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glittering stone

Which is correct? 1 The ring was made of glittering stone. 2 There was a glittering stone on the ring. 3 The ring has a glittering stone. 4 The ring is a glittering stone.Read More...
Hi Vincent, You can use (2) and (3). If you use (1) or (4), the meaning changes, and it sounds as though you mean that the entire ring was formed out of a single stone.Read More...

like what we saw...

Is the sentence correct: 1-"People can go to the extreme like what we saw during the Cultural Revolution" Full sentence: In 2007 Hong Kong Chief Executive Donald Tsang remarked that the Cultural Revolution represented the 'dangers of democracy', remarking "People can go to the extreme like what we saw during the Cultural Revolution [...], when people take everything into their own hands, then you cannot govern the place".[123] The remarks caused controversy in Hong Kong and were later...Read More...
Hi Navi, I think "like what we saw during the Cultural Revolution" is a sentence modifier, that is, it refers to the whole main clause that precedes it. You can replace it by "as we saw...," placed either before or after the main clause and rendering, in my opinion, exactly the same meaning as the original sentence. You can say: "As we saw during the Cultural Revolution, people can go to the extreme," or "People can go to the extreme as we saw during the Cultural Revolution."Read More...

guessed / believed

Can I say, 1 They guesses (that) the ring was belonged to Mdm Lim. 2 They/ believed (that) the ring was belonged to Mdm Lim.Read More...
Hi Vincent, I assume the final S you wrote in 'guesses' was a typo and that you meant to write 'guessed'. You cannot say 'was belonged to', but you can say 'belonged to'. Therefore, the following sentences would be correct: 1 They guesse d (that) the ring belonged to Mdm Lim. 2 They believed (that) the ring belonged to Mdm Lim.Read More...

In / with a plane?

I've read all that's written here in the archive regarding prepositions with means of transport and I know that by plane or on a plane are correct but I still wondering: is it ok to say "I traveled to London with a plane? or I traveled in a plane? or both are wrong? thanks.Read More...
Thanks Amy.Thanks Ahmed. It's clear for me now.Read More...

Plz help me with the correct form

"I hope that I will succeed" Vs " I hoped I would succeed" Vs "I had hoped I (will/would) succeed. What is possible difference in meaning between these three forms. Also in the third sentence is it correct to use will or would , would be a better and. Correct choice.Read More...
I was hesitant to respond to your question, Saikat1. (Amy has ventured forth so: I am unsure whether you understand the difference between: I hope... I hoped... and I had hoped... That is, the difference in meaning between*** the tenses, before we get to the will/would part. ***I'm a modern. I prefer the use of 'between' for comparisons, and 'among' = "situated more or less centrally in relation to several other things, as in, 'among the crowd'."Read More...

fragment - consider revising

Hi friends, The grammar checker says that the sentence below is a fragment (whatever that means!) and that I should revise it: "Although Kamal went down to the beach every day after that, he never met the woman again." Is it? I thought it was a perfectly grammatical sentence (since I'm the one who wrote it!). Kindly tell me what is wrong with it and how I can have it corrected. Thanks. GilbertRead More...
Yeah, yeah...I was right! Hi David, so nice to hear from you. Thank you for confirming that for me! This is so Terminator-like! Yes, I will rise against the machines! Cheers! GilbertRead More...

trainers / sport shoes

Do I say, 1 He bought a pair of trainers. 2 He bought the sport shoes for trainers.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, If you speak British English in whatever country you live in, (1) is fine. "Trainers" refers to shoes of a certain type, I presume. You can use (2), but "trainers" can't refer to shoes in that sentence. It refers instead to people who train other people; you bought the sport(s) shoes for them. Putting the two together, I suppose you could even say, "He bought trainers for trainers."Read More...

I don't know ... but

Hi, There seems to be nothing wrong with (1). (1) I don't know it isn't raining in Chicago, but it may be raining. How about (2) and (3)? (2) I don't know whether it is raining in Chicago, but it may be raining. (3) I don't know it is raining in Chicago, but it may be raining. Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGARead More...
Hello, Seiichi, Only (3) works for me, but I think (1) and (2) would work if "but" were deleted and the comma were changed to a semicolon or a period: (1') I don't know (that) it isn't raining in Chicago. It may be raining there. (2') I don't know whether it is raining in Chicago. It may be raining there. In both (1') and (2'), the second sentence is superfluous, though it may be added for the sake of emphasizing some of what the first clause implies.Read More...

fun educational

Hi, Please tell me if I should insert a comma after the word 'fun', in the sentence below. "It is a fun educational website dedicated to helping you build reading, phonics, or English language skills." If a comma is not required, could you kindly tell me why? Thanks. GilbertRead More...
Hello Gtranslator, I like the way you summarised this. It is very helpful and easy to understand. You've been a great help. Many, many thanks. GilbertRead More...

is ; or

All it takes to disorient most people outdoors _____ a dense mist, a few unplanned turns, or night fall. a. is b. are Are they both correct? Thanks!Read More...
Note that in both: "All that it takes to disorient most people outdoors…" and ""All that you need is a hammer and some nails." "all" is followed by a clause. Look what happens when it is followed by a prepositional phrase: All of the apple pie was eaten. All of the biscuits were eaten. The rule is: With words that indicate portions - such as 'percent of', 'fraction of', 'part of', 'majority of'... some, all, none, remainder etc. ...look at the noun in your 'of' phrase to determine whether to...Read More...

was well written

1-The letter was well written. 2-The letter was written well. Can both these sentences have two meanings? In one case we would have a passive verb and in the other an adjective. a-Someone wrote the letter well. b-The letter was a well-written letter. Gratefully, Navi.Read More...
Thank you very much Amy. I had not even thought of that interpretation and did not think it possible! My question was whether the sentences were ambiguous. In one case we would be talking about a letter that had been written and in the other about the fact of a letter being written. The same ambiguity exists in 'The door was broken' (Had it been broken and was in a broken state or did someone break it?) Consider: 1-The letter was well written by Harry. 2-The letter was written well by Harry.Read More...

who do you think he is?

1. Which do you think is the best way? 2. Which do you think the best way is? 3. Who do you think is he? 4. Who do you think he is? While 2 is not correct, why is 4 correct? Or is 2 correct? Sorry, I meant 3 is incorrect. (May 10) AppleRead More...
Hi, Apple and Amy, The fun just doesn't stop on GE! Like you, Amy, the only sentence I would tend to reject is (3). It does seem grammatical to me, though. The problem, as I see it, is that it derives from a stilted sentence (strike 1) in a confusing way (strike 2). In each of Apple's sentences, the questioned item lies in the clause that is the complement of the verb "think." I represent this below with an empty square in the corresponding positive assertion: 1. You think that □ is the best...Read More...

Does trick here mean life?

"Sea-Fever" I must down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by, And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking, And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking. I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the...Read More...
Trick here is also a job, watch or duty to be performed. Do you agree?Read More...

help to save vs. help save

Hi, Which sentence is correct? A: This measure will help to save lots of money. B: This measure will help save lots of money.Read More...
Both are correct I think. But I think to save is the better English. So A.Read More...

will or is going to ?

He has a lot of experience, he .........get this job. (will/ is going to)Read More...
I was writing a reply to your post on the 'clever boy' one;came back to check something, and mistakenly clicked on this post. No need for me to post re that question. Amy has addressed both, and been more succinct than I, while covering all I would have said. My contribution is twofold: (1) that 'unavoidable' has a negative connotation, and not really appropriate for all situations, as with this one: passing exams. That's why I use the word "inevitable". (2) Your two posts about 'is going...Read More...

which one?

Are both followings correct or not? In the case which one is right? what is the reason? She advised my waiting until tomorrow. She advised me to wait until tomorrowRead More...
very helful with your comments. Thanks sincerly.. ^^Read More...

make / make up

Do I say, He make up / make his bed.Read More...
Bazza has given a very nice answer. I'd just like to note that you need an "s" at the end of "make," bear_bear. "He" is a third-person-singular subject, and "makes" is the third-person-singular-present form of "make." He make s up / make s his bed.Read More...

lunch / for lunch

Which is correct? 1 He is eating for lunch. 2 He is eating lunchRead More...
Thanks for catching that, Bazza. That is definitely what I meant to write. It might have taken me a while to notice that I got the numbers mixed up there. I shall edit the post forthwith.Read More...

help

He is a clever boy, he........pass the Exam. will/is going to plz show the reason for your answer to understandRead More...
Hi, Falcon 15, The way we deal with future tenses in our exams is somehow different from the way native speakers use the future tenses. We mainly use (be) going to + inf when there is a present reality. A present reality means a clear something that's happening now and that can't be denied, not something in your head, i.e. not your ideas or beliefs. The only acceptable answer here in the exam is: will . The above sentence expresses your opinion (your belief), it isn't based on a present...Read More...

when can I use while and when?

.........he was at oxford, he wrote a few poems. while/when/as soon as/ during I know that the answer is when but why while is wrong here. what is the difference between when and while? as I'm confused between them While I was on holiday, I took some great photos. Can I put here when instead of while in the above sentence?Read More...
Right, both while and when are possible in your sentence. One is not better than the other. There isn't a lot of difference in meaning, but rather a difference in nuance in this case. As Gtranslator said, while gives us a sense that the activity took place throughout the time mentioned in the other half of the sentence. The use of when does not give us the same sense of duration. In addition, it is also possible to use as soon as in your first sentence. In that case, the meaning would then...Read More...

Which one is the linking verb and why

A linking verb connects the subject of the verb to the additional information about the subject. Thus what is the linking verb in these sentences. 1. John has washed his hair. 2. The party will be at 2 pm this afternoon. 3. I am glad it is the weekend. 4. I wish I had a pet.Read More...
ThanksRead More...

mouse

It's one small step for mouse, one giant leap for mankind. In the sentence above, the "mouse" doesn't have to be "mice" or "a mouse"? Apple http://rt.com/news/156784-mice-blood-brain-muscle/Read More...
Hi, Apple, As Bazza mentions, the author is copying the phraseology of Armstrong's famous first words from the surface of the moon. Although I haven't clicked on the link, I suspect the author is making fun of the phraseology. Just as you see the need for an article in front of "mouse," so people have seen the need for an article before "man" in the Armstrong quote. Interestingly, Armstrong himself insisted that he had actually used "a" before "man"! Language Log has covered this topic...Read More...

would do or had done

You never help me in kitchen.I wish you....... the washing up. do/have done/had done/would doRead More...
Hi Falcon15, I agree with you. The first statement basically sets the stage for a complaint about the other person's lack of willingness to help in the kitchen and follows that up with a specific complaint about never doing the washing up at any time. And for that "I wish you would do" is quite appropriate. For me, this is clearly the best choice. The use of 'had done' would refer only to a single instance of not doing the washing up, and thus does not tie in very well with the first...Read More...

Which is the action verb in this sentence

Which is the action verb in this sentence and why? I love to watch the sun set. love is a state verb - so not the action verb to watch - is this a verb? sun set - the action verb - or has the action finished. Grateful to know what is the action verb in this sentence Thanks, SusanRead More...
ThanksRead More...
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