All Forum Topics

decades-long , decade-long

Hello, Here is a sentence from a TIME article. If Clinton has proven one thing over the course of her decades-long stint in politics, itโ€™s that Hillary Clinton is going to Hillary Clinton. My question. Why do you say "decades-long" while you say "year-long" not "years-long"? Is there a difference between a plural and singular? "year-long" means just one year and "years-long" means more than two years? YokoRead More...
Admittedly wildly late to this conversation, but while I agree with others on the "decades-long" issue, I disagree that the verb be was left out. In my sense of it, the author is using the name "Hillary Clinton" as a verb, in the same way we now "Google" something. So the sense of it is that Hillary Clinton is going to continue to do all the things we associate with Hillary Clinton. She's going to Hillary Clinton the **** out of things.Read More...
Last Reply By David Irwell · First Unread Post

Point of view and interpretation.

Hi Guys, The following are two snippets which I have written for a treatise. When I ask a person which they prefer, I get a clear 50-50 response rate. Some like option 1 and others seem to prefer option 2. Feedback from an editor suggests option one is accusatory and should be avoided, however, individuals who preferred option 1 inform after they have read it, view it as 'helpful advice' rather than instructional or didactic . The second professional feedback was in relation to point of view...Read More...

Admit

Karim admitted ..................... the plate and said he was sorry. a) breaking b) to break c) to breaking d) break This sentence is taken from a mock exam in the workbook of 3rd year secondary, Egypt. (practice test 5 B) The answer in the book is "breaking" but I see no reason for not using both "breaking" and "to breaking". RegardsRead More...
Greetings, everybody, I agree with your answer, Ahmed_btm, though I can't say I find the "model answer" to be the most natural here. I would not naturally say, "He admitted breaking the plate." I would naturally say, "He admitted to breaking the plate." Thus, if I had to choose a "model answer" to the question among the listed choices, I'd choose (c). If I used V-ing immediately after "admitted," I would use the perfective: (e) Karim admitted having broken the plate and said he was sorry.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

grammar

Dear teachers, please help me find out the right answer. Which sentence is correct? 1- I am an English teacher. 2- I am a teacher of English.Read More...
Hi, Ramdan, welcome to the G.E. and Happy Ramadan, Both are correct. The first one is ambiguous as it could refer to either the nationality or the the job. It seems that, in speech, stress has its role here, but, in writing, the meaning depends on the context. The second sentence is more obvious and more precise as it just refers to the job. It has just one meaning: 'I am an English language teacher'. 'An English teacher' is more common, though. I still remember the words of one of this...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

On or while

................he was student , he was writing short stories. On /While the answer was while in the book but i don't know why because the rule is while past continuous , past simple.Read More...
Hi, Poet20, "On" is a preposition. It is not a subordinating conjunction, like "while." Prepositions do not introduce subordinate clauses.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Please

Can " please " be used as a verb to mean " beg " or " ask " ? I mean, are these two sentences the same? 1) I begged him to help me. 2) I pleased him to help me. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Yama, No, it can't. No. Only the first sentence works. The second is ungrammatical. But you can say: 1a) I begged/asked him to please help me. In (1a), we understand that the begging/asking involved the word "please."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Adjectival or adverbial?

James, hiding under the bed, was completely silent. Is "hiding under the bed" adjectival? Some say it is adverbial. (Source: Complete English Grammar Course by Peter Herring. Entry: participle)Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Yes, "hiding under the bed" may be analyzed either way in that sentence. According to the adjectival interpretation, the sentence is short for this: James, who was hiding under the bed, was completely silent. According to the adverbial interpretation, "hiding under the bed" is a participial phrase that specifies why James was completely silent. Compare: James, hiding under the bed, felt claustrophobic. I personally find the adjectival interpretation more natural in your example.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

subject and verb agreement.

Hello~ I wonder if the subject and verb agreement rule can be applied in both (a) and (b) to represent the abstract thing, making any distinction of count and non count nouns. a) The next thing on the list is cheese. b) The next thing on the list is egg. Thank you.Read More...
Interesting. I'm sure you're right, David, that these are standard grocery items, and that I have seen them, but I've never noticed them, to the best of my recollection. This is probably because I wasn't looking for them. I'm not adverse to eggs, but the idea of bottled liquid egg(s) doesn't appeal to me. The same is true of powdered egg(s), which, I understand, was standard breakfast fare when my father was in the army. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

which vs. who

Can one say a. Which are happier: the Americans or the Greeks? b. Who is happier: the Americans or the Greeks? c. Who are happier: the Americans or the Greeks? ? Many thanks.Read More...

Causative " have "

I came across this question while I was looking at some questions related to the causative form. * They had their lawyer ................. their will. a) changed b) to change c) changing d) changes According to what I know, " have " in the causative form is followed by an "infinitive". Can you give me the answer to this question ? Thanks.Read More...
Thank you all.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

to last a week/infinitives!

1) He has food to last a week. 2) He has enough food to last a week. Is the food going to last a week or he? ================================= 3) They have money to buy a house. Is '3' correct? I'd either use 'enough money' or 'the money'. I don't like '3'. But '1' seems fine. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

have someone to teach...

1) She has someone to teach to dance. 2) She has someone to teach dancing. 3) She has someone to teach dancing to. In which cases: a) The 'someone' in question is taught dancing by her and in which cases: b) The 'someone' in question teaches dancing. I think '3' is clear. It seems to me that '2' means the 'someone' is doing the teaching. I am not sure about '1' at all. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Right you are, Navi. I did mean 'meaning (a).' Sorry about that. I've just edited that comment, notating that I edited it. Sometimes I accidentally jumble the letters and numbers when we're playing syntactico-semantic Connect the Dots.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

to improve one's condition

1) "I hold the value of life is to improve one's condition. " The sentence is by Abraham Lincoln. Source: https://books.google.com/books...prove%22&f=false I have a problem with: The value of life is to improve one's condition. I don't get the meaning of the sentence. One could read it as saying "The value of life is supposed to improve one's condition." The sentence would be similar to: I am to see John this afternoon. I don't think the sentence is supposed to be read that way. But 'to...Read More...
Navi, For what it's worth, David left out one minor point, which is that the full infinitive (to + V) and any clause that is introduced by this construct is, in fact, treated as a noun, not a verb. Thus the noun phrase "the value of life" can be equated with the noun phrase "to improve one's condition" using a simple copulative. If the main verb requires the particle "to" to introduce the subordinate clause ("it is supposed to ...", "I meant to ...", "I intend to ..."), then "to" is properly...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

perfect tenses

a. I have been seeing that guy at our office for at least five years. b. I have seen that guy at our office for at least five years. Is there any difference between the meanings of (a) and (b)? Which could be used if I won't see that guy again? Which could be used if I will keep on seeing him at our office? Could either be used if that guy passed away a couple of days ago? Wouldn't one have to use the past perfect and past perfect progressive in that case? Many thanks.Read More...
Azz, (a) implies that the two of you are dating. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Lightning or electrical storm

Hi, "A/An .......occurs when we hear loud noises and see bright flashes of light". A- electrical storm B- electric storm C- lightning Thank youRead More...
Ahmed and Ahmed, I apologize for my prolonged absence from the forum, hence my long delay in responding to this. As a native speaker, I would never say "an electric storm". We always say "an electrical storm" instead, so (A) is the best choice among the options given. Ahmed_btm is quite right in saying that we commonly refer to these as "thunder storms" and "lightning storms". These terms, especially "thunder storm", are much more common than "electrical storm" where I live. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

ten more dollars

a, I had to pay ten more dollars to get what I wanted. b. I had to pay another ten dollars to get what I wanted. c. I had to pay ten dollars in addition to what I had paid to get what I wanted. d. I had to pay ten dollars more than I had paid to get what I wanted. e. I had to pay ten dollars more than what I had paid to get what I wanted. I think the sentences are all grammatical, but do the last two mean the same as the others? I am not sure about that. Let's say I had paid 40 dollars to...Read More...
Hi, Azz, I see your point and agree with you that (d) and (e) can mean that. However, they can also be used to mean what (a), (b), and (c) mean. Imagine that you just paid John the $40. He might say, "You need to pay $10 more." The obvious meaning is that he needs to give John $10; the cost is $50. But suppose you don't understand John. "Ten dollars more than what?" you ask. "You need to pay ten dollars more than (what) you just paid me," he would reply. John would understand himself to be...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

seemed / looked / was very pitiful

Do we accept the following sentences? 1 The beggar seemed / looked / was very pitiful. 2 They felt pitiful to the beggar. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, Sentence (1) is OK, but (2) is not -- assuming you are trying to say what I think you are trying to say in (2). You can say: (2a) They pitied the beggar. (2b) They felt bad for the beggar.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

connector - which / that

IS there considered correct? 1 Susan helped the elderly woman which was not for her money. 2 The laptop has a powerful processor that is energy saving. ThanksRead More...
Hi, bear_bear, Sentence (1) is incorrect. What are you trying to say? Are you trying to say this? (1a) Susan helped the elderly woman, but not because she wanted her money. In (2), you need a hyphen between "energy" and "saving." I recommend: (2a) The laptop has a powerful, energy-saving processor .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Make Interesting / Find Friends?

Are these sentences considered correct? 1 I want make interesting friends around the world. 2 I can find more friends from another country. 3 I can meet interesting friends from korea, England and many more (countries) through the website. ThanksRead More...
Hi, bear_bear, Sentences (2) and (3) are OK, except for the fact that you didn't capitalize the "K" in "Korea." But (1) is incorrect. You can't say, " I want make interesting friends around the world ." You can't ever say " I want make ." You can say, "I want to make . . ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

login to / into / on

Which are considered correct? 1 I must login to / into / on the website. 2 I must go into / onto / on the website. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, You can use (2) -- all three variations are OK -- but (1) is wrong. "Log in" is two words, though it is commonly spelled as (1) by people who don't know better. You can tell from the -ing form that "log in" should be spelled as two words. We speak of " logging in ," not of " logining ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

relative clause

a. Yi Sun-shin was one of the greatest admirals, who made the Turtle Ship. b. Yi Sun-shin, who made the Turtle Ship, was one of the greatest admirals. Are they both correct and natural? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Kis, Both are unnatural (outside of context, at least), and only (b) is correct. Is there a reason you are making "made the Turtle Ship" a subordinate piece of information? Why not use an appositive? There are two options for appositives, depending on what you want to make the main point of the sentence: c. Yi Sun-shin, one of the greatest admirals, made the Turtle Ship. d. Yi Sun-shin, designer of the Turtle Ship, was one of the greatest admirals.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×