Skip to main content

All Topics

Namely and that are

Are "namely" and "that are" can be used interchangeably in the below sentence and it is grammatically correct.? There are two categories of not for profit organisations, namely or that are charities and other NFP that are not charities e.g. sporting and recreational clubs, community service organisations, cultural and social societies, and professional and business associations. Appreciate if you could shed some lights on this.Read More...
a. Yes, it is necessary. The sentence means: "If you could shed some light on this, I would appreciate it." "Appreciate" is a strongly transitive verb (in this meaning) requiring a direct object. You can't say, "I'd appreciate." b. In the idiomatic expression "shed light on something," "light" is noncount.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

A few of + singular /few of + plural

Have I used the underlined words correctly? 1. You have a few choice for tonight's menus. The choices are Japanese food or Pizza 2. You have few choices for tonight's menus. The choices are Japanese food or PizzaRead More...
"Few of" refers to a small quantity; "a few of" refers to three.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Can only PEOPLE "express" something? Or can an article "express" something?

Just curious about usage. See here: https://join.substack.com/p/are-we-involved-in-something-depraved This CNN piece does express the exact points that Chomsky and others have been making ever since Putin launched his monstrous and hideous and criminal invasion.Read More...
Yes, articles (books, poems, pieces of music, paintings) can express things.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Could "changing" be replaced with "change" here?

See here: The world is aflame with popular uprisings, not least the United States. This careful study of the variety of recent movements, of how movements gain public support and the pitfalls and barriers they face, provides a very valuable guide to those committed to changing the world—a critical necessity today. The person who wrote this is Noam Chomsky; he's a famous linguist, and he originally had "change" instead of "changing", so I replaced "change" with "changing", but I'm not sure...Read More...
To follow up on this good usage note that Ahmed has provided, it's interesting to look at the noun "commitment" and how it is complemented. While it is certainly possible and common for "commitment" to be followed by "to [V-ing]," it is sometimes followed by "to [V]" instead. This is especially true in the collocation "make a commitment to," which signifies the making of promise. In speaking of "those committed to change the world," Chomsky may be said to be referring to those who have made...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Do these two sentences diagram out unambiguously and nicely?

See here: https://join.substack.com/p/humanitys-death-warrant I should note that—on 13 January 2022—I emailed my left-wing friend the following https://join.substack.com/p/humanitys-death-warrant And my left-wing friend wrote—on the same day—this response to meRead More...
The em-dashes here function like emphatic commas or parentheses. The material they contain specifies the time of the e-mail and the response, respectively. It cannot be read in any other way. Thus, there is no ambiguity.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Having had

(1) Having had the house painted, we put it up for sale but then decided to stay. (2) Having the house painted, we put it up for sale. (3) You can't regard anybody running a marathon as having had a bad year from the standpoint of physical illness. Dear Gustavo In three above sentences, we use "having had/having. What is the meaning and difference. Thank you in advance. 🙏Read More...

preposition, 'to'

Their effective freedom depends on actually repecting others' rights to freedom. How could I understand 'to' ? meaning 'about'?Read More...
Hi, Sly, The noun "right" is usually followed by the preposition "to" to indicate what one is entitled to. "Right to freedom" means "right to be free." I'm not sure the plural "rights" works because the right to freedom is a prerogative shared by everyone.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Supplied information

What are the differences between the two sentences below? Are they all grammatically correct and have the same meaning. Based on the supplied information, we believe you are eligible for..... Based on the information that you supplied , we believe you are eligible for.....Read More...
Hi, Tony, In the second sentence, it is clear that "you" supplied the information. In the first one, the information may have been supplied by somebody else.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Without ever having had

1) In the summer of 2009, without ever having had that follow-up talk with top Post management, I left the paper and moved to New York to join The Huffington Post. 2) "We have students who have graduated from high school without ever having had a certified math teacher," Campbell said. Dear Sir What is the meaning "without ever having had" in the above two sentences and Why it is used?Read More...

Can "talked" mean that you texted with the person?

I have a comment in my new piece that says "I talked to my other friend about this issue", but I'm not sure if it's OK for me to say this, since it was a conversation that happened over text messaging.Read More...
I'm just expressing some uncertainty; how confident are you that nobody would allow for the possibility that I texted with my sister?Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

than (what)

Hi, 1. Kim lost more at the races in one day than I earned at my job in a year. (CGEL, p. 1118) 2. Kim lost more at the races in one day than what I earned at my job in a year. I want to know if it is possible and idiomatic to insert an additional "what", as in (2)? Thank you.Read More...
I also read that part in the book, and "... a distinction is to be made between the following constructions: [33] i She apparently liked it more than what we gave her. ii %She apparently liked it more than what we did" but I wasn't sure if it is (i) or (ii) that the sentence in the OP is similar to. With your confirmation, and the data from PEU, now I understand. Thank you, ahmed_btm.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

all or any?

a. There is a ban on selling alcoholic beverages to any minors. b. There is a ban on selling alcoholic beverages to all minors. Which is grammatically correct? Many thanksaRead More...
Hi, Azz—Sentence (a) means that alcoholic beverages can't be sold to anyone who is a minor. Sentence (b) could mean that, but it could alternatively suggest that there are some minors to whom alcoholic beverages can be sold. Compare: There is a ban on selling all minors alcoholic beverages. You can sell such beverages only to some minors.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

to get out of my way

a. I shoved him to get out of my way. b. I shoved him for him to get out of my way. c. I shoved him in order to get out of my way. d. I shoved him in order for him to get out of my way. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? I don't think (c) works, It seems to be saying that I shoved him so that I would get out of my way! Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Azz, Those four examples sound unnatural. I think what is natural to say here is "I shoved him out of my way." If I want to indicate the reason for shoving him, I might say, ''l shoved him to make him get out of my way.'' However, this might need a special context.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

In this sentence, what's the difference in meaning between "has been blocking" and a possible alternative of "has blocked"?

See here: https://join.substack.com/p/whats-our-official-policy People should look at Chomsky’s points and look at Anatol Lieven ’s points—people should understand what the record shows about whether the US has been blocking the opportunities for peace.Read More...
The present perfect continuous.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

originate, the passive form?

Locke originated this theory in the 17th century. This isn't wrong, is it? In that case, can I transformed the 'active' to a passive form? This theory is originated by Locke?Read More...
Hi, Sly, This is grammatically correct. 'Originate' can be used transitively. See here: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/originate Yes, you can, but you need to use 'was' instead of 'is' since 'originate' in your example is in the past simple. BTW, after 'can' you should use the infinitive ('can I transform', not 'can I transformed' ).Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

happen

a. What happened with me and Tom was that we were stopped for speeding. b. What happened with me and the local newspaper was that it received a lot of letters about my article. c. What happened with me and Facebook was that someone made a disparaging post about me and I complained to Facebook about it. Are the above sentences meaningful? I was wondering about how vague the expression 'happen with' was. In (a) it basically means the same as 'happen to'. I am not sure that the other two work.Read More...

declare yourself a church

In the show, I can only see"...declare yourself a church." What does it mean and what is the complete sentence? Thanks.Read More...
It was an add from Ikea. You can see the ikea logo on the bottom if you look closely. The add promoted a store in New Jersey which had lower sales tax than in New York. So you could shop and pay less taxes without having to declare yourself as a church as Gustavo mentionedRead More...
Last Reply By Pieter · First Unread Post

Try + gerund or infinitive

Susan tried ( run) after the pickpocket but although she's a good runner she couldn't catch him. Hello, everyone! Could you help me? My student wrote to run (=made some effort), but the textbook says that we should write running (=experimented, tried smth new). Do you think two options are possible? Or only one?Read More...
Susan tried (run) after the pickpocket but although she's a good runner she couldn't catch him. Idiomatically, when we talk of running after someone in an example like this one, it’s understood that we are doing so in order to catch that person. So when we say that Susan tried to run/running after the pickpocket, we mean that she did so with the intention of catching him; after all, why else would she do it? By running after the pickpocket Susan is effectively endeavouring to catch the...Read More...
Last Reply By billj · First Unread Post

Sales revenue

I often seen people use the word "sales revenue" is it grammatically correct. In my view sales is the same meaning as revenue. For example: The sales revenue h as softened in the last few months. Or the sales has softened in the last few months.Read More...
Hi, Tony C, Yes, and you can look it up in Collins Dictionary. https://www.myaccountingcourse...ionary/sales-revenue I don't know, but the difference between 'sales', 'revenue' and 'sales revenue' has to do with finance (economy), not grammar. See here: https://www.wallstreetmojo.com/revenue-vs-sales/ https://www.myaccountingcourse...ionary/sales-revenue 'Sales' is a plural countable noun here. It should be followed by 'have', not 'has'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

why 'as'

If the camera moves, it does so unnoticeably, calling as little attention to itself as possible. Why is it needed for 'as' of 'calling as'? Is it possible 'as noun as' format?Read More...
Hi, Sly, Yes, it is. You can use a noun between 'as ........as' if the noun is preceded by 'many', 'few', 'much', 'little'. - I have tried to spend as little money as possible. You can also use this form: 'as + adj. + a/an + a countable noun + as'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

on vs when

hi, how can we differentiate between (on) and (when) followed by a gerund..Read More...
Hi, Ibrahim Elmasery, and 'Happy Eid Al-Fitr', 'On' is a preposition that refers to a particular point in time , while ' when' is a conjunction or a time adverbial and its meaning depends on the way you are using it. - When / On seeing a snake, I feel frightened. (This is a regular action, so 'when' sounds the natural one to use). = Every time / Whenever I see a snake, I feel frightened. - On / When seeing the snake, I felt frightened. (This is a unique action, so both are OK .)Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

On my back

Have I used the phrase on my back correctly in the below sentence. Thank you for being my great friend and I consider myself very lucky to have you always on my back .Read More...
I think that maybe it should be something like: "I feel very lucky that you always have my back." "I don't like my boss. He is always on my back." = He is always criticizing me.Read More...
Last Reply By TheParser · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×