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reach you

May I know whether the sentence below is grammatical? " Please request for receipt if it doesn't reach you'?"Read More...
Hi, Joshua, No, the sentence is not grammatical. Since you haven't said what "it" refers to, I don't know what the sentence means. I'll pretend the sentence doesn't include the "if it doesn't reach you" part. One problem is that the sentence isn't a question, so your punctuation doesn't make sense. But the main problem is the use of " request for receipt ," which doesn't work. You can change the beginning part of the sentence like this: Please request a receipt. Please ask for a receipt.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Passive voice

Hello there, I am new to the forum...so...nice to meet you all. I have a difficulty in trying to convert two sentences from active voice to passive. The sentences are as follows: 1: Everyone believes the actor has had plastic surgery. Is it correct if i say: The actors is believed to have plastic surgery? and 2: They know he sustained third-degree burns in the fire. Is it correct: He is known to have been sustained third-degree burns in the fire? Thanks in advance guys!Read More...
Hello Gustavo and thank you very much; I really appreciate your help!!! Thanks!Read More...
Last Reply By Ioannis Giakalis · First Unread Post

Zero conditional

I was planning a lesson on conditional sentences and I came across a site that talked about types of conditional statement one of which is 'zero conditional.' It says this kind of conditional statement is used to express general truths or scientific facts in which one thing causes another. It also says that the verbs in both the conditional clause and the main clause in the statement should be simple present tense, e.g. 1. If people smoke cigarettes, their health suffers. Then, it says it is...Read More...
Wow! Thank you so much, Mr David. You cleared my doubt. Thanks so much. I'm so sorry for not providing the link to the site. I'd wanted to, but I thought it might not be considered proper. Here's the link to the site where I got the information from: https://www.grammarly.com/blog/conditional-sentences/ I must commend and appreciate your effort here on GrammarExchange. You don't have least idea how this site is really helping those of us who are ESL learners and teachers.Read More...
Last Reply By Yale Wale · First Unread Post

there's only three people

Hello, Here is a part of an article in TIME magazine. The article was written by the famous parents who raised super kids. My question: Is it acceptable in speaking to use singular “there is” for plural nouns such as “there’s only three people”? ************** “We’d eat at Sizzler and my mom would be like ‘there’s only three people here, there’s not five,’” recalls Anne, noting that the other two sisters would be hiding in the bathroom, ready to take their turn at the all-you-can-eat buffet.Read More...
Hi, Apple, Native speakers rarely use "there is " with plural nouns, but it is very common in informal conversation for native speakers to use "there 's " with plural nouns. Even though "there 's " is short for "there is ," the reduction is important here. It doesn't sound nearly as bad to have lack of plural concord with "there's." Please note that Time has not itself committed the "error." The "error" occurs in quoted speech. Time would also not use "be like" instead of "say."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tea hot / hot tea

Which is correct? 1 I would like my tea hot / hot tea. 2 (a) Do you want your tea hot or cold? (b) Do you want your hot tea or cold tea? ThanksRead More...
Hello, Bear_Bear, (1) can be correct either way, but with a different meaning: 1a. I would like my tea hot : this means that the speaker would like to have the tea he/she usually drinks to be hot on this particular occasion . 1b. I would like my hot tea : this means that the speaker always has his/her tea hot , so he/she is simply asking for his/her hot tea to be served as usual. The presence of "or" in (2) makes (a) the only possible choice. Somebody (possibly the waiter) is asking the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

very much a...

Hi, What is the difference between 'He is a loner' and 'He is very much a loner'? Thanks.Read More...
Hi David, Can I use ' a perfect loner' and ' a perfect gentleman' to mean the same thing as 'very much a longer' and 'very much a gentleman'? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By kuen · First Unread Post

Must or have to?

From the book "Gem" Choose 1-You ....phone him before 3 pm .He won't be available after that (Must-have to-don't have to-hadn't to) 2-You ....phone him now.It's very urgent (Must-have to-dont have to-hadn't to) I think the first is "have to" because there is an outer conditions The second I think it's "must" as it's an individual opinion so it's an adviceRead More...
Thanks 😀Read More...
Last Reply By Ahmed55 · First Unread Post

have been able to do/could do

Hi there, should I use "have been able to do" or "could do" in the following context? Liverpool have just beaten Chelsea by 10-0, which is quite unbelievable. They have done something that no other team have been able to do/could do .Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, In your variation, I recommend using "has done" rather than "did." They have done something that no other team has done . You could even elide "done" and end the sentence with "has." They have done something that no other team has .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

restrictive or nonrestrictive clause?

Restrictive clauses are not set off by commas, and yet we often see commas deployed this way, even in the work of mainstream journalists. This is the lead paragraph in a piece by Ronda Kaysen in today's NY Times: "In the suburbs, homeowners take their lawns seriously. A neighbor, who maintains an impeccable bed of grass in his backyard, once spent a full hour explaining to me how he’d had a sample of his soil analyzed to help him attain optimal growing conditions. He glanced at my backyard...Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, In context you've provided, it makes sense that the relative clause is nonrestrictive. The purpose of the sentence is to illustrate the point made in the previous sentence, that homeowners in the suburbs take their lawns seriously. What shows that this neighbor of the author's takes his lawn seriously? Is it the fact that he maintains an impeccable bed of grass in his backyard, or the fact that he had his soil analyzed to help him attain optimal growing conditions? Both facts...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Let alone

Hello everybody Translating a book, I faced below sentence: "Our society is unrecognizable from fifty years ago, let alone one hundred." What does it want to say simply? Thanks.Read More...
Thank you again, Gustavo, for your kindly and useful helps.Read More...
Last Reply By M.hob · First Unread Post

Past or future

1-Book"my new friend" She wants to know if he ( planned - had planned - was planning - is planning) to go to Turkey the following year. The answer of the book is "was planning " 2-Book "bit by bit" He asks where his uncle(Will travel -travels -was travelling -were travelling) the following week The answer of the book is "will travel " Are these answers ok?of so,why we chose future in the second sentence instead of was travelling?Read More...

so warm-hearted

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if I write the sentence correctly? "Never before have I met so warm-hearted a woman as my mother." Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Coco, I agree with David, and like his versions a lot better. I have to admit that I made an attempt to answer your question some time ago and, having reached some conclusions that seemed absurd, decided to let it rest. The point is that "before" made it sound as if "I" had met his/her own mother just now! Let's compare with a similar sentence (changing "so" to "such" as suggested by David for the sentence not to sound awkward): - Never before have I met such a beautiful girl as Mary...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

was kind to...

Which are correct: 1) He is a kind man to have helped you yesterday. 2) He is a kind man to help you yesterday. 3) He is kind to help you yesterday. 4) He was kind to help you yesterday. 5) He was kind to have helped you yesterday. 6) It was kind of him to help you yesterday. 7) It was kind of him to have helped you yesterday. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

Must /need to

I(need to /must) buy souvenirs for my family while I’m in London next week. What is the right answer in this sentence?Read More...
Hi, Emad Ragheb, I find both alternatives correct. "must" may be more usual, suggesting obligation rather than necessity: it's not that "I" has the necessity of buying souvenirs, but feels under the obligation to do so.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Advantage

I've read these two sentences: 1. One of the many advantages of living in New York is that you can eat out at almost any time of day. 2. What are the advantages to having a holiday in the winter? I wonder when to use "of" and when to use "to". So, Could anyone please help me figure it out? THANKS for your kind help. The first sentence is an example on Longman online dictionary site. The second is from my school text book "New Hello" published by Longman too.Read More...
Good point, Rasha Assem. My understanding is that there is not much difference between "advantages of V-ing" and "advantages to V-ing." In this older thread I had already suggested the possibility of using "advantages to V-ing," but the truth is that "advantages of V-ing" is equally correct. "of" indicates possession, and that is clear in "advantages of V-ing." I can only imagine the use of "to" (which sounds more idiomatic, less transparent to me) as a shortened version of "attached to":...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Tenses

What is the right answer in this sentence :" The fire grew quickly because it...... for many months." (had not rained / was not raining).Read More...
The past continuous is used for actions or states simultaneous with, not previous to, the main verb in the past simple. Also, the "for"-adverbial ( for many months ) requires a perfect tense. Let's see an example with the past continuous: - It was raining when the fire broke out . (There is simultaneity between the rain and the fire outbreak.) - It had been raining for some time when the fire broke out. (Here we can infer that the rain stopped when the fire broke out and thus preceded the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Comma used to separate a relative clause

In "Fowler's Concise Modern English Usage", 3rd Edition, p128.5, on commas, it states: "They are also used to separate a relative clause from what it refers back to when the clause is not a restrictive or identifying one. " Two examples are provided: i) "The book, which was on the table, was a gift. " ii) "The book which was on the table was a gift." "Without the comma, the relative clause would identify the book in question rather than give extra information about it." My question: could...Read More...
Thank you very much, David. I understand it now.Read More...
Last Reply By Philip · First Unread Post

Question

He asks where his uncle ....the following week (Will travel ..travels ..was travelling ...were travelling)Read More...
Hello, Ahmed55, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Please check the test question again. Did you mean to use the present simple ("asks"), or should it have been "asked"? In the future, please use a title descriptive of the grammatical topic. Also, when you ask a question, please ask the question. Don't make us infer it. Thank you. Again, welcome to the forum.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

it/that

1) She will refuse to sign the agreement because that is what her husband wants her to do. 2) She will refuse to sign the agreement because it is what her husband wants her to do. 3) She won't sign the agreement, because that is what her husband wants her to do. 4) She won't sign the agreement, because it is what her husband wants her to do. Can we tell what her husband wants her to do? Does he want her to sign the agreement or to avoid signing it? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, In (1) and (2), "that"/"it" could refer to "refuse to sign the agreement" or to "sign the agreement." However, unless she and her husband are at odds, it is highly unlikely that she would refuse to do something because her husband wants her to do it. Thus, it's natural to assume that her husband wants her to refuse. In (3) and (4), I find it unclear whether her husband wants her to sign or not to sign the agreement. Again, from a pragmatic standpoint, it is more natural to...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

that was in their interest

1) He said they were withdrawing from the deal although that was in their interest. 2) He said they were withdrawing from the deal because that wasn't in their interest. Do these sentences make sense? In them 'that' is supposed to refer to 'the deal'. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, No, the sentences don't make sense. Although I wouldn't want to say that it is grammatically impossible for "that" to refer to "the deal" in those sentences, the natural interpretation of "that" is that it refers to their withdrawing from the deal. The issue with the sentences, then, lies in the semantics. Regarding (1), if withdrawing from the deal was in their interest, and that is what they did, then it doesn't make sense to use "although." Regarding (2), the sentence...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

adverb clauses

Q.I wonder which one is grammatically incorrect or awkward in the following sentences. 1. I felt much better while eating breakfast. 2. I felt much better after eating breakfast. 3. I felt much better because eating breakfast. 4. I felt much better until eating breakfast. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Jiho, It's nice to see you again. Only (1) and (2) are correct, and they have totally different meanings. (3) and (4) are incorrect. "Because" and "until" don't take gerund objects. (There may be exceptions with "until," but none is coming to mind right now.)Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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