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Inform/Informed

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Are the following sentences grammatically correct? 1. This is once again to inform all the candidates who have applied for the post of the principal in this college to report for the interview on the scheduled date and time, as notified earlier, failing which they will forego their right for consideration. 2. All the candidates who have applied for the post of the principal in this college are hereby once again informed to report for the interview on the scheduled date and...Read More...
Hi, David, I am sincerely thankful to you for having pointed out, and subsequently rendered correct, so many mistakes in the maiden post of this thread, which I had overlooked miserably. Your helpful responses, and Gustavo's insights, are more than what I had hoped to get out of this thread. Your observation in your last paragraph is something I failed to foresee, as I was more interested to see if 'This is once again to inform' part, which was provoked by an earlier thread, had the...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Any Error?

(a)HAVING a membership to a health club has helped me (b) TO LOSE weight, increase my (c) OVERALL fitness level, and (d) INTRODUCED me to new friends. (e) No error. That is an SAT question taken from from page 82 of 'SAT Writing Essentials' by Lauren Starkey. The error picked in the book is (d) INTRODUCED with the explanation that it should be in the present tense since the sentence is in the present tense. But I don't think that is an error; I think it's used because of 'has'. Please help...Read More...
I think it'd be great if you did, David.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Using "for"

Am I using the word "for" correctly here? Should I use "with" or should I add a verb between "for" and "accessories"? Thank you for the help. Sentence: "This is a collaborative resource that provides endless design inspiration for accessories."Read More...
Hello, Helithos, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! I'd like to have our moderator's opinion about this issue, but I'll give you my view. Even if "accessories" is an object and thus not capable of being inspired, "for" seems to be introducing the beneficiary of that inspiration. I'd prefer this version: - This is a collaborative resource that provides endless inspiration for accessory designers / designers of accessories.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Conditional sentence

hi what is difference between these sentences? if I see him, I will call you. if I should see him, I will call you. in other words, what is the role, or maybe the advantage, of "should" in if-clause? thanks in advanceRead More...
Hello, Leonard-Jones, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! "should" only adds some improbability to Type 1 conditionals. You can consider your sentence: - If I should see him, I will call you. to be equivalent to: - If by any chance I see him, I will call you. "should" also allows inversion in the condition: - Should I see him, I will call you. Note: We hope to see you here again. Please remember that all sentences should start with a capital letter. I know that in informal communications...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Set

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Which of these sentences sound normal and are less ambiguous? 1. The next day of hearing has been fixed as July 20, 2019. 2. The next day of hearing is fixed as July 20, 2019. 3. The next day of hearing has been fixed for July 20, 2019. 4. The next day of hearing has been fixed on July 20, 2019. 5. The next day of hearing is fixed for July 20, 2019. 6. The next day of hearing is fixed on July 20, 2019. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks again, Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

for all my life or all my life

Hello, teachers! I've read this piece of information in "English Grammar in Use -5th edition that we don't use "for + all" in sentences like: "I've lived here for all my life." And that the correct form is: "I've lived here all my life." However, some people claim that it is OK so I'm confused. What do you think, teachers?Read More...
Thanks, Mr David 🌹Read More...
Last Reply By ayman · First Unread Post

Whose

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Whose right it is to institute anything may abrogate it. The above sentence is from BURTON’S LEGAL THESAURUS, Thirty-fifth Anniversary/Fifth Edition, and appears under the headword ABROGATE . How acceptable are this type of sentences nowadays? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot, David and Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

and vs. or

a. In those days, people generally believed that men were better suited to become scientists and artists. b. In those days, people generally believed that men were better suited to become scientists or artists. c, When I was a child, all my friends wanted to become pilots and astronauts. d. When I was a child, all my friends wanted to become pilots or astronauts. Are all of these sentences grammatically correct? Do (a) and (b) mean the same? Do (c) and (d) mean the same? Many thanks.Read More...

as much of

Which are correct: 1) He is as much a writer as a journalist. 2) He is as much a writer as you are. 3) He is as much of a writer as a journalist. 4) He is as much of a writer as you are. 5) He is more a writer than a journalist. 6) He is more a writer than you are. 7) He is more of a writer than a journalist. 8) He is more of a writer than you are. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

about vs of

May I know which of the following sentence is grammatically correct? (1) The introduction is written with clear scenario about the topic. (2) The introduction is written with clear scenario of the topic.Read More...
Noted, thanks for the clarification. Capt (Rtd) Joshua LooRead More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

Is it possible to say "hold the silence"?

I have to write a formal essay about environmental issues. I want to write a sentence: "I can no longer hold the silence about this problem". Is it possible to say this? Or its better to say something like maintain/remain/keep my silence? Which one sounds more formal?Read More...
Hello, Liza02, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Two of the verbs you have proposed (remain, keep) are generally used with the adjective silent. I can only think of the noun "silence" being used with an adjective, as in: maintain a stony silence . Therefore, I suggest you use remain/keep silent .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

State

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following definition of the word “State” (verb) is from the OED. 8.8 To declare in words; to represent (a matter) in all the circumstances of modification; to set out fully or in a definite form. My understanding of the two parts of the threefold definition is something like the following. To declare in words: To describe using words. To set out fully or in a definite form: To describe a thing or event to the full, or to describe a thing or event in a way that is enough...Read More...
Thanks, David, It is really helpful. PS: Additional thanks for writing a 59-word long sentence. It comes so close to my idea of writing prose, though a vast majority of people, here and elsewhere, is of different opinion.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

prepostion in the passive

"A strange letter was sent me." Is this sentence correct?Read More...
I agree with Gustavo that the sentence is much better with "to" included ("A strange letter was sent to me", not "A strange letter was sent me"). The version with "to" is the passive of "Somebody sent a letter to me," whereas the version without "to" is a passive version of the double-object construction "Somebody sent me a letter." The double object construction can be passivized, but, except when the verb is "give," it is generally only the first object that becomes subject. The following...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

where.

cocoricot
Dear teachers, 1. Heaven is where my father is. 2. Heaven is the place where my father is. Please tell me if they are correct. Is it necessary to add ''the place" to the sentence? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Coco and Gustavo, Even though heaven as a theological concept goes beyond the scope of this forum, "heaven" is also used figuratively to refer to what one finds to be an ideal state of being even in worldly life. Now, consider this common proverb: Home is where the heart is. Home is where you hang your hat. "Home" is not necessarily being used in the sense of one's own house, or apartment, or what have you, in those proverbs. The referent of "home" could be any number of things. Indeed,...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

to eat large amounts/numbers of coffee beans

"To produce more coffee, the civets were forced to eat large amounts of coffee beans ." I saw this sentence on the Ivy magazine (published in Taiwan). We all know that we should use amount with uncountable nouns, but here it goes with coffee beans (a plural countable noun). Is it correct? How about I change it into "large numbers of coffee beans"? I have to say the use of "numbers" here sounds odder, though. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Barry, I agree with you that "numbers" sounds worse than "amounts." That might be because "number" makes us think of the individual units, and coffee beans are not expected to be counted! "amount" gives us the idea of coffee beans forming a large load of things. "quantities" would be perhaps the best choice.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

people

Was going to write a quick thank you for the reference to p3 (plural people possessive). Took too long. This is the short version: Thought I was right, but it is nice to know that there are people who can actually verify it. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks. And you are right. Not only is my keyboard malfunctioning, but two confusing events occurred while I was trying to do a simple task. The comment was in reference to the word -peoples'- Sorry for the confusion. PanurgeRead More...
Last Reply By Panurge · First Unread Post

VOA English

Hello, In VOA English article, I found the following two sentences I don't understand. (1) “In our samples, ninety percent of the plastics we are finding are microfibers… Those are often times originating from textiles or other fibrous synthetic products.” What does "times" in the sentence mean? Chances? possibilities? It doesn't mean the same as that used in " three times a day" does it? (2)“So you think about the, you know, literally millions of garments like this that are being washed...Read More...
Thank you, David. So, oftentimes should be spelled as one word. I now understand the mysterious "the" in my second sentence. appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

preposition after "enthusiasm"

I'd like to know if the preposition should be "for or in" in the following sentence: He has enthusiasm for / in his studies When we decide which preposition we should use in a sentence, do we always look at the word before the preposition, i.e. "enthusiasm" in this case? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Thank you very much, Ahmed and David. You have been very generous with your time. Have a nice day.Read More...
Last Reply By taiman · First Unread Post
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