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Relapse used as a non-count noun?

Hi Mr. Evans and everyone, What's your take on the following writings? "There are four main ideas in relapse prevention. First, relapse is a gradual process with distinct stages. ... Fourth, most relapses can be explained in terms of a few basic rules." (source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4553654/) Another example from MW dictionary website: " The lure of such social acclaim helps some avoid relapse . — Maia Szalavitz, Time , 29 Sep. 2021 " Why is it to appropriate to use...Read More...
Hello, OSL, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. "Relapse" can be a count or a non-count noun. In the first paragraph, the first occurrence of "relapse" (which you didn't mark in bold) obviously does not take an article because the main noun is "prevention," but even there the sense of "relapse" is abstract and uncountable, meaning "the state or action of relapsing," as is also the case with the second occurrence of "relapse," where the term seems to be defined: "relapse" is a gradual...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

do or do it

I wonder if both choices are each correct in the below examples. Thank you in advance. 1 I worked late to finish the project although I was not required to (do it/do) . 2 That Christmas present was not what I had been ( hoping/hoping for ). 3 This is not the way I have been ( hoping/hoping for )Read More...
Thank you so much.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

used to

Which choice is right? Vegetables don't taste as delicious as (they used to be - they used to do). In my opinion both are right. We can complete the sentence in two ways....... 1-..........as they used to be delicious. 2- ........as they used to taste delicious. Thanks in advance for your help.Read More...
Thanks Mr.David for your replyRead More...
Last Reply By Ahmed towab · First Unread Post

‘that’ is relative pronoun or relative adverb?

Hello, everyone, " Over a period of time the buildings which housed social, legal, religious, and other rituals evolved into forms that we subsequently have come to recognize and associate with those buildings’ function . This is a two-way process; the building provides the physical environment and setting for a particular social ritual such as traveling by train or going to the theater, as well as the symbolic setting." * source; https://books.google.co.kr/boo...forms%22&f=false For the...Read More...
Hello, David, thanks a million for your support as always.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

engagement

Can I use "in" instead of "with"? Thank you. Globalization of Language and Culture in Asia Professor Vaish has shown how Chinese and Indian children in Singapore are networked into the pan-Chinese and pan-Indian culture through their engagement with Chinese pop music and Indian movies respectively.Read More...
Hi, Dude—No, "with" is the only preposition that makes sense there. They engage/interact with the music and movies. "Engage in" would indicate that they did the music or did the movies, and that doesn't make any sense.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past Perfect

In this Indian website ( www.eguardian.co.in ). I found this question. Jack and John ____ helpful. had been be have been was The answer is (had been). But how? which context?Read More...
Hi, Izzathanna, Yes, there should be more context to establish the time frame in the past if you want to go with 'had been'. With no further context or if the situation is related to the present, 'have been' is the correct answer.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Besides

https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary Besides going to aerobics twice a week, she rides horses on Saturdays. Can I write "Beside going," instead of "Besides going"?Read More...
Thanks for your reply. According to the Oxford online dictionary, "beside" can mean " in addition to," then, would it be possible to say the expression of "beside going.."? What did I miss here?Read More...
Last Reply By Dude · First Unread Post

antecedent

Could you tell me what "which" indicate in the sentence? "the course," or "constant competition"? One of the forces that drive evolution is a constant competition among species, in the course of which one species gains temporary advantage through an evolutionary innovation. sourceRead More...
I got it. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By Dude · First Unread Post

parts

Hello, Here is a sentence from TIME HEALTH. From the beginning, the pandemic has been a crisis that is equal parts biology and geography. What does "parts" in the sentence above mean? What is the part of speech? Is it a noun? If so, why plural? Is it an adverb? I can sort of guess the meaning, The pandemic has something to do with where you live and how your health condition is. AppleRead More...
I see. Thank you, David. I also incorrectly typed " is" instead of "if " and I corrected it. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Could and could have

I ...... that hat. I'd look silly and people would laugh at me. - could wear - could have worn - couldn't have worn - should have worn I found this question in an Egyptian book. But when I searched the internet I found the answer is (couldn't wear). But I still cannot understand it.Read More...
Thanks a lot Mr. David .Read More...
Last Reply By izzathanna · First Unread Post

"second conditional for future?"

Hello sir, Hope you're doing well. my teacher asked me this question and I'm quite unsure about the answer. ((If you studied harder, you would pass the exam easily. This sentence expresses a possibility in the future. True OR False? And why?)) Thank you in advance💙Read More...
Thank you Mr. David, Now I have a better understanding of it💙Read More...
Last Reply By Boroj Nouri · First Unread Post

"Deeply disastrous"

Hi there, Hope you're well! I just wanted to ask if it's ungrammatical/semantically wrong to say "deeply disastrous"? The reason being that I recently used it in an article I wrote and the editor removed the "deeply". Thanks, CameronRead More...
My understanding is that, as the term denotes an extreme, a word can be used to lessen its effect — and, therefore, the exact term would not be "disastrous" but something less than that. What you can't do is increase the sense of the word. At most, it can be reinforced.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

No Will I

I was watching the TV show SUITS, and I heard this sentence “no will I”. Could you please tell me what it means? Is it an inversion for “I will not”, or something similar to “neither will I”? Thank you so much in advance. Regards.Read More...
Hi, JessyA—My best guess is that you heard " Nor will I" with odd pronunciation.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

to quote

At the Sixteenth Nobel Conference, held in 1980, scientists, musicians, and philosophers all agreed, to quote Freeman Dyson, that “the analogies between science and art are very good as long as you are talking about the creation and the performance. (Source) Can I use <quoting> instead of <to quote> here? Thank you in advance.Read More...
Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

have been playing poker during this summer vacation

Hello, everyone, I know we can use 'present perfect continuous' tense for the repeated continuing events, which started at a particular time in the past and are still continuing up until now as follows: * I’ve been going to Spain on holiday every year since 1987 . * She’s been playing tennis on and off for three years . Then, is the sentence - ' They have been playing poker during this summer vacation .' possible, too? Your help would be appreciated, since I haven't seen the case with the...Read More...
Hi, David, in my first reply I meant 'surprising' to point out something unequalled that is not commented by others. Now I've become to understand what you mean. What has been the problem is the preposition - during - itself. Once again I would thank you for your wonderful comment.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

anticipatory 'it'

a. It hurts me remembering those days. b. It bothers me talking to him. c. It is good for you eating fruit and vegetables. d. It is nice sitting here. Are the above sentences grammatically correct? I think they are all fine, however I'd use the infinitive in the first three cases. I don't know why (d) sounds natural to me and the other three not so much. Many thanksRead More...

Acronym & abbreviation

It's known that (acronym) is an abbreviation for the first letters of some words like ( NATO ) and it's pronounced as one word.But what about the words that are pronounced as separate letters like ( USA, FBI). They are initials but pronounced as separate letters not one word. Can we call them acronyms, too.? In my opinion, we can call them acronyms, what do you think? Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, If you want to use a specific term, they are called initialisms, particularly they are preceded by the definite article. (Acronyms aren't preceded by the definite article). If you want to use a general term, you can call them acronyms , but this is an opinion which sticklers would challenge. Some people call them abbreviations, and that is absolutely true. Wikipedia mentions that Acronyms can be pronounced as words, like NASA and UNESCO; sometimes as individual letters, as in FBI.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

modals

Which are correct: 1) Before leaving we'll check what the weather is like. If it may rain, we will take our raincoats. 2) Before leaving we'll check what the weather is like. If it might rain, we will take our raincoats. 3) Before leaving we'll check what the weather is like. If it can rain, we will take our raincoats. 4) Before leaving we'll check what the weather is like. If it could rain, we will take our raincoats. The idea is: If there is a chance of rain, we'll take our raincoats.Read More...
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