All Forum Topics

Question in "past tense" and answer and explanation in "present tense"

Hi there, I have a question. Suppose someone asks me a question in past tense. I also answers in past tense but in explanation can I mix the tenses? Here is the context: John: Subha, did you sign the petition last night saying you want death penalty of the murder of a little child? Me: Yes, I did. I want the parents of the murdered child get justice so I have signed that/signed that. Which tense should I use in the last part?Read More...
DocV, Thanks a lot for your time.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

That/,That

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Which one of the following is/are correct, and why or how? 1. Notice is hereby given that none shall trade with XYZ from this day onward. 2. Notice is hereby given, that none shall trade with XYZ from this day onward. Thanks.Read More...
DocV, I am sincerely sorry for the loss you have suffered. I have met similar fate and it took me four years to get my bearings.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

redundant element

novice
Globally and internationally , the 1990’s stood out as the warmest decade in the history of weather records. It is a good idea to be careful in buying or purchasing magazines from salespersons who may come to your door. In my opinion , I think you are right. In such sentences, there are redundant elements namely "globally/internationally", "purchasing", "in my opinion" (because there are the similar meaning words or phrases in the same sentences), aren't there? If so, why do I often hear...Read More...
(2) She is beautiful, but she isn't attractive. (3) She is attractive, but she isn't beautiful. Both of those sentences are strange, but I'd say that (3) is much stranger than (2). When the predicates are applied to human beings (holistically applied, not just with respect to certain attributes or traits of theirs), there seems to me to be an entailment relation between attractiveness and beauty which does not hold in reverse. It is asymmetrical. That is why I think that there is no...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past participle

novice
Hi, 1. Heard in the next room, her voice is like that of a boy. 2. Having been heard in the next room, her voice is like that one of a boy 3. Hearing in the next room, her voice is like the sound of a boy. 4. Hearing in the next room, her voice is like the one of a boy. Which one is correct? I assume A is correct. It can be revised as: Her voice is heard in the next room. It is like the voice of a boy. Would you mind telling me whether I am right or wrong?Read More...
Gustavo, I agree with everything you say here. I particularly appreciate your explanation of why "from" works better than "in". Novice, you wrote "I assume A is correct". I assume that you meant that you assume that (1) is correct. Your indices are all numbers, so there is no (A). I do appreciate your using indices, though, something that was sorely missing in How to ask for help and thank somebody politely Long lists like that are difficult to address without them. Is there any chance you...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Omission of Subject

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Supposing ‘1’ and '2' are correct, is there a way that ‘3’ can be acceptable? I highly doubt that that might be the case. 1. I read somewhere that if I was worried that the course of action that I was to embark upon/had embarked upon was not the right one, I should do XYZ. 2. I read somewhere that if I was worried that the course of action that I was to embark upon/had embarked upon was not the right one, it would be advisable to do XYZ. 3. I read somewhere that if I was...Read More...
Thanks, David.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

with me

1) Getting drunk ends badly with me. Does this mean: a) I end up badly when I get drunk b) Things end up badly when I get drunk c) People end up badly when they get drunk with me d) People end up badly when they get drunk around me e) Things end up badly when people get drunk around me Gratefully, NaviRead More...

If

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following is from a Youtube documentary titled, History’s Mysteries: Bigfoot and other monsters. It appears within the first minute (and later on again). Link What does the ‘qualified if’ mean? Thanks. PS: I know it is not a strictly grammatical question but one pertaining to usage, yet I need an answer. Kindly consider my request.Read More...
Hi, DocV, It is really nice to hear from you once again, on the new platform. I wonder how I missed to use the quotation marks. Thanks a lot for all that you pointed out in your post, e.g., the misuse of 'real'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

outlet/output

novice
Hi, It's me again. Could you help me to find the word opposite in meaning to "access" in this sentence? The only means of access to the station is through a dark subway. A. arrival B. admission C. outlet D. outputRead More...
Ahmad, As you say: 'Egress' is also an option; however, I am not so sure if it is that commonly used. Phineas Taylor Barnum, a United States politician and showman of the nineteenth century, used to have sideshows at his circuses where various "freaks of nature" and other rarities were shown. There would always be a corridor specially lit up, pointing out where people could go to see the Egress. Since no one had ever seen an Egress before, people would flock to that door, only to find...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

how to use the word "scold"

A native English speaker wrote in her book that the word "scold" is old-fashioned and not used in a situation, for example, where a child has caused some trouble at school and his teacher yelled at him." According to the writer, the child would say, "I got in trouble at school today" rather than "I was scolded at school today." If this is correct, why do we often see newspaper articles in which the word "scold" is used as in the following excerpts. Is there any difference in meaning or...Read More...
Hi, Fujibei: Welcome to the new platform! It's nice to see you again. Please review our policy on the use of quotations and source material. You have referred to an author's views in a book without telling us which author or which book you are talking about, and you have used two article quotations without using quotation punctuation or telling us which articles they are from. Please take this as constructive criticism. My intention is not to scold you. I agree with the author that "scold"...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Usage "simple past" and "present perfect"

Hi there, can you please tell me if I should use "past tense" or "present perfect" in an response to the given question asked in present perfect? Here's the context: Mom: Subha, I am sorry. Someone has broken your watch. Me: What!! who did/has done that? I think simple past sounds better. My grammar book(Practical English Usage written Michael Swan) says that simple past tense is preferable. Look at the third example.Read More...
Hi, Subhaji: I agree with you. Both the simple past and the present perfect are possible and grammatical there, but the simple past works better. This is analogous to the use of the definite article to refer to something that has just been introduced with the indefinite article (e.g., "He bought me a doughnut, and the doughnut was very good"). The present perfect, with its indefinite paste-time reference, works well for introducing a past event. Subsequently, that event will naturally be...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

It's a long time

husseinhassan
Hello, our teacherS, I'd like to say "It's a long time since Ahmed last visited his village." in another way. Could you please, help me choose the correct structure? 1. It IS a long time since Ahmed ( visited / has visited ) his villages. 2. It HAS BEEN a long time since Ahmed ( visited / has visited ) his village. With regard to the new look of GE, Please, tell me how to: 1 . Highlight important words in bold type. 2. Use colours. 3. Search for a specific thread. A bunch of thanks in advance.Read More...
Yes, Hussein. Those features are not available on cell phones.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Please, I need some help with these grammar questions!

1 - What is the function of the noun clause(s) in the following sentence? "Jennifer doesn't believe that Ron was at the office last night and she thinks that he might be cheating on her." a) Object of the clause b) subject of the clause c) object of the preposition d) subject complement 2 - How many clauses are in this sentence? (including the independent clause) "When Jessica feels sad, she likes to listen to sad songs, which somehow helps her feel better." a) 2 b) 3 c) 4 d) 5 3 - What type...Read More...
Hello, Hert009. This is the first time I see you here, so welcome to the Grammar Exchange! I guess you know the meaning of "exchange," don't you? When people exchange ideas, one expresses a view and another either agrees or disagrees. Your post containing ten questions looks very much like an exercise you are supposed to do for homework, am I right? Rather than just give you the answers (and do the homework for you), we would prefer for you to tell us which you think is the right answer to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

The difference between lack, shortage and deficiency

novice
Hi, Would you be kind to tell the difference between 3 words lack, shortage and deficiency? For example, which word is better to fill in the blank in the sentence: The water ______ in this area has resulted in poor crop production. According to Oxford Dictionary, - shortage is a situation where something is not enough for everyone - lack is the state of not having or having not enough something - deficiency is the state of not having or having not enough something that is essential In the...Read More...
Thank you so much. ♥Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

turn on/ turn up

novice
Hi, You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle. A. turned on B. taken up C. turned up D. taken on When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D. Take up st means beginning or starting st such as a job Take on sb/st means deciding to do st or being agree to be responsible for sb/st Which one is the best appropriate in this situation? and What is the difference between take on and take up? Thank you.Read More...
Re: turn on/ turn upRead More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

Seeking your kind assistant.

Hi, Kindly request your assistance to correct this sentence:(The main purpose of the meeting would be update from each sectors on how is going activities and also to update ourselves with our activity remaining budget). Thank you and looking forward of your correcting to this email sentence.Read More...
Hi, Teata: You're new to the forum, so I will help you out with this question of yours; however, it's important for you to know that discussion topics at the Grammar Exchange should concern particular grammatical topics. They should not be requests for editing assistance. Does that make sense to you? That having been said, I recommend the following revision, on the basis of what I think whoever wrote the sentence is probably trying to say: "The main purpose of the meeting would be for each...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Usage of "A" and plural nouns without "any"

Can anyone please tell me if the following sentence sounds right. And have I used the article a correctly? Can I used the plural form photo without any ? John: Hey Subha, did you post photos on Facebook last night? Me: No, I didn't post (any)photos but posted a status. John: Hey Subha, did you post a photo on Facebook last night? Me: No, I didn't post a photo but posted a status .Read More...

controversy/controversies

novice
Hi, Controversy is both countable and uncountable noun but I can't find any example with "controversies" in Oxford Dictionary (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/controversy) Would you be kind to provide some example with "controversies" and tell the difference between controversy and controversies?Read More...
Thank you for putting your heart into your unpaid work like that. ♥Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

pose

novice
Hi, When posed with a complicated mathematical equation, some students seek the assistance of a teacher. A. solved B. presented C. informed D. spaced The given answer is B. However, I suspect that the question is incorrect because something such as a question/a threat/a challenge can be posed but we can't pose a someone. Am I wrong? Thank you.Read More...
Hi David: I forgot to tell you that I had to find a word that has the similar meaning to "posed" from four options. I can't show my gratitude to you because through your explanation, I seem to learn more things than what I ask about.Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

How to ask for help and thank somebody politely

novice
Hi, Could you please suggest some ways to ask for help and thank somebody politely? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, David. When I want to ask someone for help formally and politely (most often in this forum), I often use some structures as below: - Would/Could you do something? - Would you mind doing something? - Would you be kind to do something? When I want to express my gratitude to someone, I often use: - Thank you very much for your help/kindness/explanation - I appreciate your help - It's kind of you to help me. - Many thanks to you. But when I ask too many questions, it seems a little bit...Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

wasn't tall like his brother

1) He wasn't tall as his brother was. 2) He wasn't tall like his brother. Do these sentence mean: a) He was tall but not as tall as his brother. or b) He wasn't as tall as his brother. (Maybe he wasn't tall, and maybe even his brother wasn't tall) Another meaning could be c) His brother was tall but he wasn't. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, Sentence (1) doesn't work, in my opinion. If it is to mean (b), the first "as" can't be omitted, though a speaker might get away with omitting it in informal speech, i.e., in conversation. It should be "wasn't as tall as." Sentence (2) means (c). Now, if you added a comma after "tall" in (1), the sentence would work: " He wasn't tall, as his brother was ." But the meaning would become (c). You would sacrifice the "wasn't as tall as" meaning altogether. ♣Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

only + negation

Which are correct and make sense: 1) He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays. He watches one on Tuesdays as well. 2) He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays. He watches one every other day of the week. He watches a movie every day of the week except on Friday. 3 ) He only doesn't watch a movie on Fridays. He watches one on Tuesdays as well. 4 ) He only doesn't watch a movie on Fridays. He watches one every other day of the week. He watches a movie every day of the week except on Friday. 5)...Read More...
Hello, Navi, The more movies, the better. I find all but (3) -- yes, the red sentence -- to be correct and sensible. What you've done with (1) and (2) is fascinating. The first sentence of each is identical, but the meaning is totally different. In (1), the meaning of "He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays" is that it is not only on Fridays that he watches a movie . In (2), by contrast, the meaning of the same sentence is that it is only on Fridays that he doesn't watch a movie ! The...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Nouns

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Worries are likely to increase under such circumstances. 2. Crimes are likely to increase under such circumstances. 3. Criminals are likely to increase under such circumstances. 4. The number of criminals is likely to increase under such circumstances. 5. The number of worries is likely to increase under such circumstances. I believe ‘3’ is outright incorrect unless ‘increase’ is post modified (which would change the meaning drastically). If I am correct, what explains...Read More...
Hi, Ahmad, I agree with you that (3) is incorrect unless "increase" is post-modified. But if you post-modify it with the prepositional phrase "in number," the meaning will not change drastically. Indeed, the semantics will be parallel to that of the others: (3a) Criminals are likely to increase in number in such circumstances. Or you could say: " There is likely to be an increase in the number of criminals under such circumstances ." I prefer that. I even like (4) better than (3a). My point...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×