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What is this error called?

Hi - the sentence, 'Delicious crepe, fluffy omelets, or even stuffy sandwiches, this multipurpose pan can prepare all of it for you.' is wrong, as far as I know. It should ideally be written this way - Delicious crepe, fluffy omelets, or even stuffy sandwiches, you can make them all with this multipurpose pan. What is this error called?Read More...
Although in my initial reply I spoke about a preposed object, all of the sentences we are dealing with are actually examples of dislocation , typical of a relatively informal style (mainly oral narrative), where an extra noun phrase is located to the left or right of the main part of the clause, as explained by Huddleston and Pullum in their "A Student's Introduction to English Grammar": The sentence above is a case where the dislocated noun phrase "delicious crepes, fluffly omelets, or even...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

to call him or her on it

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, PP 81-82 "In order to develop trust within your team you must establish a code of honor. A code of honor is a set of simple rules that everyone is committed to playing by. If you are in the early stages of putting together a team, it is beneficial to let the team develop the code. If you bring in a team member after the code has been devel- oped, then the new member must agree to play by the rules or...Read More...
Crystal clear! Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

sentence

Is this sentence correct ? These three cars pulled up in front of the restaurant .Read More...
Hi, ilko, I see that you have tried to act upon Gustavo's advice about choosing a suitable title, but, unfortunately, this one 'sentence' is worse than the first 'grammar'. The idea is to choose a specific title relating to your question. Here, for example, you could have easily chosen 'pull up' as a title. Yes, this sentence is grammatically correct. See: https://dictionary.cambridge.o...nary/english/pull-upRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Choose

1) we will be transferred ( on - on - by - with) an air conditioned vehicle.Read More...
Hi, Muhammad—Please use a meaningful title when starting threads. The command "Choose" is not a suitable title for any thread that is not about the verb "choose." The title should indicate what the thread is about. Regarding your question, you have used "on" twice in the answer choices (and failed to capitalize "We"). Was one of the "on"s supposed to be "in"? That would be my choice: "We will be transferred in an air-conditioned vehicle."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

compare ?

Hi, From The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith, P 78. "Let’s compare dollars to fish. Would a fisherman catch more fish if he had two lines in the water? Of course. There is a greater possibility that he would. What if he had five lines in the water? It’s easy to see that the more lines he has in the water, the more fish he has the possibility of catching. Money is like that. The more sources of income you can develop, the more likely it is you will...Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Pro shop

Hi "I was shooting in the 70s and decided to become a golf pro. (This was when the Ladies Professional Golf Association was just about to open their headquarters in Daytona Beach.) I applied for the apprentice position working in the pro shop and got it. I think (pro) is the short form for (professsional). If so, did he apply for a job as a player to play or to work in the shop? My understanding of working in the pro shop is that he was selling something but not playing. My question about...Read More...
I see. Thanks a lot. The book cited is The Top Ten Distinctions Between Millionaires and The Middle Class by Keith Smith.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

Capitalization of "legal counsel"

Hello. I'm a new joiner, and I want to ask if the term "legal counsel" must be capitalized or not. In my understanding, a "legal counsel" is a person employed by a company to provide legal advice to their employer, but I've read somewhere that "legal counsel" is also defined as services provided by a person who practices law. In formal writing, should this be written as "Legal Counsel" or "legal counsel"? Thank you.Read More...
Hello, GatsbyinEnglish, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Mainly in BrE, a legal counsel is the director or manager in charge of the legal affairs of a company and, being a title, it should be treated as a proper name and be capitalized. In BrE, anyone practicing law is a lawyer. Thus, we have: - He is a lawyer and was recently appointed as (the) Legal Counsel of XXX Company. In the US, a legal counsel is an attorney (a graduate in law) and, being a common noun, no capitals are required.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

There is vs there are

__ an oven, a microwave and a fridge-freezer in the new apartment. 1) There is 2) There are Which one is correct in formal English? (Source; My Grammar Lab - B1-B2)Read More...
I believe the correct one to use is "There is". "There is an oven, a microwave and a fridge-freezer in the new apartment." I will use "There are" if I will write the statement in this format: "There are oven, microwave and fridge-freezer in the new apartment."Read More...
Last Reply By GatsbyinEnglish · First Unread Post

Capitalization of quoted commands and single words

I'm having trouble deciding how to punctuate and capitalize commands and other single words of dialogue: 1a. When I say "start," I want you to... or 1b. When I say "Start," I want you to... Also, does this need a comma? 2a. Martha and Bill waved their hands, yelling "Stop!" as loudly as possible. 2b. Martha and Bill waved their hands, yelling "stop!" as loudly as possible. Does this need a comma? 3a. He made eye contact, calling out "Taxi!" 3b. He made eye contact, calling out "taxi!" Are...Read More...
Hello, Ian—Sorry for the delay. Your punctuation questions are interesting and remind me of ones asked here a long time ago by a member named Weave. If you search for his threads, you will find plenty of head-scratching issues. I recommend using a capital letter at the beginning of the quoted single-word command, since each single-word command is a single-word sentence, and sentences, as you know, conventionally begin with a capital letter. I like it that you have not used commas before the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

You would think he is a good father

Consider these sentences, please: 1) You would think he is a good father, but he isn't. 2) You would think he owns the place, from the way he talks! (he doesn't own) Can I replace the indicative verbs in 1) and 2) with their corresponding subjunctive forms, with no change in meaning? 3) You would think he was a good father, but he isn't. 4) You would think he owned the place, from the way he talks! (he doesn't own)Read More...
Hi, Language learner, The sentences above refer to the present. "was" and "owned" are not unreal but real past: 3) You would think he was a good father, but he wasn't . 4) You would think he owned the place, from the way he talked ! ( but he didn't )Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

tautology

Hi, there I am having trouble with a sentence. A colleague sys it is tautology. I would welcome and ways to edit it so it reads better. "The paragraph (for context) reads as follows: The ambulance is met at the emergency room by a team of Medical Workers. There is a rush to action. Each having their own job to do.Medical Workers care for military members and their families." The sentence, "Each having their own job to do," sounds awkward to me. Is it an example of tautology? How could I edit...Read More...
Hello, JenD, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I wonder why you capitalize "Medical Workers." I also wonder if an ambulance can be met at the emergency room -- I'd say it is met at the emergency gate, and those on the ambulance are taken into the emergency room. I wouldn't say it is redundant, but there needs to be some linking because "each having their own job to do" cannot stand alone: - There is a rush to action, each having their own job to do.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Who had it?

Hi, "I would sell a couple of kegs, make $100 in a few hours, and then take the rest of the day off to go to the beach. I had one customer who would buy ten kegs at a time, so every few weeks, when he’d order, I’d make $500 in a day and take the rest of the week off to play and have fun! Boy, was I stupid! I was stupid for two reasons. One, because I could have made a lot more money back then, and two, I thought it was going to last. It didn’t. After a few months, the price of Freon had...Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

fell down his chair

Is this sentence correct: 1) The old man fell down his chair, dead. Does it mean he was dead when he fell or that he died as a result of the fall? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, David, Prepositions.... Different languages, different viewpoints.... He fell off the wall He fell down the stairs I didn't know that! Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

are in some form of sales?

Hi, It has been said that over 90 percent of people who make more than $100,000 a year are in some form of sales . I believe this is true. All of my multimillionaire friends and mentors work for profits. Not one of them works for wages. What does the highlighted part mean? Please rephrase the statement to be easy for me to understand. ThanksRead More...
Yes, the text you quoted seems to be encouraging entrepeneurship.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Associate with or Associate yourself with.

Do we need to add 'yourself/myself' when using 'associate' in a sentence? Does it change the meaning of the sentence? For example: - Don't associate with people below your standard./ I don't associate with criminals. - Don't associate yourself with people below your standard./ I don't associate myself with criminals.Read More...
What I said is that "associate oneself with" can also be used to mean "adhere to" or "support" (and this is when the object is not a person but a thing, as you can see in the examples), so the sentences above, using "associate (oneself) with somebody ," mean the same thing.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

grammar

Is this sentence correct, “I hope there to be mutual understanding”Read More...
Yes, you are quite right. I would like to add that this style is particularly common in business letters and it is like a polite order. In fact, the period attracted my attention when I was reading your enlightening response but l didn't realize your intended meaning then. Maybe that's because I have never used this style before or because I am an old-fashioned person.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

We had found a niche in the industry

hi, "I resisted at first, but after a month or so I de- cided to give it a try because we were already selling ten futons for every one bedroom set and daybed. Guess what? We had found a niche in the industry and our income went up again! We were earning about $100,000 a year." Does the highlighted part mean (We had found what we were looking for in the industry)? What does (industry) mean here? ThanksRead More...
Definition of "industry" according to the Longman dictionary: business that produce s a particular type of thing or provide s a particular service Apparently nobody had thought of selling futons before, and by doing so the author found a niche in the furniture industry .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

on the left / to the left?

If I am standing opposite to five people in which order are arranged from left to right: "Mary -> Sara -> Tom -> John -> Mat". Can I say: 1 Mary is on the left of John. 2 Mary is on the left side of John. 3 Mary is on the left hand side of John. 4 Mary is to the left of John. 5 Mary is to the left side of John. 6 Mary is to the left hand side of John. Thanks!Read More...
Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By Kimconu · First Unread Post

nice truck?

hi "Going to the auction each week, I came to know a man who owned a used-furniture store. He drove nice trucks , owned a boat, and lived in a big house on several acres of land." What does (nice) mean here? What are the other adjectives that can be used instead of (nice) yet still serve the same intended meaning? In my opinion it has a close meaning to (good) but not (beautiful). What do you think?Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post

My nerves couldn’t handle it

Hi, "I took the PGA test for my pro card a couple of times but never broke 80. My nerves couldn’t handle it . So I set my sights on being a club pro." What is meant exactly by the highlighted part? In my opinion it is close to mean that he did not accept the result of the test.Read More...
Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By izzylovesyouall · First Unread Post
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