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take on

'Mr. Frodo, sir!' cried Sam quaking. 'Don't let him hurt me, sir! Don't let him turn me into anything unnatural! My old dad would take on so.' ---the Lord of the Rings I'm reading the Lord of the Rings. The passage above is from the first book. I don't understand the phrase in the last sentence --"take on so". 😣 Thank you for your help.😊Read More...
Got it now.😊 Thank you, David!Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

Grammar

How many stops ( there are) by metro?Read More...
Hello, Ramadan—Would you like to ask a grammar question? If so, please tell us what you would like to ask. Please see our Guidelines page for information on how to ask a question here and title a query properly. Thank you. If your question is whether "there" or "are" should come first in that question, "are" should: "How many stops are there by metro?" In English, we use subject-auxiliary inversion in root questions (not in embedded questions).Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

with

I saw this sentence when helping a kid with his homework, " I will succeed with full of confidence." Since l have never seen "with" used in this way, I find it very strange and doubt if the sentence is correct. Thanks in advance for your help and hope everybody is fine and happy.😊Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, The sentence above is incorrect because prepositions are followed by nouns, and "full" is an adjective. The sentence would become grammatical if "with" were followed by a noun phrase using, for example, the noun "confidence": - I will succeed with a lot of confidence. - I will succeed with more confidence.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

'bear in mind' that vs 'take <it> for granted that'

Hello, everyone, In the sentence, "Bear(take) in mind that some children will need help." 'it' between 'bear, take' and 'in' is optional or essential to delete, while we see 'it' as compulsory (as a preparatory 'it') in the pattern of 'take it for granted that'. Are the two consrructions different each other? Would appreciate on your valuable opinions.Read More...
Hi, David, Only right now did I find your reply and really appreciate on your additional explanation, which I like very much.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

..all but....

What does "all but" mean in the sentence below? Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison all but admitted Thursday that his country had asked UK negotiators to exclude particular climate commitments from a free trade deal agreed in principle in June. https://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/09/business/australia-uk-trade-climate-intl/index.htmlRead More...
Yes, and it has two meanings. See: https://www.collinsdictionary....nary/english/all-butRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

do you think...

Hi, What does the sentence mean? "Where do you think you are going?" Does it mean you can't leave here or does it mean I know where you are going and you aren't supposed to go there? Could you give me some examples with context of it? Thank you very much for your help.Read More...
Hi, Kuen, It all depends on context and intonation. Among other things, the sentence above can mean that the speaker doesn't want the person (1) to leave or (2) to go to that place, or (3) is merely asking where the other person is planning to go, or (4) suggesting that they are going the wrong way: (1) Where do you think you are going? You haven't finished your job yet! (2) Where do you think you are going? You are not a member and will not be admitted. (3) Where do you think you are going...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

need

HI, guys, would it be wrong to say "I need that you study", instead of "I need you to study"? Thanks for your kind answer. TRANSLATE with x <input autocomplete="on" id="LanguageMenu_svid" name="LanguageMenu_svid" style="display: none;" type="text" value="en" /> <input autocomplete="on" id="LanguageMenu_textid" name="LanguageMenu_textid" style="display: none;" type="text" /> English Arabic Hebrew Polish Bulgarian Hindi Portuguese Catalan Hmong Daw Romanian Chinese Simplified...Read More...
Hello, Delia Maunás, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I wouldn't say that "I need that you study" is ungrammatical as long as "study" is used in the subjunctive ( I need that he study ). However, "I need you to study" is more more natural and idiomatic. The same observation applies to the verb "want." Note: According to our Guideline 1 , advertising is not allowed on our forum, so will you please kindly delete the reference to translation services that you included in your profile. Thank...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

cheap price

a. cheap price b. low price c. our prices are cheap. d. our prices are low. Are they all correct? How about 'expensive' and 'high'? Thanks!Read More...
Hello, Jordan, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. What do you make of the fact that a price is low or high only relative to the priced thing? No price is inherently low or high. Doesn't that draw your two scales together to the point where they are basically indistinguishable? Let me illustrate this. Seven American dollars is not a low price or a high price in and of itself. $7.00 would normally be considered a high price for a small cup of coffee, for example, but a low price for a bottle...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Noun or noun phrase?

Hi there everyone. "You can pick it up at 4.00 pm." 1 Is 4.00 pm a noun or a noun phrase in the sentence above? Or might it be called something else? 2 Would I be correct if I parsed (hope this is the right term) the sentence above in this way?: The preposition at shows the relationship between the noun/noun phrase, 4.00 pm , and the verb phrase, pick it up . I'm trying to understand how the parts of speech work in sentences and it's really tough even to identify the categories to which...Read More...

Boris Sofman on why it's a small leap from zippy toys to self-drive cars – podcast

1) Elmer Smith: It 's a small leap from 'You lie!' to 'You die!' (https://www.inquirer.com/philly/hp/news_update/20090911_Elmer_Smith__It_s_a_small_leap_from__You_lie___to__You_die__.html) 2) Anki robotics founder Boris Sofman on why it 's a small leap from zippy toys to self-drive cars – podcast (https://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2014/jul/16/anki-robotics-podcast) Q: Is the "it" a dummy/meaningless subject in (1) and (2)? Do the following make sense? Are they both correct? a)...Read More...

Punctuation (quotation marks)

Hello friends on the GE. In the sentence below, are the quotation marks necessary? Amos also brought up a point that " people will help you rather than hurt you. " Also, would a or the be the correct article to use in the context above? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Thank you very much, Gustavo and David. Your explanations have been very helpful and enlightening. I've learnt a lot from this. Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post

Using less than for sizes

Hi there. I hope someone can help me with this, please. I'm just wondering whether less than can be used with sizes . Let's say there's a small dog sitting a couple of feet away from me. Then I see a woman walking her dog and it's even smaller than the one sitting near me. I know I could say, " That dog is smaller than this one. " But, would I be correct if I said, "That dog is of a size that is less than this one." Thank you very much for entertaining this question.Read More...
Hi, David! Thanks for replying. I like the way you put it-- cumbersome and unnatural, but correct . That's so cool! I totally agree with you. Thank you for rephrasing that for me. I remember learning somewhere that it's absolutely wrong to use lesser than as a comparison; that these two words should never be placed side-by-side in a sentence. Can I have your opinion on this? Many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post

Adjunct: in quite

1. What we gained in comfort, we sacrificed in quiet. Context: With no air-conditioning, we had little choice but to sleep with the windows open at night, trying to cool the sweltering apartment. What we gained in comfort, we sacrificed in quiet. In those days, Fifty-Third Street was a hub of late-night activity, a thoroughfare for cruising lowriders with unmuffled tailpipes. https://pubhtml5.com/hmeo/hwvb/basic/101-150 I understand that part of the sentence is fronted; the original version...Read More...
Hi, Robby zhu, Please note that the title: Adjunct: in quite should be: Adjunct: in quiet Yes, your paraphrase is correct. Fronting the nominal relative functioning as direct object is useful to mark the contrast and to reinforce the parallelism: gain in comfort / loss in quiet No. The preposition "in" can be understood as "in the field of," or "in terms of." All the positive things the speakers gained as far as comfort was concerned, they lost in terms of quietness. The noise generated by...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Punctuation

Hi, which is correct: 1-He said, "I will watch the match". 2-He said, "I will watch the match." I think (2) is correct.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, Yes, 2 is correct. When there is an entire sentence in quotation marks, the terminal punctuation should be placed inside the quotes. Fowler has a very good comment on this point. He says (page: 647): "The quoted words may be a complete sentence which ends at the same point as the main sentence: He said curtly,' It cannot be done.' Logically, two full points would be required, one inside the quotation mark belonging to the quoted sentence, and one outside belonging to the main...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

sent him ‘flying’

Hello, everyone, In “ The drunk driver struck the pedestrian in the crosswalk and sent him flying .” I‘m very curious to know the grammatical function of ’ flying ’ especially. For this pattern - ‘ send someone/something flying ’ I parse as follows; 1. ‘flying’ is a complement for the object ‘him’. 2. the verb - ‘send’ might act similarly as ‘get’ in the pattern - ‘get something -ing’ (=make somebody/something start -ing, as in “ Sadly we can't get the clock going ”, where this ‘get’ is a...Read More...
Hi, Deepcosmos, I completely agree with you. From 'LDOCE': - S end somebody / something flying, sprawling, reeling etc to make someone or something move quickly through the air or across something.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

gerund as indirect object

I saw this sentence in a grammar video and I don't understand how the gerund "fishing" could be an indirect object. I thought there had to be an object before there could be an indirect object. Thanks. She takes fishing seriously.Read More...
Hi, Clueless, There, the gerund "fishing" is a noun and functions as a direct object.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

...has endorsed... to....

Why after the first l "to", the sentence below doesn't use a "verb", instead a noun, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney ? Was Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney endorsed by Donald Trump? Former President Donald Trump has endorsed a Republican primary challenger to Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, a vocal critic of the former president who voted to impeach him earlier this year. https://edition.cnn.com/2021/09/09/politics/trump-endorses-harriet-hageman-cheney-challenger/index.htmlRead More...

noun phrases

Looking up at the night sky, you will probably notice that it is all one color: a black blanket studded with stars and the appearance of the moon . Is <the appearance> also the object of the preposition <with> like stars? <stars> and <the appearance> are juxtaposed? Could you help me in analyzing this structure? Thank you in advanceRead More...
I agree with you that the sentence is not well written. Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post
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