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happy

1. I'm very happy to learn English. 2. I'm very happy to be learning English. 3. I will be very happy to learn English. Can 1 be used to mean both the notions of 2 and 3? Thanks.☕️☕️☕️Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng—Sentence (1) does not really work at all. The construction of (1) is used for things that can be completed in a relatively short period of time. For example, I can say, "I'm happy to answer this question." But learning English is not such an activity. If the learning had already taken place, you could say: I'm very happy to have learned English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

sentence diagrams

What grade would you give to this diagrammed sentence? Thanks. The man was Lewis Gothamburger whom she had lured into a bizarre scheme to make Russ Faria look like a violent man. 1) This is a simple sentence even though it sounds like it could be a complex sentence if it began with "To make Russ Faria look like a violent man" but "to make" is not an adverbial phrase although infinitive phrases functions as adverbs. I've never seen an adverbial phrase begin with an infinitive phrase. 2) I'm...Read More...
Thanks, David. I knew you guys would have it!! Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By clueless · First Unread Post

Noun clause

Is "the best way forward" a noun clause? Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan said the best way forward for peace and stability in Afghanistan is to engage with the Taliban and "incentivize" them on issues such as women's rights and inclusive government. https://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/15/asia/imran-khan-pakistan-afghanistan-intl-hnk/index.htmlRead More...
In that phrase, "forward" is an adverb. We can, but not in this case.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Parallelism

I have trouble ensuring a sentence is parallel. Below are two examples that I think may have problems, but I am not sure what is the best way to fix them. If they are parallel, why? If they are not, why and how to fix them? Thank you! I thought you tested and would close the task. The account is still being charged and in deficit.Read More...

By vs With

Why does the sentence below use "by the Obamas....", instead of using "with the Obamas.... "? Biden and the first lady are joined by the Obamas and the Clintons for a tribute in New York as the US marks the anniversary of 9/11 . https://edition.cnn.com/us/liv...niversary/index.htmlRead More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

encounter

Confronting the Disclosure's of the Soul: Guilt, Anger, Fear These attitudes display how many of us respond when confronted with the criticism that come with the expression of anger. Based on my dictionaries, <when encountered with> seems to be grammatically wrong, but I found many kinds of uses for <when encountered with> on the Google. Of course, I don't entirely believe in the usages on the Google. Can you confirm that, please?Read More...

adverb

While reading an earlier thread comparing <adverb> and <adjective> , I had one question for this sentence, <He kept his feet warmly in front of the fire>. Of course I think I understand what the sentence conveys, but I want to check it is also OK to use <warm> here with a different meaning. And 1) All house are not constructed equally. 2) All men are not created equal. could <equally> and <equal> each are switched below like <All house are not...Read More...
I got your point, thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

given

I'm wondering which sentence is more natural or correct. I tried to find the explanation of this grammar but I couldn't find it. I'm happy if you drop me a comment. a) Make a sentence with the words given. b) Make a sentence by using the given words.Read More...
Thank you for your answer of my question and I apologize for what I did. I did not read the guidelines. I would try not to do the same thing again.Read More...
Last Reply By ichigolove430 · First Unread Post

mention

---Nobody mentioned going there to help her. Does the sentence above mentioned sound natural to you? I couldn't find this usage in any of my dictionaries. Thanks a lot.😊Read More...
Yes, David. Your assumption is perfectly right.😄 I had only found "mention+noun", "mention+noun clause", but no "mention+v-ing". There was no "mention+to do" either, so I assume it is not acceptable?Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

expect

1. As long as you remain in the position, you have to do what you are expected. 2. As long as you remain in the position, you have to do what you are expected to. 3. As long as you remain in the position, you have to do what you are expected to do. 4. As long as you remain in the position, you have to do what is expected of you. 5. As long as you remain in the position, you have to do what is expected from you. Which sentences above are correct? Many thanks.😊Read More...
In one sense, yes, it is generalizing (to "people in [that position]"). In another sense, it is limiting. "What is expected of you" can be much broader than what is expected of you as a person, since people have lives outside of the positions they hold. Family members expect things of them, etc.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

mood

The fans were in jubilant mood as they left the stadium. In the sentence above, why is "in jubilant mood" used instead of "in a jubilant mood"? Is "in a jubilant mood" acceptable? If so, what is the difference? Many thanks.Read More...
Sorry I forgot to mention where it came from. It is from Longman dictionary of contemporary English.Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

had played - played

Hello moderators. Could you please help me choose the correct answer? Why? - He wanted to know if we (had played - played) squash yesterday. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, I think that both are correct but different. With the past simple, "yesterday" can be the time when "he" asked the question or the time when "we" played squash, while with the past perfect "yesterday" refers to some time before he asked the question yesterday. Yesterday was Monday. It might be the case that yesterday "he" asked if "we" played squash (i.e. if we knew how to play squash), or that "he" asked if "we" played squash on Monday (rather than playing on any other day of the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Please kindly

Can the two phrases above go together, or just one use either please or kindly. e.g. please kindly provide me an authority letter or kindly provide me an authority letter?Read More...
You use either please or kindly, they are both polite, using both in a sentence is like more emphasising on politeness. Here is a good article i found you can read more about https://bigben.academy/please-and-kindly/Read More...
Last Reply By Lee Min-ho · First Unread Post

need help for sentence structure

"There's enormous consumer demand for the services that airlines provide and that's true today even during Covid," said Gary Kennedy, who was general counsel at American Airlines from 2003 until 2014. "Yet through so much of the airline industry history to translate that into a profit has been difficult." [from CNBC ] It is hard for me to understand the structure and meaning of this sentence. Does anyone can help explain?Read More...
Hello, Sarah, The sentence in bold is correct but doesn't sound natural to me, because infinitives are not usually used in subject position. It would have been more natural to use a V-ing or anticipatory "it." "That" refers to the enormous consumer demand for airline services: - Yet through so much of the airline industry history to translate that into a profit has been difficult = However, throughout the history of the airline industry translating that into a profit has been difficult / it...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

happy

1. I'm very happy to learn English. 2. I'm very happy to be learning English. 3. I will be very happy to learn English. Can 1 be used to mean both the notions of 2 and 3? Thanks.☕️☕️☕️Read More...

confront

Confronting the Disclosure's of the Soul: Guilt, Anger, Fear These attitudes display how many of us respond when confronted with the criticism that come with the expression of anger. I do know <faced with> works , but would <when encountered with> be possible? Thank you in advance.Read More...

Correct or not?

Read the reports and add in the four missing sentences a–d. a) Incredibly, the rabbits dug up the valuable finds while making their homes on the island of Skokholm, a remote nature reserve. b) The important finds, which had been buried for thousands of years, were dug from under the ground by rabbits. c) A team from the museum want to visit the island soon to find out more about its amazing secrets. d) Experts are very interested in the finds and want to learn more about the history of the...Read More...

Pronoun

The same source from the previous one. The laws of nature say that the colder an object gets, the heavier it becomes. In that case, water should freeze from the bottom up. But does it really? Absolutely not. Which one is the whole sentence before removing the repeated words, <does it really freeze from the bottom up?> or <does it really happen?> ? I think it is the first one but would the second one be possible? Thanks in advanceRead More...
Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

Chilled

Hi, everyone. I'd probably get laughed at for asking this question, but I honestly can't figure it out. In the sentence, "The wine should be kept chilled in the fridge", is chilled an adjective or an adverb? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, David. Reading your sentence, "He kept his gold securely in a safe-deposit box" and comparing it to "I kept my feet warmly in front of the fire", has helped me better understand how the adverb works. Thank you so much. HI, Gustavo. This sentence from your reply makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post
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