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what can all of us do

a. What can all of us do? Is this sentence ambiguous? First meaning: What can we all do together? Second meaning: What can every one of us do? b. What can each of us do? Is this sentence ambiguous? First meaning: Each of us can do one or more things, but they differ from person to person (there might be overlap). What are the thing or things each different person can do? Second meaning: What can every one of us do? We can all do the same thing or things. c. What can any of us do? Is this...Read More...

run out / run out of something / be out of something

Now I am confused that somebody or something can be used as a subject in the following idioms. 1) Run out of Somebody run out of something: We were running out of food 2) Run out Something run out: The milk has run out. 3) be out of something 3-a) Somebody be out of something: Would you mind going to the store? We're out of milk. 3-b) Something be out of something: The official Olympic umbrella is out of stock. My question is, 1) "Run out of something" can be used with Somebody as a subject?Read More...
Thank for your teaching. . A) We ran out of fuel. (O) B2) He runs out of cigarettes (plural). (O) C1) There was no toilet paper. It ran out. (O) C2) There was no toilet paper. We ran out of it. (O) D) A restroom ran out of toilet paper. (▲ Okay, but not good) F1) Toilet paper was out. (O or X ??? I still don't know...) G) A restroom was out of toilet paper. (O) . Now I think I am nearly getting to know how to use "run out of something" and "be out of something. I guess I have to clearly say...Read More...
Last Reply By TaeBbongE · First Unread Post

Who or whom?

I came across this sentence in a reference book ,but I don't remember its name. The man ( who - whom) I bought the car from is friendly. Model answer is : who. But what about ( whom) My explanation is that( whom ) is not an object pronoun in this context. What do you think of it?Read More...
To add more to what has been said, I'm sending an excerpt from an English course by an American professor, Anne Curzan (the interrogative pronouns section):Read More...
Last Reply By Lucas · First Unread Post

Difference between Avenge and Revenge

1.I wonder whether the word "avenge" implicits they avengers are doing something for justice while the word "revenge" refers to something negative. 2.As I know, "avenge" is a transitive word. But I am not sure whether the sentences below all make sense. (a) He avenged his father on the murderer. (b) He avenged his father's death. (c) He avenged the murderer who killed his father. Thanks a lot.Read More...
OK. So "avenge" is a little bit old-fashioned and obsolete today. Hahaha, I learned the word from the Hollywood blockbusters Avengers. Anyway, thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By Winter · First Unread Post

Punctuation assistance

Looking for another way to punctuate this sentence without comma overuse: Riding up to Henry’s side, his trusted advisor, the Duke of Westmorland, woefully wishes that “we now had here But one ten thousand of those men in England That do no work today!”Read More...
Im thinking of, 'The Duke of Westmorland, his trusted advisor riding up to Henry’s side woefully wishes that “we now had here But one ten thousand of those men in England That do no work today!”' But im mot sure if we can leave out the commas like that.Read More...
Last Reply By Lucas · First Unread Post

stopped to talk, stopped talking

Hello. What is the difference in meaning between the two sentences? 1- My friend stopped talking to me on his way home. 2- My friend stopped talking to me on his way home. Thank you.Read More...
Yep, as Taiman said. The meaning of the two is quite opposite to each other: in the former your friend is about to start talking, in the latter your friend finished talking.Read More...
Last Reply By Lucas · First Unread Post

Antecedent of "where"

Hi. Does "where" refer to "among millennial women" in the following sentence? - Rent the Runway, a popular online retailer offering designer dresses and accessories for rent, has surged to success among millennial women where luxury designers might have normally been out of their financial reach. Link: https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_8048648Read More...
Hi, Robby zhu, I don't think "where" is a relative adverb there, but a conjunction introducing the area where the mentioned online designer has succeeded and where conventional luxury designers have failed. I understand that area to be the supply of designer dresses and accessories to millennial women. Personally, I find the sentence confusing. I understand "their financial reach" to refer to the financial reach of millennial women. I think the sentence would be clearer as follows: - Rent...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

SENTENCE TYPE?

My brother teaches English and French . - Is this a simple sentence or a compound sentence? My brother and sister teach English at a school. - Is this a simple sentence or a compound sentence? My brother worked hard and passed the final examination . - Is this a simple sentence or a compound sentence?Read More...
Hi, oabootty, All of the sentences above (next time, please number them) are simple. Sentence (2) has a compound subject, and sentence (3) has a compound predicate. For a sentence to be compound, there has to be a subject and predicate linked with (at least) another subject and predicate, for example: 4. My brother teaches English and my sister teaches French.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Before me

Often in the court decision paper, it uses the word "before". What is it trying to emphasize here? e.g. The evidence before the Tribunal does not establish that clients relied upon any form of advertising by the applicants in relation to any of the services...Read More...
I agree with Ahmed's reply. The preposition "before" there has a meaning similar to "in front of one's eyes." For example, when I close my translations into English I write: I DO HEREBY CERTIFY THE FOREGOING TO BE A TRUE, FULL, AND CORRECT TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH OF THE COPY OF THE ORIGINAL DOCUMENT WRITTEN IN SPANISH WHICH I HAVE HAD BEFORE ME, TO WHICH I REFER, AND WHICH I ATTACH HERETO IN THE CITY OF ..., ON [DATE].Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

"juggle career and family life" or "juggle a career and a family life"

Is this sentence grammatically correct? "In modern days, high-achieving women who have to juggle career and family life are taking enormous stress and responsibilities on their shoulders?" - I'm not quite sure about whether it should be "juggle career and family life" or "juggle a career and a family life"... or any other better way to write it?Read More...
Hello, CaraGrace, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. While I can understand why Ahmed_btm might prefer "juggle a career and a family life," I myself strongly prefer "juggle career and family life." You are speaking of juggling two different types of life (career life and family life), rather than a certain type of life with a career. The phrase "juggle career and family life" is a reduction of "juggle career life and family life" in which "career and family" are two conjoined attributive...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Enquiry

-............... is an advantage of donating blood. A. Having blood pressure check B. Having blood pressure checked C. Have blood pressure check D. Have blood pressure checked Please, which option is correct.I see that 'a' is ok.A gerund subject with a noun phrase rather than using causative as a subject. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Mohamed—I agree with Ahmed_btm that (b) is the only correct option. I find it unnatural, however, without the addition of "your" before "blood pressure": (B1) Having your blood pressure checked is an advantage of donating blood. Please visit our Guidelines page at the top to learn why "Enquiry" is not a good title for a thread at a site where only inquiries are made.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

have children playing

Hello, everyone, In a sentence - “It's lovely to have children playing in the garden again.“, which has been quoted from Practical English Usage , the author explains this ‘ have ’ means ‘experience ’. When I paraphrase above sentence using ‘ experience ’ instead of ‘ have ’, which one of following two suggestions is better?; 1. It's lovely to experience children who are playing in the garden again. 2. It's lovely to experience the fact that children are playing in the garden again. If none...Read More...
Hello, David, always appreciate your good comments enough for me to learn. Best RGDS,Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Take or do

When you finish your study, what job would you like to ( do - take)? I tend to choose ( take ) in this context. What do you think? Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed—I wouldn't use either one, though both are OK. I'd say: When you finish your studies, what do you plan to do with your degree? When you finish your studies, what job to you hope to get?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

or 'feeling' pride ...

Hello, everyone, Typically, older people experience more positive emotions than negative ones in daily life. The experience isn’t purely “happy.” Rather, our emotions grow richer and more complex over time. We experience more co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions, such as those poignant occasions when you get a tear in the eye at the same time you feel joy, or feeling pride at the same time you feel anger — a capacity we call “emotional complexity.” * source;...Read More...
Sincerely appreciate your usual assistance. RGDS,Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

think of your brain as a product of your genes and mostly 'unchanging', 'growing'

Hello, everyone, While you may think of your brain as a product of your genes and mostly unchanging , growing until you reach a certain age and then unaffected by your lifestyle and environment, the reality is that your brain is always in a state of change. In addition to all of the functions your brain orchestrates, it has the ability to “clean house” to eliminate connections between brain cells no longer in use. * partly quoted from the book, “ Boost Your Brain Power in 60 Seconds : The...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo--long time, no see (my feeling). Yes, yours helps me a lot, indeed! RGDS,Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

comma before a prepositional phrase

A. There was my father, with tears in his eyes. B. There was my father with tears in his eyes. Given sentences A and B, is sentence A only grammatical because, without the comma, sentence B can imply that there were more than one father? So, is sentence A, where "with tears in his eyes", which is set off by the comma, as non-restrictive information, qualifies "my father", correct English if there was only one father? I think that on the condition that there was only one father, sentence A...Read More...
Hello, MinJ, I think both (A) and (B) can work. "There" can be an adverb of place (meaning: in that place), in which case there is inversion of "My father was there," or a pronoun used with the verb be to specify the people present: A1. There was my father, with tears in his eyes, and my mother, with a smile on her face. B2. There was my father with tears in his eyes and my mother with a smile on her face. (Similar to: My father was crying and my mother was smiling.)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reasons and reasonings

Hi, What are the differences between reasons and reasonings? e.g. Having reviewed the reasonings/reasons set out in your letter, we are of the view that.....Read More...
Hi, Tony, Have you checked the dictionary? The noun "reasoning" refers to the line of thought, or argumentative process, followed by a person. It is an action. The noun "reason" is more concrete. If you could provide more context, we might be able to define which one fits better.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Understanding a subordinate clause

1) Tanmay Rath holds a Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from IIT Kharagpur, with post doctoral experience in nanomaterials research in eastern Asia. However, for the last three years, he has been engaged in a project teaching chemistry to undergraduate engineering students in Motihari, a small town in Bihar’s East Champaran district. (https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/1200-faculty-in-rural-engineering-colleges-will-lose-jobs-by-month-end/article33956298.ece) Q: In (1) above, does the...Read More...
Hi, Language learner, I don't think a "by"+participle phrase is a correct paraphrase. The V-ing after "a project" seems to me to be an apposition, as it describes what the project consists of. Notice that, in the absence of the noun head, you can use the gerund: - He has been engaged in teaching chemistry to undergraduate engineering students (= in the teaching of chemistry to undergraduate engineering sudents). If instead of the indefinite we have the definite article, the preposition "of"...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

more than I used to because

1) I loved him more than I used to because he was intelligent. 2) I loved him more than I used to love him because he was intelligent. 3) I loved him more than I used to for his intelligence. 4) I loved him more than I used to love him for his intelligence. Are those sentences ambiguous? a) Because he intelligent, I loved him more than I used to. I discovered that he was intelligent and my love for him grew. b) I used to love him for his intelligence, but now I loved him more. It seems to me...Read More...

non-restrictive clauses

Can one say: 1-I called my cousin, in Germany. instead of: 2-I called my cousin, who is in Germany. Can one say: 3-I read his book, about the Big Bang. instead of: 4-I read his book, which is about the Big Bang. Can one say: 5-I went to the ABC bar, on the fifth avenue. instead of: 6-I went to the ABC bar, which is on the fifth avenue. In each case we have non-restrictive (ie. non-defining clauses).Read More...
Would you help me out David with my previous reply? I made it short.Read More...
Last Reply By MinJ · First Unread Post
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