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Shore or Coast?

I used to live in a small fishing village on the....... of the Red Sea. a) shore b) coast c) beach I think that 'a' is the correct answer. Am I right?Read More...
Hi, Omar and Ahmed—We can use "shore" or "coast" in reference to the stretch of land where the sea and the land meet. However, "of"-phrases are used differently with the two nouns. I grew up in Santa Barbara, which is on the coast in California. (It is part of coastal California.) If I added an "of"-phrase, I would say "on the coast of California ," NOT " on the coast of the Pacific Ocean ." It is with "shore" that the "of"-phrase refers to the body of water. It would be possible to say, "I...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

as little

a. I gave them as little useful information as possible. Can that sentence be read in two ways? 1. The information I gave them was as little useful as possible. 2, I gave them the least possible amount of useful information. I'd tend to interpret it as meaning (2), but is meaning (1) impossible? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, I don't think the adverb "little" works well with most adjectives: ? This information is little useful. We do say, instead: - This information is hardly useful. - This information is scarcely useful. - This information is barely useful. What we can say, but with a positive meaning, is: - This information is a little useful (= a bit useful, useful to a certain extent).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

If it wasn't going to rain, I would come

At 1 PM: Friend: John, will you come to the party with us? (the party is at night) John: If it wasn't going to rain, I would come. (looking at the weather forecast for the day, which predicts rain at night, and John has utmost faith in the weather forecast) At 3 PM: Friend B: Did anyone ask John about it? 1) Friend: Yes, John said if it wasn't going to rain tonight, he would come with us. 2) Friend: Yes, John said if it hadn't been going to rain tonight, he would have come with us. Q1) Which...Read More...
Hi, Language Learner, Since John is a strong believer in what the weather forecast says, his natural response will be: "I'm afraid I won't because it is going to rain." If he has any doubts about what the weather forecast says, he can use the conditional 'if'. Here, I think the first conditional works better: "If it rains, I won't / am not going to come." In answer to your questions above, using 'were' instead of 'was' would sound better, and you can also use the past simple 'didn't rain'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

to confess to crimes he hadn't committed

a. He was tortured to confess to crimes he hadn't committed. b. He was tortured to make him confess to crimes he hadn't committed. c. He was tortured in order to confess to crimes he hadn't committed. d. He was tortured in order to make him confess to crimes he hadn't committed. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct and meaningful? Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Ahmed, I like your version with "into." I also agree with you that (b) and (d) do not sound right, not only because "them" might be somebody else (as Mehrdad had said in the thread you quoted) but mainly because there is no identity between the subject of the main verb and the subject of the infinitive (the subject needs to be the same to yield the intended meaning). In my opinion, (b) and (d) should be revised as follows (though (b1) and (d1) below would be somewhat cumbersome, even...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Wrinkle ON my shirt.

I want to know how to use 'wrinkle' correctly. 1) My shirt is wrinkled. 2) There are wrinkles on/in my shirt/skin. (should it be 'on' or 'in?') 3) How do I get these wrinkles off/out of my shirt/skin?Read More...

Between, Among or For ?

Hi, I am comparing 2 groups (HIIT groups) with 1 another group (UN) Should I use "between", "among" or "for" ? I read an article encouraging to use "for" instead of "between" or "among" Sentence: Despite the increased ±dT/dt in the HIIT groups, no differences in intrinsic heart rate were observed between/among/for HIIT and UN groups.Read More...
Thank You!Read More...
Last Reply By marcofabri · First Unread Post

such a man

Hello. Which one is correct? Why not the other? Mr Ashraf is (such a- such the) that you can trust him. Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Ahmed Imam Attia—Both sentences are ungrammatical. You cannot say " Mr Ashraf is such a that you can trust him " or " Mr Ashraf is such the that you can trust him ." If you meant to type "man" after the closing parenthesis and before "that," the sentence with "a" would be better than the sentence with "the," but I'd stronly prefer one of these instead: Mr. Ashraf is the kind of man that you can trust. Mr. Ashraf is someone you can trust. Mr. Ashraf is a man to trust.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Where

Success The Psychology of Achievement: A Practical Guide to Unlocking You I don't understand why ' where ' was used in the sentence. Does it means 'by which ' or ' from which ' ? I don't know why 'the parts' is related to where. Could you explain it, please? Wald, however, saw that the important thing was that these bullet holes had not destroyed the planes, and what needed more protection were the areas that were not hit. Those were the parts where , if a plane was struck by a bullet, it...Read More...
Thank you for the explicit reply.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post

Reported Speech

"I will give you your money back tomorrow." A) She promised me to give the money back the next day. B) She promised to give me back the money the next day. I have come across this question on two different websites.Sad to say, neither has the same answer. So, I have to consult.Read More...
Hi, Wael—Both (A) and (B) are grammatical, but (A) is equivalent in meaning to "She promised me that she would give the money back the next day"; it does not tell us to whom she will give the money back or whose money it was.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

except for

Except for the bus coming late , we managed to get there on time . Is this sentence correct ?Read More...
Hi, Ilko, No. For the sentence to make sense, you could say: - In spite of the bus coming late, we managed to get there on time. "Except for" could work in some other context, for example: - Except for the bus coming late, the tour we had planned turned out as expected. (This means that the late arrival of the bus was the only detail that did not meet the speaker's expectations.)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Placeholder

Please kindy accept this placeholder for our meeting that will be held on 1/1/2021. When I say placeholder, does it mean it is tentative only and not 100% certain?thanksRead More...

neither nor

Hello, Neither the students nor the teacher was in the room.(was is correct) Neither the teacher nor the students were in the room. (were is correct) Neither boys were (was) in the room.( either were or was is correct) Neither of the boys were (was) in the room. Neither boy(s) were( was) in the room. My questions: Are my comments in the brackets correct? In sentence 4, should "boys" be "boy" and what about the verb? Singular or plural? What about sentence 5? AppleRead More...
I see. Thank you, ahmed-btmRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

The definite article

Which is right? 1- Progress in industry, agriculture and medicine is due to modern technology. 2- The progress in industry, agriculture and medicine is due to modern technology. I tend to no. 1 as we speak in general, not specifically. What do you think?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed towab, Both sound fine to me. (1) seems to refer to any progress in those areas, while (2) would be equivalent to "the progress ( actually reported ) in industry, agriculture and medicine."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

How to say 4 years and 1/3 of a year?

Let's say I'm trying to say I've been doing this for two and a half years. Well that's just it. But it sounds really weird when I say, two and a third years, even though I'm saying the same thing grammatically. Do I say two and one third years? Do I start hyphenating them? It's so weird.Read More...
Just in case, David, do you agree with me that "two and a third years" is not possible? "Two and one-third years" sounds a little better. Or perhaps you can think of another alternative. Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

adjective

If I say, ' The soup is a popularly traditional dish in the country,' is the use of adverb, 'popularly' instead of ' popular,' wrong? I have another question for the sentence below. I know the phrase, 'in such a relatively short period' sounds right, but can I say like this? How can they establish the building in relatively such a short perio d?Read More...
the part, 'relatively very short ' you explained was awesome. Totally understood, thanks a lot.Read More...
Last Reply By GBLSU · First Unread Post
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