All Forum Topics

out

I read these sentences in Understanding and Using English Grammer: Tina is looking out the window. Ali stares out the window. I am used to "out of the window". Since I met it twice, it shouldn't be a misprint. Could you explain please if "out of the window" is correct and why "out the window" is used without "of".Read More...

root

How many roots does English language contain? Is there an answer to such question ? if not, how many words in total does it have ?Read More...

that

Hello; 1-(when I arrived home I remembered I forgot the pasta I wanted.) should we add ''that'' after ''remembered''so the sentence will be ; 2-(when I arrived home I remembered that I forgot the pasta I wanted.) which one is right? thanks in advance for the help.Read More...

Religion, politics, and sex

Hello, dear GE members: I am writing to tell you that these topics -- religion, politics, and sex -- are not good ones to bring up on the Grammar Exchange. They are not welcome in most classrooms, either. If you want to make an oblique reference to these topics, that's OK. But please refrain from stating your preferences or beliefs. Often these statements become incendiary, and we don't want that! We have plenty of other topics to address, while keeping in mind that the English language, its...Read More...

making of/the making of

1-We learnt about making movies. 2-We gained insight into making movies. 3-We learnt about the making of movies. 4-We gained insight into the making of movies. Is there any difference between "1" and "2" on the one hand and "3" and "4" on the other. Which would one use if one was learning to make movies? Gratefully, Navi.Read More...

Cleft sentence with WHICH?

grammarcrazed
My dear English grammar experts: Is it grammatically correct to write a cleft sentence, using WHICH? As in " It was faulty building work which resulted in the collapsing of the house". Or should it be " " It was faulty building work that resulted in the collapsing of the house" ? ThanksRead More...

"How many dollars"

Is it correct or natural to use how many dollars to ask the price of something ? For example: a. How many dollars is a watch ? If you use Google, you'll find sentences like: b. How many dollars is 4.2 million pounds ? c. How many dollars are in one pound ? These sentences are mostly about currency exchange, not about asking prices. Going back to my original question, can I say something like a ?Read More...

How to use the word 'recruit'

Hello, everyone. I am here again to ask if a following sentence is correct. I am arguing that the sentence is not correct online. some people do not agree. Here is it. He recruited doctors from a nearby hospital to stand by his shop eating his hot dogs while wearing their white coats and stethoscopes. I believe that the subject of "wearing" is he in while phrase because the subject of the main clause acts as a subject in while phrase as well where there is a omitted subject like the example...Read More...

Do I need to change the tense?

Hi, In the text below, should the highlighted sentence be changed to the PRESENT TENSE? "Sasha is ten years old. She lives with her parents and two brothers in Primrose Drive. Last week a new family moved into the house next door. They had a daughter who was as old as Sasha . Sasha smiled and waved at her..." Thank you for taking the time to clear my confusion. GilbertRead More...

asked her her name

Hi, I would be very happy if you could tell me whether the use of the double possessive adjective (her her) in the sentence below is odd, or correct and natural in writing ? (It sounds good in Kenny Rogers' "LUCILLE", though.) "...So I walked on over. I sat down and asked her her name." Many thanks. GilbertRead More...

watering can

Hi there, Imagine that you are holding a watering can. Now you tilt it downwards to water your plants. What word do I use to say that water is coming out of the spout of the watering can? I mean, is the water streaming out/pouring out/oozing out/shooting out? I hope you understand my question. Thank you so much for your help. GilbertRead More...

Do

Hello everybody; are these sentences formal in English?if not what's the replacement? I'm doing my test next week. I had to do a test last week. 'do' and 'test' together . thanks in advance.Read More...

Are these sentences correct?

grammarcrazed
My dear grammar experts: Using “It was”, I have to complete the second sentence so that it means exactly the same as the first one. The house collapsed because of faulty building work. It was………………………. The following are my suggested answers. Are they correct? It was [because of faulty building work] that the house collapsed It [was faulty building work that] made the house collapse It was [faulty building work that] caused the house to collapse. Can I use “THE” before “faulty building work”?Read More...

comma - to use or not to use?

Hi, My weakness is never ever being able to decide whether I should or should not use a comma... The sentence is simple: " "His friend, John, is there, too." " Okaasan has said, "When in doubt, don't!" but I'm not sure whether I'm in doubt or not! Please help. Thank you. GilbertRead More...

seem

Do these sentences work and make sense? If not, why not? It seemed to start to rain. It seemed to start raining.Read More...
Hello my dear grammar experts: Could you please tell me which is the best choice in the following question? Commercial builders downplayed ____ a bust in the superheated housing market. a. concerning b. the concern of c. concerned that d. concerns about My first choice is (D), “concerns about a bust in the superheated housing market”. But when I googled “downplayed the concern of a”, I found the following examples: The article reports that Association of Mortgage Intermediaries (AMI) chief...Read More...

by?

Hi, Can I use the preposition (by) for both multiplication and division as in 3x6=18. Three by six is eighteen 6÷6=1. Six by six is one As far as i know it can be used for division but today i was thinking of what is used to describe cars as in 4x4 which is read as four by four. Thanks a lot.Read More...

bought it to use

Which are correct: 1-We bought their shop to use as a storage facility. 2-We bought their shop to use it as a storage facility. 3-We bought their shop to be used as a storage facility. 4-We bought this shop to serve as a storage facility. Gratefully, Navi.Read More...

whom

Which are correct : 1-Harry Jones, meeting with whom is always a pleasure, was at the party. 2-An engineer meeting with whom is always a pleasure was at the party. 3-Harry Jones, with whom it is always a pleasure to meet, was at the party. 4-An engineer with whom it is always a pleasure to meet was at the party. 5-Harry Jones, meeting whom is always a pleasure, was at the party. 6-An engineer meeting whom is always a pleasure was at the party. Gratefully, Navi.Read More...

appositive

Dear teachers I remember many images of emotional hardship in dreams and fantasies during the three and a half years that I struggled to write my thesis, to find ways to "see Dickens' novels whole and my own relationship to them clearly. 1. Is the phrase "to find ways to "see Dickens' novels" an appositive? It it is, is it appositive to emotional hardship? 2. Does 'them' mean Dickens' novels? Thank you in advance. HarryRead More...

confused questions

Hi: i hope you enjoy good health. i have two questions. choose the correct answer: 1- He was (impressed-impressive) by the resourcefulness of his knowledge. My question is (by) here is a preposition of impressive or refers to passive. I think there is a mistake here and (by) must be replaced with (for/due to) 2- Dr. John is one of the professors who (seem-seems) intelligent. my question is (who) here refers to Dr. John or the professorsRead More...

moves like this(these)

It's too early to know how moves like this translate into sales. The sentence above is from CBS news com. "this" doesn't become "these" although it modifies a plural "moves". Is this an idiomatic expression? AppleRead More...

semicolon or comma

Dear Teachers, In the following sentence, can the semicolon be replaced by a comma plus and? If it can be replaced, which one would be better in the sentence? Suddenly, the imaginary ball asserted a life of its own ; it began to expand at a frightening rate so that his pleasure, and ours as well, turned to panic-it seemed unlikely that he could regain control of the ball. Thank you.Read More...

Which prepositions follow 'difference,' 'distinction,' 'comarison,' and 'contrast'

According to Oxford Dictionary, "in" is used with "difference" when different aspects of one thing are compared. For example: Differences in ethical standards between male and female managers. However, I haven't seen any sample sentences that "in" is used with "distinction", "comparison", and "contrast" in order to give detail that what aspect of two things are being compared. I wonder if it's possible to use "in" with those words. For example: We have learned the distinction between boys...Read More...
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