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doubts

1) I doubted the science fiction story I had written. Does that sentence make sense? The idea is that I had doubts about it; I didn't know if it was good or not. I doubted its value. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, Gustavo, Yes, I agree.Read More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

than

Could you explain the meaning of "any more than" in the sentence below? I could not understand the meaning of the sentence while it joins the later clause after "than". "As we are experiencing firsthand, you cannot fight the pandemic with lies and disinformation any more than you can fight it with hate or incitement to hatred," Merkel said.Read More...
So deepRead More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

Since

There are many new houses belonging to the low income employees. They have been built at a high cost since 4 years ago. To me, "since 4 years ago" is not an acceptable combination. What do you think?Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, This question has been discussed many times on this forum, and I remember sharing in one of its discussions. See here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../topic/since-and-ago BTW, this question reminds me of a sentence written by DOC V in one of his emails. He wrote to me, "We (David and DOC V) have been good friends since years before the Grammar Exchange even existed." Although it is rare to use, it seems that native speakers use it spontaneously.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

A photo opportunity

What is the relationship between the statement before and after "a photo opportunity that"? He is also expected to be photographed wearing it, a photo opportunity that some of the President's aides practically begged him to agree to and hope will encourage skeptical Trump supporters to do the same.Read More...
Hi, Joshua, The original text speaks about the possibility of Trump wearing a mask. The appositive phrase "a photo opportunity ..." refers to that possibility.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Can "hear" come in progressive?

ceedhanna
While he ………… his young brother, he felt something wrong in his speech. was hearing hears is hearing heard This sentence was discussed in an Egyptian Facebook group for English Teachers. Their opinions were like that: Some answered (heard) Some answered (was hearing) Those who answered (heard) justify their answer that (hear) cannot be in progressive. But the second group provided a proof: I thought I was hearing things. (Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English) That was the music that...Read More...
Hi, Ceedhanna, It is well-known that 'hear' isn't usually used in the progressive form. So, when can it be used in the progressive? A Practical English Grammar says that 'hear' can be used in the progressive when it means 'listen formally to' (complaints / evidence etc.). - The court is hearing evidence this afternoon. The book adds that 'hear' meaning 'receive news or letters' can also be used in the progressive form but only in the present perfect and future : - I've been hearing all about...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

sales equals income

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 82. "Millionaires are always open to learning better ways to run their businesses. Millionaires understand that sales equals income but massive income equals having a team built on the foundation of trust." Does (sales) in the context above mean (items bought and sold)? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

early (on) in life.

We should adopt a healthy lifestyle early (on) in life. How does the sentence above change in meaning with and without "on"? What is the function of the "on" in terms of meaning? AppleRead More...
That is ambiguous, because "early in life" can refer to "knew" or to "wanted to do," although the former is more likely as it is usual that at a young age we discover what we want to be as adults (that is, if "wanted to do" refers to one's future projects rather than to one's current likes). In reply to your question, it is unclear whether she still knows or has forgotten. Perhaps we can reinforce the ongoing knowledge by using "already": - Early in life she already knew what she wanted to do.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

mind block...

Hi Anyone, and Everyone also, My name is Tyler, and I have a quick question, I'm writing something at the moment and I'm stuck with one word to finish a sentence, The sentence is intended as humourous, and the content is to appear... well... ...grammatically correct. I didn't know this forum existed 10 minutes ago so before I write more let me know if this is even the place to ask please. That is, if anyone is around at this time?Read More...
No, "portmanteau" is a method of word formation consisting of combining two words to form a new one : breakfast + lunch = brunch. My advice is that you follow David's definition as to CluBnaim and Altern8 being unconventional or, perhaps, exotic spellings .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

First time here and grateful for any help that can be provided. Are all the following sentences correct: I would be very sad if roses were the only flower. [That is, if roses were the only kind of flower.] I would be very sad if roses were the only flowers. [That is, if roses were the only flowers that could be found in nature.] Similarly, What if robins were the only bird? [That is, what if robins were the only kind of bird?] What if robins were the only birds? [That is, what if robins were...Read More...
Understood. I may rely on using some "poetic license" in the end as long as I'm making a valid point and not being grammatically incorrect My thanks again for your answers.Read More...
Last Reply By AG · First Unread Post

Don't like anyone calling me names/ to call e names.

I think both of these expressions are grammatically correct I just wan to know which one's more natural: 1) I don't like anyone calling me names/ I don't like anyone to call me names. 2) I don't like driving too fast/ I don't like to drive too fast.Read More...
I'm sorry I wasn't clear with my question. I meant this part: In (1), however, I find "I don't like anyone calling me names" to be more natural than "I don't like anyone to call me names." Instead of the second formulation, I would use the passive: " I don't like to be called names by anyone ." You said that you find "I don't like anyone calling me names" more natural. So I though that it might be a goo idea to stick to this construction.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

in the last five minutes/days/ years.

Are all the following sentences correct: 1) I haven't seen him in the last five minutes. 2) I haven't heard from her in the last five years. Is 'didn't' in place of 'haven't' possible? As far as I know it's incorrect to say "I didn't see him in the last five minutes" since last five minutes is connecting the the past to the present.Read More...
Thank you very much for the answer. Specially for the example sentences.Read More...
Last Reply By Ashraful Haque · First Unread Post

a car that was stolen

1) They hospitalized a man who got into a fight with a nurse. Can we tell if the man got into a fight with a nurse before being hospitalized or after? 2) They might have captured a tiger that escaped. Can we tell if the tiger had escaped before being captured or after? 3) Maybe he bought a car that was stolen. 4) He might have bought a car that was stolen. Can we be sure that the car wasn't stolen after he bought it? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hi, Navi, The more natural interpretation is that the man was hospitalized as a result of his fight with a nurse. Otherwise, you should say "... who then got into a fight ..." I would say: They might have captured a tiger that had escaped. The car was stolen before he bought it. Only thus does the probability of having bought such a car make sense. I don't think it makes much sense to say that it is probable that he bought a car that was stolen afterwards.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Fit as an adj

The trousers you bought for me ( don't fit - aren't fit) Though fit is an adj but when I looked it up in some dictionaries, l found it is not used for size but it has other meanings like healthy, suitable to do something, so I think in the previous sentence we must choose ( don't ) only. What do you think?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed towab, "fit" is also a verb, meaning "be the right size (for sb)," so the correct option is: - The trousers you bought (for) me don't fit (me) . The adjective "fit" would be possible if there were a for- phrase or a to- infinitive: - The trousers you bought (for) me aren't fit for me . - The trousers you bought (for) me aren't fit for a party . - The trousers you bought (for) me aren't fit to go to work .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Defeat

Which sentences are considered correct? 1 If the lion and the bull fought each other, they both would defeat and hurt themselves. 2 If the lion and the bull fought each other, they both would defeat. 3 If the lion and the bull fought each other, both of them would defeat and hurt. 4 If the lion and the bull fought each other, they would being defeated and hurt among themselves. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, Only (1) is grammatically correct, because "defeat" and "hurt" are transitive and require an object. I prefer: 1'. If the lion and the bull fought each other, they would both defeat and hurt themselves. However, from a semantic point of view, you cannot defeat yourself. You can defeat others, not yourself, so -- though grammatical -- that sentence does not make sense. Even "defeating each other" would be nonsensical. (2) and (3) do not work because the verbs "defeat" and...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Prepositions - In, To, From

Which is correct? Save the template to the "Monthly" folder or Save the template in the "Monthly" folder. Open the "June" folder from the "Monthly Review" SharePoint site. or Open the "June" folder in the "Monthly Review" SharePoint site. Select "approved" in the "Status" drop-down list. or Select "approved" from the "Status" drop-down list.Read More...
Hi, GatsbyinEnglish, I think all of those prepositions work well. "to" and "from" imply movement, while "in" does not. Finally, I prefer "on" with "list."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Verb question?

An ESL friend is asking me why the sentence, "The temperature can become close to 40 degrees Celsius here" is incorrect. The answer is " be " and I also think " get " works, but I'm not sure how to explain why become is wrong. Is it wrong? If so, why?Read More...
Hi, akcpenguin, Although "get" and "become" are both verbs of process, "get" is also verb of movement which enables it to work with adverbs of place ( get close, get near ) -- which is not the case with "become." Notice that if "close to" is not there, neither "get" nor "become" works : * The temperature can become 40 degrees Celsius here. * The temperature can get 40 degrees Celsius here. We can only use be , or reach , or get to (as explained above): - The temperature can reach 40 degrees...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I just asked casually

Does "I just asked casually" mean asking someone something without any intention ? If it does, what are some other ways of saying it?Read More...

I offered up a quick thanks for God’s protection in our lives?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, PP 74-75 "My wife and I were at a conference in Char- lotte, North Carolina. It was about 11:30 p.m., our meeting had ended, and we were hungry. We drove around and found a Domino’s Pizza par- lor in a small strip mall. I went in to order our pizza and came back out into the parking lot to wait for it. I was standing next to our car, my wife was in the car with the door open, and we were listening to...Read More...
crystal clear! Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Learn / learn on

Are they in same meaning? 1 I want to learn on how to increase my savings. 2 I want to learn how to increase my savings. ThanksRead More...
Sentence (1) is incorrect, bear_bear. You can use (2), or you can say: I want to learn about how to increase my savings. I wanted information on how to increase my savings.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

winning?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 82. "The power of a code of honor is only effective if people are questioned when they violate it. What good is a code if you are not going to enforce it? When building a team, everyone must be willing to accept correction from other team members. If team members get angry or offended when corrected, then they must change their attitude or leave the team. Anger has no place in a winning team. Anger...Read More...
Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Promote?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 85 "If you currently have one source of income and want to start another source, then make sure the new source of income supports the first, and make sure the first source can support the new one. Do they help promote each other? Can your primary source of income do business with your secondary or third ? Do they lend credibility to each other? Can the customers from your primary source also become...Read More...
Crystal clear. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

what do we call changing a sentence from negative to positive?

Changed negative beginning from: "The less you wear a mask, the healthier you will be." To the positive beginning: "The more you wear a mask, the less healthy you will be" Does that type of switch have a name? - Positivization? And is "you" or "anyone" intrinsically better? Thanks!Read More...
Hello, Steven, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I'm not sure that this issue is dealt with by grammar. Impersonal "you" is much better than "anyone." Alternatively, we could use "we."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post
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