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There

ahmad
Hello, everyone, I think something is terribly wrong with the following sentences, but I can't explain the same to myself. Would someone kindly help me with that? 1. ABC is a scenic place. You should visit to there. 2. ABC is a scenic place. You should visit there. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Ahmad, In that position, "there" is an adverb of place. "visit" is a transitive verb and, as such, requires a noun or a pronoun as a direct object. Therefore, you should say: 3. ... You should visit it.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

ASK FOR more / much / many / most

Which is correct? John has already put in his best effort. I really cannot ask for more / much / many / most. ThanksRead More...
Hi, bear_bear, In the absence of further context, the best answer is "more." All you could ask for is for John to put in his best effort, and that is what he did. You really cannot ask for more.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Which sentence is grammatically correct about personality?

I have made up a few similar sentences below. (1) John can sense your personality easily. (2) John can sense the personality you have easily. (3) John can sense the type of personality you have easily. All of my non-native English speaking friends think none of my sentences are correct. What is your opinion? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, I see nothing wrong with (1), which I think is preferable because "easily" will unmistakably refer to "sense" rather than to "have" (even though one cannot have a personality easily, since "have" is a stative verb to which "easily" will not apply).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

exists in one copy or only one copy exists

I have made up two similar sentences below. (1) Only one copy of the stamp exists in the world. (2) The stamp exists in only one copy in the world. I am not sure which one is grammatical. Please help me. Thanks a lo.tRead More...
Hi, Ansonman, Only (1) is correct. However, one would normally say: (3) There is only one copy of the stamp in the world. For the phrase "in X number of copies/versions, etc." to be possible, there needs to be some adjective or participle after the verb "be": (4) The book is only available in hardcover edition. (5) The agreement will be signed in three copies/counterparts.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

and or

Hello, Do the following two sentences both mean that Kent can speak neither English nor French? Or is one of them incorrect? 1. Kent cannot speak English and French. 2. Kent cannot speak English or French. Does sentence 2 mean that Kent can speak either one, English or French? AppleRead More...
Ah,,,thank you, David. I got it. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

extremely precise device

Are all of these sentences correct and correctly punctuated: 1) This is a device that is extremely precise for people in the medical field. 2) This is an extremely precise device for people in the medical field. 3) This is a device that is extremely precise, for people in the medical field. 4) This is an extremely precise device, for people in the medical field. =========================================== 5) This is a device that is extremely expensive for people in the medical field. 6)...Read More...
Thank you very much, Gustavo, I have been thinking about this some more. I don't think '5' is really ambiguous. If something is expensive for me, that means it will be difficult for me to afford it. But maybe one might argue that there is a different meaning in which 'for' would simply mean 'according to'. Not sure. One could argue that if it is hard for me to afford something, I'd consider that thing expensive. I thought '6' could mean: a) This is an extremely expensive device and it has...Read More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

have asked for a long time

My non-native English speaking friend made up a sentence and asked me if it was correct. I have written it down below. (1) People have asked me for a long time how to make ice cream at home. It sounds OK to me. Does it make sense to say "ask for a long time"? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, To express the duration indicated by "for a long time," I think the present perfect continuous would sound much better: (2) People have been asking me for a long time how to make ice cream at home. Instead of "for a long time," some other adverbs could be used, like "repeatedly" or "once and over again," which I believe are in fact more appropriate, since they express recurrence rather than continuity.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

my memory of .... or a memory of ...

I have made up two pairs of similar sentences below. (1a) My old shoes brought back my memory of the time someone stole my watch. (1b) My old shoes brought back a memory of the time someone stole my watch. (2a) The song brought back my memory of my dad who passed away ten years ago. (2b) The song brought back a memory of my dad who passed away ten years ago. If I am talking about one specific incident, do I use "my memory" or "a memory"? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, The phrase is "bring back memori es " (in the plural). If the speaker needs to make clear that those memories came back to him/her rather than to an unidentified person or group of people, then an object pronoun rather than a possessive determiner should be used: 1c) My old shoes brought me back memories of the time someone stole/had stolen my watch. (Note: I find it hard to see the connection between the shoes and the watch, but it's just a narrative detail.) Actually, I'd...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

sorer v. more sore

Hi All, Which is correct "sorer" or "more sore"? Since sorer is an actual word, I'm thinking it is correct and would be in any case and that I would not want to use "more" whatever. Thanks for your help! I joined not too long ago and it's my first time posting. I usually always find the answer here!Read More...
Thank you, Mr. Moderator I appreciate the help!Read More...
Last Reply By This Lisa Lee · First Unread Post

could vs can

In one episode of Seinfeld, Jerry is sitting there on a plane and the plane is running. He looks out of the window and sees Kramer is running after the plane. But in a second Kramer is out of sight. Jerry sits straight and says to himself, "Couldn't be." My question is, why doesn't he say "can't be" instead? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, Let me begin by saying that I've never watched Seinfeld . "Can't be" would have made sense if Kramer was still in sight when Jerry made the statement to himself. Compare: That can't be him/he. You have asked about truncated, elliptical sentences. If we were use a complete sentence, the one that I would use is this: That couldn't have been him/he.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I'm seriously stuck

I have been giving questions and I am completely stuck. Can someone help. I have to think of two similar items to the words below: I've, Won't, He's, on, toward, with, gone, stolen, seen, fast, hopefully, actually, must, should, may, Then this is my next question. Correct the student error by writing the corrected sentence in the first box. In the second box explain, as simply as possible, why we use the corrected version My bike stole last week. Please put your luggages over here. My sister...Read More...
I appreciate your effort, but it was not good enough. This is a site for discussing specific grammar questions. Each thread is devoted to one general topic. The title of the thread should reflect that topic, even if it is only a phrase from one of the examples. Never use completely generic titles like "grammar," "help," "I'm stuck." And never present a list of homework exercises for us to complete. The Grammar Exchange is not a homework completion service. If you wish to ask about more than...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammer 3

How would you explain to a learner of English the difference in meaning between the following pairs of words? Spain : Spanish 2. wise : intelligent walk : stroll see something through : see through something then : than I really need the help.Read More...
Again, you need to learn how to ask questions properly at this website.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammer 2

Then this is my next question. Correct the student error by writing the corrected sentence in the first box. In the second box explain, as simply as possible, why we use the corrected version My bike stole last week. Please put your luggages over here. My sister is more tall than Oliver. I used to go and see my parents last weekend. I wish you stop playing the loud music.Read More...
Please do not present us with a set of school exercises to complete for you. We don't do students' homework for them. If you are struggling with how to answer one of the questions, try to understand what perplexes you about the grammar. Then ask a focused question, and try to give the thread a meaningful title. Never use completely generic titles like "Grammar," "Help," "I'm stuck." Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

what you are going to give up

Tell us what are you going to give up or Tell us what you are going to give upRead More...
Hello, Paviaandres, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! You haven't asked a question, but I assume you mean to ask which of those two sentences is correct. With the punctuation as you have it, neither is correct, since neither ends with a period. If you added a period at the end of each sentence, then only the second sentence would be correct. Tell us what you are going to give up. "What you are going to give up" is an embedded question functioning as the object (one of the objects) of the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Which/Whom

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Some ten men visited the family, out of whom three stayed over. Some ten men visited the family, out of which three stayed over. Which one of the two sentences is correct (even in terms of punctuation)? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ahmad, While (1) is better than (2), I find neither sentence to be good, mainly because of "out of." And while you can say "of whom three," I would prefer "three of whom": (1a) Some ten men visited the family, three of whom stayed over. You may be concerned about the fact that the relative clause comes at the end of the sentence rather than after "men." That's OK. It has been "extraposed." If you still don't like it, you could use a fancy absolute construction instead: (3) Some ten...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the difference between like to do and like doing

Hi, What's the difference between "I Like to read" and "I like reading"? Thanks.Read More...
Hi David Thank you very much for your very clear explanation. According to my grammar book, there is difference in meaning between "I don't like to V" and "I don't like V-ing, for example, I don't like to go. (It means I won't go because I don't like to go) I don't like going. (It means I still have to go even if I don't like to go) Could you please give your opinion on that? Many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By kuen · First Unread Post

take a rest a few times or take a few rests

I have made up two examples below. (1) Along the way home, I took a few rests because I was tired. (2) Along the way home, I took a rest a few times because I was tired. Which one is correct? Please help me. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Although "rest" is defined as countable and uncountable, its countable variant is largely restricted to the use of the article "a." We don't usually come across the plural "rests." Instead, we prefer "some periods of rest." More specific measures of time can also be used, in which case the genitive can be used: - three hours(') rest - two weeks(') rest - five minutes(') restRead More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

‘US assets will need to get cheap enough or offer high enough yields to keep foreigners willing holders and accumulators of US assets.’

Hi! Could I ask a question about this sentence from Oxford Dictionary of English ? "US assets will need to get cheap enough or offer high enough yields to keep foreigners willing holders and accumulators of US assets." I was wondering what the structure of the sequence "need to get cheap enough or offer high enough yields" would be like. It seems to me that the sentence can be paraphrased like this: (1) US assets will need to get cheap enough yields or offer high enough yields to keep ...Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo and David! It's interesting that the "keep+noun+noun" pattern is less preferable though it is a grammatically available option. I have no idea why, but maybe that's the way it sounds!Read More...
Last Reply By yasukotta · First Unread Post

"You have our support, whatever you decide"

Hi everyone, I came across this saying "You have our support, whatever you decide." In the oxford advanced learners dictionary when looking up the word whatever. Could somebody please advise what function is being performed by "whatever you decide".... Many thanksRead More...
Hello, Philip, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The word "whatever" can play different roles within the sentence. In this case, it introduces an adverbial clause of concession. Within the adverbial clause, "whatever" is, at the same time, the linking word and the direct object of the verb "decide." This can be more easily understood if we break it down into "no matter what," where "no matter" is the concessive linker and "what" is the direct object of the verb "decide": - You have our...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

He saw enough to satisfy and interest him

Hi! When I was reading Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, I noticed this sentence interesting: Laurie did not read all this while he watched her feed the peacocks, but he saw enough to satisfy and interest him, ... (Chapter 37) I thought "him" should be replaced with "himself," and I was wondering whether the following sentences are grammatically okay and whether there could be any difference in meaning among (1) and (2), (3) and (4), and (5) and 6): (1) He saw enough to satisfy and interest...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo, Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts! It's interesting to see that the adjective enough phrase can not only follow but also precede the noun it modifies (there might be some restriction on its preceding the noun, I don't know) on one hand, and they can differ when it comes to the presence/absence of the (for sb) to do sth infinitival clause on the other hand.Read More...
Last Reply By yasukotta · First Unread Post
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