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Subject

What is the subject of this sentences? Is it correct to write " There remain " or " there remains"? There remain many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries. ThanksRead More...
Yes, it is correct. "there" is a grammatical subject. The real subject is "many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries." Since the real subject is too long: - Many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries remain . we can use the anticipatory subject "there" or we can split the subject: - Many reasons remain for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries. We use "remain" (not "remains") because the subject is plural...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

One of the other

Is it true to use "One of the other" in sentences? Can we use "One of the another" or " One of the others" instead? ThanksRead More...
Because " the " is definite and " an other" is indefinite. "the another + noun" is as incorrect as "the a/n + noun": - the boy - a boy - NOT the a boy - the other boy - another boy - NOT the another boyRead More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Apposite

How A can be converted to B? A. Inbreeding is mating between closely related individuals. The extreme condition is self fertilization , which occurs in many plants and some animals. B. Inbreeding is mating between closely related individuals, the extreme condition being self fertilization , which occurs in many plants and some animals.Read More...
Thanks for our help.Read More...
Last Reply By youri · First Unread Post

Which year to associate with "New Year's Eve"?

Does one use the year of which NYE is the last day, or the year of which it is the eve? For example - December 31st, 2019 is New Year's Eve 2019 or New Year's Eve 2020?!? I'm thinking it's the latter, but it gave me pause for thought... Thanks!Read More...
Well, that comma between "Eve" and "2019" makes a big difference.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Usage of article After "a kind of"

Greetings! Sentence: It's a kind of a moderate rebuke to the president, but it won't - as Senator Graham says it won't - it won't stop operations. From: NPR Is there any difference if I drop that article"a"? Because I have read similar phrases like: - A kind of material - A kind of hobby Usually, there isn't an article after "a kind of", no matter whether the noun that follows is count or uncount.Read More...
Great! My doubt has totally been dispelled!Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

If / provided

Provided/if that woman refused to lend us the money, we would borrow some money from the bank. I think both are right with a little difference in meaning. The author's suggested answer is "provided," but I think both are right. What do you think? Thanks in advance!Read More...
I totally agree. Just like "as long as" and "on condition that," "provided (that)" introduces conditions of a different kind. While "if" introduces conditions of a circumstantial kind (usually enabling the use of "in case" or "in the event that" in its place), "provided (that)" introduces conditions of an obligatory nature (i.e. requirements). Compare: - If (= In case / In the event that) that woman refused to lend us the money, we would borrow some money from the bank. (If that were to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I wonder

I am confused about the usage of "I wonder". Among well-known dictionaries, only Oxford Learner's Dictionary use "I wonder if/whether ..." without a question mark at the end of a sentence. Please note that the meaning is: a polite way of asking someone for something (NOT to think about something because you want to know more facts or details about it. In this case, we don't need a question mark, and hopefully, there is a consensus about that.) What's the reason behind this difference? It...Read More...
Right.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammar

Can anyone tell me whether or not my sentence is grammatically correct? Your parents would be disappointed to see you like that.Read More...
Your parents would be disappointed to see you like that . This sentence is perfect as it is, and it means that "Your parents would be disappointed If they saw you like that." It's a piece of advice for someone to change his/her behavior.Read More...
Last Reply By Muh1994 · First Unread Post

placement of "until" and "into"

I have made up version a of the questions below. (1a) Until what time does the mall open tonight? (1b) What time does the mall open until tonight? (my friends' suggestion) (2a) In to which basket are you going to put your laundry? (2b) Which basket are you going to put your laundry into ? (my friends' suggestion" My non-native English speaking friends think it's grammatically wrong to start a question with a preposition. Who is correct? Thank you very much for your time and help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, You can have the prepositional phrase in either position. However, both sentences are incorrect. "Open" needs to be changed to "stay open" or something equivalent. The store doesn't open until that time, i.e., continuously perform the action of opening until that time. Rather, it remains open till then; then it closes. You can say: (1c) Until what time does the mall stay open tonight? (1d) What time does the mall stay open until tonight? Both sentences are correct. They're...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

when I [woke up/have woken up] ... I [heard/have heard]...

I have made up (1a) below. (1a) Over the last three days , when I woke up in the morning , I heard a very scary sound from the outside. However, this morning, the sound was gone. Since then, it has been very quiet. (1b) Over the last three days , when I have woken up in the morning , I have heard a very scary sound from the outside. However, this morning, the sound was gone. Since then, it has been very quiet. Some of my non-native English speaking friends think revised my first sentence to...Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Your friends did well to revise (1a) to (1b). "Over the last three days" specifies a time period leading up to the present. During this time period leading up to the present, an event has recurred. The present perfect is needed. If you want to use the past tense, you can change "last" to "previous" and "this morning" to "that morning": (1c) Over the previous three days, when I woke up in the morning, I heard a very scary sound from the outside. However, that morning , the sound...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

correct word order: [sell] [my watch] [to you] for $100

I have made up different versions of the sentence below. (1a) I will sell you my watch for $100. (1b) I will sell my watch to you for $100. (1c) I will sell my watch for $100 to you. My non-native English speaking friends think the first two sentences are correct. We are not sure if the last one is correct or not. Please help me. Thank you very much for your help and time.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, You are right that (1a) and also (1b) show the correct word order ((1a) is more idiomatic). Whenever the typical word order is disrupted, it may be a mistake or, as in (1c), emphatic: (1c') I will sell my watch for $100 to you, not to him.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

difference between 'A and B' and 'A and C'

Hello, I have a question. I want to compare B with A. And I want to compare C with A. I expressed it as follows: " difference between A and B and A and C " is this correct expression in English formally? There are too many 'and', so I feel awkward. I'd appreciate it if you could let me know.Read More...
Hello, NVDDM, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. At the very least, you should add a comma after "B" to separate the two comparative sets: the difference between A and B, and A and C You could also reuse "between" before the second set and/or add the signals "on the one hand" and "on the other," like this: the difference between A and B, and between A and C the difference between A and B, on the one hand, and (between) A and C, on the otherRead More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

we all have a secret

a. They all have a notebook. b. They have a notebook. Is there one single notebook or does each of them have a notebook? c. They all have a secret. d. They have a secret. Is there one single and shared secret or does each of them have their own secret? Many thanksRead More...

What is the grammatical function of the where-clause

Hello. Sentence: -He is sniffing where Susie has walked. I came up with 2 interpretations: 1, If I understand it to mean: he is sniffing at the place where susan has worked, then where-clause is adverbial. 2, If I understand it to mean: he is sniffing the place where susan has worked, then it's a free relative. What do you think? Thanks in advance. Context: Narrator: Susie is looking for somewhere to hide. Freddy: Ready or not, here I come. Narrator: Freddy is looking for Susie with hiseyes...Read More...
Thank for clarifying the difference. I get it!Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

noun phrase complementation

please can any one tell me the difference between noun complement and post modifier .Iknow that pM is optional and nouncC is necessary but i still have difficulty please see these examples and tell me they are noun complements: that great experience THAT WAS BOTH AMUSING AND INTEESTING .and why these are post modifiers: THE DECISION TO MARY might be intriguing. The fact THAT THE INQUIRY RAISES A NUMBER OF ISSUES should surprise me . please any suggestion can help me .😣Read More...
Hi, Philip, Understanding English Grammar is also the title of a book by Thomas Payne, and it is Payne's Understanding English Grammar , not Kolln and Funk's, that is being referred to in the good article Gustavo found at the website you linked to. As to "gaps," this test only works for finite clausal complements of nouns. If the clause introduced by "that" can be written as a complete independent clause, then it has no gap. If it can't, then it does have one. Thus, in "the news that the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past habits

My grandfather (used to go - went - didn't use to go - is used to be going) jogging every morning, but the doctor has told him it's necessary to be fit. Which one is correct in the sentence?Read More...
That's an interesting perspective: we can pretend that "used to" can be used in more than one form so that we can make it work as other main verbs do with do-support. Another approach is to recognize "used to" as a sort of auxiliary; indeed, it has been called a "semi modal." The fact that some speakers can use it with the inversion of "Used he to smoke?" suggests that it is not a standard main verb. Those who say "used to" should lose its "d" under circumstances of do-support are, whether...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Perfect Progressive Tense

Hi , Happy New Year i am practicing this rule of grammar and i want to write small paragraph " about two friends talking about their weekend plans" Ahmed : Hello fadwa, what are you doing now? Fadwa: i am fine , i have been running for twenty minutes. what about you ? Ahmed:I have been listening my favorite music, that's why I'm really excited Now. Fadwa: i red your Song lyrics , it is so good , i can not believe that words belongs to you. Ahmed:i have been training on writing so much lately...Read More...
Hellos, fadwaMousa, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. The dialogue you wrote contains many mistakes of all kinds (spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, grammar). However, please note that our forum is not intended to provide proofreading services but is instead designed to answer specific doubts about the English language. If you are uncertain about something in particular, you are most welcome to post a new question. Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

A belated "Happy New Year!"

David, Moderator
Dear members, Happy 2020! I'm sorry this New Year's greeting is coming a little late. I nearly didn't start this thread at all. However, it has been a longstanding tradition at the Grammar Exchange to have a New Year's thread, and I don't want this year to be an exception, especially with this year beginning a brand new decade. A good friend of mine, who is also a member of this forum, described 2020 to me as "The Year of Hindsight." I hope he won't mind my mentioning this publicly here. I...Read More...
I would like to express my deep appreciation to all hosts and contributors to this forum. It is really helpful for me. My special thanks to Gustavo, since he always replies to my questions and provides me with his expert opinion. Live long the Grammar Exchange!Read More...
Last Reply By Alexey86 · First Unread Post

Different from vs. different than

"Different than" (comparative) seems to have superseded ". . . from " in general usage in this country. Perhaps the original form was difficult to manage for those new to English. I still prefer the standard use of "from." Is that a lost cause?Read More...
That's news to me. I hear "different from" much more often than "different than."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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