 example) During the struggle the patrol car crashed at the intersection of Town Street and Front Street. Patrolman Schneider was ejected from car during the accident ... www.odmp.org/officer.php?oid=11872...Read More...

cross/ across

Which way should I say this sentence? He helps tht blind cross/across the road. What are the differences between these words?Read More...
These sentences are both correct. "He helps the blind CROSS the road" has a causative construction. A few verbs like "help" (others are "let" and "make") take an object – in this case "the blind" – and then a second verb, which is "cross" in this sentence. This second verb appears with these verbs in the simple form, like "cross" here. "Help" is special because you could also say, "He helps the blind TO CROSS the road" with the same meaning. "He helps the blind ACROSS the road" has "across"...Read More...

to be / for being / becomes

Which are correct? (a) He is proud to be / for being Malaysians. (b) He is proud to become / becomes Malaysians. (c) They feel proud as a Malaysian. (d) They feel proud as becomes / becoming Malaysian.Read More...
a) He is proud to be / for being Malaysians. (b) He is proud to become / becomes Malaysians. (c) They feel proud as a Malaysian. (d) They feel proud as becomes / becoming _________________ The adjective "proud" can be followed by the infinitive form (to be) or the preposition "of" + a noun or a gerund. So: (a) He is proud to be Malaysian. He is proud of being Malaysian. (b) He is proud to become Malaysian. He is proud of becoming Malaysian. (d) They feel proud to become Malaysians. They feel...Read More...

around the neck

vincent Teo Member Posted June 29, 2006 01:22 AM could i say, (a) He wears a chain on /around /in/ at his neck. (b) He wears a gold ring in / on/ at his finger.Read More...
Why? I don't understand.Read More...

Had - Tag Question

We had tea, hadn't we? / didn't we? Are both answers OK? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Interesting! "Had you a good time" does indeed appear in Scottish English as in these examples on Google: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22had+you+a+good+time%22 Bear in mind, though, that this is specialized, localized English, with only 11 examples on Google. "Did you have a good time" appears in 132,000 examples. RRead More...

see the light

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that SEE THE LIGHT shares only one meaning in common with SEE THE LIGHT OF DAY: SEE THE LIGHT – 1. (of a book, etc.) be published: Christopher Isherwood's diaries are now at last to see the light. 2. realize one's mistakes; reach a full understanding: He was waiting for me to beg him to forgive me and tell him that I had seen the light. 3. start to believe that a difficult or unpleasant part of a situation is finally over: Your company is professional...Read More...
But, "see the light" also means to become enlightened, not just to feel relief. From Oxford Idioms*: "See the light" – 1. Understand or accept something after you have spent a lot of time thinking about it. I think he's finally seen the light and is going to retired while he's still able to enjoy himself. 2- Change what you believe as a result of a religious experience. She was an atheist but now she has seen the light. "See the light at the end of the tunnel" is somewhat different. Rachel...Read More...

that the main theme is/that is the main theme

The assassination of the leader that the main theme is, is in his new movie. The assassination of the leader that is the main theme, is in his new movie. Are they OK? Thank youRead More...
Let's break down the sentence into two independent clauses before joining them into one sentence. Actually, after re-examining your sentences, I do believe that both would be better using "which" in non-restrictive clauses. This means that the information in the dependent clause (the adjective clause), is extra. The meaning of the noun phrase that it modifies (the assassination of the leader) can stand alone in the sentence, and the fact that the main theme is about it is additional...Read More...

'Virgin of the Rocks'

The 'Virgin of the Rocks' is the name of a famous painting. Why is the preposition 'of' used? Why not (say) 'on'?Read More...
One use of "of" is to indicate belonging to. The Collins COBUILD has this as one definition at the entry for "of": You use of after the name of someone of something to introduce the institution or place they belong to or are connected with... The Prince of Wales....the Finance Minister of Bangladesh...the superb rock-hewn Cave Temples of Badami. _______ This use of "of" in the title of the painting refers to the subject's belonging to the rocks. It is not meant to be a physical description...Read More...

working bee

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that WORKER BEE cannot replace WORKING BEE in the following context: Are you able to assist at our working bee on Sunday 23rd April at 8:00am? The purpose of this working bee is to beautify the area for Big Night Out. Thank you, YuriRead More...
A "worker bee," literally, is a female bee that does the basic work in a bee colony. When "worker bee" refers to a person, it refers to one who does the basic work, without glory or chance of renown. A "working bee" is an event at which people work towards a common cause. It's a "bee" in which everyone works. Examples from Google, plus a site to click on with pictures of a working bee: "¢ Regular working bees are held at the reserve and further information on the program can be obtained from...Read More...

is / was

Hello teachers, 1. Roald Dahl WAS a famous writer. 2. Agatha Christie WAS known as the Queen of Crime. Can I use ˜IS' instead of ˜WAS' in the above sentences since Roald Dahl is still famous and Agatha Christie is still known as the Queen of Crime ? Thank you. PrashobhiniRead More...
Roald Dahl died in 1990, so "was" is the correct tense to describe him as a famous writer, even though he is still famous. Here, the verb "be" refers to his existence, which occurred in the past. You could say, though, that "Roald Dahl is remembered / considered / known as one of the best children's writers of the century." _______ If you say that Agatha Christie IS a famous writer, it would not be correct because she is not alive. However, since she is still known as the Queen of Crime (I'm...Read More...

"Others" or "the others"? (Terry)

Terry Junior Member Posted July 05, 2006 09:15 AM I would like to know the difference between "others" and "the others". I have read the Azar Grammar book. However, I am not too sure about the difference. For example: Mr A sent an email to me and other persons, say, Mr B, Mr C and Mr D. When I reply to Mr A's email, which one of the following examples is correct. (1) Dear Mr A and others (2) Dear Mr A and the others Many thanks Posts: 1 | Registered: July 05, 2006Read More...
Some possibilities: Dear Mr. A and members of the team: Dear Mr. A and members of the group: Dear Mr. A and committee members: Dr. Mr. A and others: RRead More...

walks/ crawls / moves

could i say, (a) The tortoise walks/ crawls / moves / is walking slowly.Read More...
It's possible to use "walk" with "turtle"; it's not incorrect. However,"move" is the verb that comes up most frequently with "turtle" on Google. The idea of "walking" does not seem to go with "turtle," although using its legs, it does walk. RRead More...

change / become / turn into -- the same?

Which of these are correct? (a) The caterpillar changes into / to a butterfly. (b) The caterpillar turns into / to a butterfly. (c) The caterpillar becomes into / to a butterfly. (D) The caterpillar changes to become a butterfly. (e) The caterpillar becomes a butterfly. (f) The caterpillar grows into / to a butterfly. (g) The caterpillar grows up into / to a butterfly. (h) The caterpillar grows up to become a butterfly.Read More...
I have made the sentences above correct, or, if not possible, written NO. RRead More...

"would"

Hi teachers, 1. What is the meaning of ˜WOULD' in the following sentence? I WOULD speak with you. Thank you. AnanyaRead More...
I would speak with you indicates, as Marilyn mentions, the old volitional "would," and should not be confused with the conditional "would" which shows up in sentences such as: Should you come here, I would be able to speak to/with you/I would like to speak to you.Read More...

Which idiom?

Dear Rachel & Marilyn, What is the correct way to finish this sentence? Opening a new branch to the bank is not an easy thing ; there will be a lot of ..... give and take by and large give or take now and again Thank you very much SayedRead More...
It seems you're right, Rachel. Those examples seem fine to me.Read More...

success

Success is that how much money you make. Is this sentence OK? I have the adjective clause modifies the subject. Thank you very much!Read More...
Success is how much money you make. You could also say, "How much money you make is success." A noun clause often begins with a question word, including the wh-words and "how." A paraphrase would be "Success is this / this thing." Then you can see that the pronoun "this" or the noun phrase "this thing" has the same function – that of a noun -- as "how much money you make." This pronoun or noun function can also be held by a noun clause. You could say: Success is... what you earn. how well...Read More...
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