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the only one of

Hello, I have a question about the combination "the only one of the". Which of the following sentences is correct, grammatically speaking? 1. Hannah is the only one of those people who likes to read comic books. 2. Hannah is the only one of those people who like to read comic books. There are two justifications, I believe: For #1, we can say that in this construction, the antecedent of the relative pronoun "who" isn't "people"; it's "one." She is the only one who likes to read comic books.Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Only (1) is correct: of all those people, Hannah is the only one who likes to read comic books. "One of" is partitive: one member of the group. If the others are also fond of comic books, then you should differentiate Hannah from the rest, and "among" would sound better: 3. Hannah is the only grown-up among those people who like to read comic books. (All the other comic book readers in the group are children or teenagers.) In this case, you can also use the singular, but the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Awaiting and waiting

Can the above verbs used interchangeably? For example: Sorry for the delayed response as I was waiting/awaiting my business partner to get back to me.Read More...
Hi, Cristi, In this case you should say: - I was waiting for my business partner to get back to me. or - I was awaiting a response from my business partner.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

sentence structure

I received a call on my mobile of a marketing executive from the BMW showroom in Jeddah. I got a call from a marketing executive from a BMW showroom in Jeddah on my mobile. Which sentence is correct?Read More...
Hi, GrammarMan—In the first example, "of" should be replaced with "from." We don't receive/get calls of people. We get/receive calls from people.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

we who are...

Could one use a. We of a certain age remember those days well. and b. We who are of a certain age remember those days well. instead of c. Those of us who are of a certain age remember those days well. ? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz—Yes, those three sentences can be used interchangeably. But please do not infer from this that you can do this with any prepositional phrase after a pronoun. "We of a certain age" works well idiomatically and has that meaning.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

You can/could roast a chicken whole or in pieces, you know

Alex: I don't want to give the kids boiled chicken for lunch again, but I have to use up this whole hen and these few legs before they go bad. (1) Doug: You can/could roast a chicken whole or in pieces, you know. (I think "a chicken" means chicken in general here) (2) Doug: You can/could roast the c hicken whole or in pieces, you know. (Here the chicken refers to the chicken Alex is talking about) Q: Are they both equally correct as suggestions ? Or only the second sentence sound like a...Read More...

"either/or" vesus "both"

Hi, In both sentences below the use of "either/or" and "both" are correct ? 1-Action potential duration was not altered by palmitate in either untrained or trained cardiomyocytes. 2-Action potential duration was not altered by palmitate in both untrained and trained cardiomyocytes.Read More...
Perfect. Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By marcofabri · First Unread Post

The use of quotation mark

Section 123B of the Income Tax Act 1928 ("ITA 1928") provides that where........ Can I not use the quotation mark for the one in bracket, so it reads as follows: Section 123B of the Income Tax Act 1928 (ITA 1928) provides that where........ Thanks!!!Read More...
You should use two, for example: - Under the Landlord-Tenant Acts ("the Acts"), both tenants and landlords have to abide by strict rules.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

unless

Hello. Is the following sentence correct using "unless"? If not, why. I think "unless" means that "something can only happen or be true in a particular situation" or means "except under the following circumstances" Fast food is great unless you eat too much of it. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed Imam Attia—Yes, "Fast food is great unless you eat too much of it" is correct. It means: "Fast food is great if you do not eat too much of it."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

prepositional phrase as a modifier

1) " As it happened " reports an event whose occurrence was previously in doubt or not expected, often in contrast to what was expected . Q) What does the underlined part describe/modify in the previous sentence? Does it modify the verb "report"? Or does it modify the noun "an event"? Or the clause "whose occurrence was previously in doubt or not expected"?Read More...
Hi, Language learner—"Often in contrast to what was expected" modifies the verb phrase headed by "reports" ("reports an event whose occurrence was previously in doubt or not expected"). Compare: This phrase reports, often in contrast to what was expected, an event whose occurrence was previously in doubt or not expected.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

To quote~

Hello, Grammar Exchange members! 1. To quote the first Children’s Miracle Network Dance Marathon’s mission statement: “We dance for those who can’t.” (source: https://www.uadm.org/our-mission) I've run into the sentence above while surfing the Internet and been wondering why the part before colon ("To quote ~ statement") is not a sentence. I think it should be a sentence. I don't know what the function of to-infinitive ("To quote") is in the sentence above. Please solve this problem that I...Read More...
Always crystal clear explanation! Thanks a lot, David!Read More...
Last Reply By KDog · First Unread Post

Punctuation

Do these sentences have the correct punctuation? What is the cause of using the punctuation mark in each sentence? 1- He was a man without a plan ; a rebel without a cause. 2- Humanity has only one thing left : hope.Read More...
Hi, David, I completely agree with you. I was going to say that the semicolon is misused here, but that site was like a barrier and forced me to try to find any justification for its model answer.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

lone vs alone

Hello, I would be most grateful if you could provide me with two or more sentences that would help a learner to see the subtle difference between alone and lone. After serching through dictionaries it seems to me that alone means without others and lone means solitary, but isn't that the same thing? Thank you as always.Read More...
Thanks for your reply and answerRead More...
Last Reply By Mrchuffie · First Unread Post

the speakers are optimistic

Hello could you please help me with the following question: - Which sentence shows the speakers are optimistic that the project will go ahead. a· I have little doubt that the project had great potential. b. It's odds on that the project will fall flat on its face. c. Barring a miracle, this project is bound to hit the dust almost immediately. d. There's no way this project is going to see the light of day. Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, David. I am really sorry. I made a mistake when I searched the synonyms of 'have little doubt'.Read More...
Last Reply By ayman · First Unread Post

Punctuation

Hi, I think we should use "and" instead of the last comma in the following sentence. "People smoke for many reasons: because they are shy, nervous or don't feel at ease in society, to appear sophisticated and older, to be part of a group."Read More...
The elements of the list following the colon are not grammatically parallel. This would work: People smoke for many reasons: to be more outgoing or less nervous , to feel at ease in society , to appear sophisticated or older , to be part of a group , etc.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Along the line

Do I say, something along the line or something along those lines. Are there any differences?Read More...
Hi, Cristi—Unfortunately, your example contains many grammatical errors and is a multiple-run-on sentence. Ignoring the many errors we could talk about and going straight to your question, I will say that you can use " something along those lines " or " something along that line " but not " something along the line ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Singular VS Plural

I don't understand why the verb is singular. The subject of the sentence, 'rate,' looks wrong to me. Could you explain why the subject is not ' rates,' which is plural ? Can I say like 1) ? 1) both male and female internet usage rates were' (Original) Among the five regions, both male and female internet usage rate was the highest in Europe, accounting for 83% and 76% respectively. [original]Read More...
Hi, GBLSU—The original sentence is ungrammatical. "Both rate" is incorrect. We can say "both rates." If we do, and if the phrase is the subject of a clause, the verb will need to show plural agreement. As you have observed, "both rates were" works just fine.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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