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pronoun or determiner

He is the one whom I like. Please help me understand what 'the one' is in this sentence? If it is a pronoun, then what 'whom' is.Read More...
Hi, MNHD, Both "one" and "whom" are pronouns, but "whom" is a relative pronoun whose antecedent is "the one." "One" substitutes for a noun that must be in the context (for example, "guy"), and "whom" refers to that noun: - He is the guy whom I like ⇒ He is the one whom I like.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Medical terminology -al suffix

Hi! I have a question regarding a few medical terms... basically when do you use the suffix "al" ??? 1. Spine oncology vs Spin al oncology 2. Spine tumor vs. Spin al tumor 3. Oncologic surgery vs. Oncologic al surgery 4. Spine oncological surgery vs. spinal oncological surgery vs. oncological spine surgery vs. other? Is there a grammatically correct way?? I have seen all forms!Read More...
Dear Gustavo, Thank you for your time and explanation!! This was very helpful!Read More...
Last Reply By rafdelag · First Unread Post

Adverbial adjuncts?

I have two questions regarding adverbial adjuncts. The first one is, in the sentence "The report adds that divorce can have both short-term and long-term effects on children " Is "on children" a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverbial adjunct, or is it included in the noun phrase direct object? And if it is an adjunct, what kind of adjunct is it? The second questions is about this sentence: "Three mechanisms are given for the prospective effect of marriage , the main one being that...Read More...
It's nice to hear you are from Argentina. So am I Thank you so much for including the source. That always helps. The Buenos Aires Herald article you have been provided with dates from 1995 and, back in those years, that paper used to be very well written. Even though the author seems to be a native British speaker, I still find the term "mechanism" strange. Notice that at the end the term "processes," which is more suitable in my opinion, is used. I will transcribe the whole paragraph for...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

relative "who"

While reading a passage about adverts on the internet,I came across this sentence " Think about who has written the website. Is it a company who may be trying to sell you something? My question is about using the relative pronoun "who" referring to "a company" How come! thanks in advance.Read More...
Yes. According to Michael Swan 3rd edition, page 519: In British English, singular words like family, team, government, which refer to groups of people, can have either singular or plural verbs and pronouns. The team is/are going to lose. Plural forms are common when the group is seen as a collection of people doing personal things like deciding, hoping or wanting. Singular forms are more common when the group is seen as an impersonal unit. - My firm are wonderful. They do all they can for...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Find

Do these have the same meaning? 1) I find him as an aristocrat. 2) I find him to be aristocratic. Can I use "find" instead of "think" in this following sentence? It would be better if you could show me how to use it in this sentence. ▪ I think he belongs to an aristocratic family.Read More...
Hi, Toaha, Sentence (1) does not sound right. Perhaps you want to say: 3) I consider / regard him as an aristocrat.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Verb tenses with "just now"

I would like to ask about the following sentence : - I felt a sudden pain just now . a ) Is the past in this sentence : unreal past ? b) Is it true that ( just now ) is used with the unreal past ? c) Wouldn't it be better to say : - I'm feeling a sudden pain just now ? OR : - I feel a sudden pain just now ?. Please let me know your comment . Also please tell me why ?. Thank you very much . ahmedRead More...
'Just now' can be used with the present perfect, but this usage isn't included in our exams. In our exams, we either go with the past simple or the present progressive. According to Michael Swan, 3rd edition, page '288': When just now means 'a few moments ago', two positions are possible: a) in end-position, usually with a past tense. - I telephoned Ann just now. b) in mid-position (see 24) with the verb, with a present perfect or past tense. - I ('ve) just now realised what I need to do.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

has been shopping - has gone shopping

Hello. Could you please help me choose the correct answer? Why? - She (has been - has gone) shopping. The apples she has bought are fantastic. I think both are OK. Thank you.Read More...
Would this structure work instead? : Where is your mom? the apples she has bought are fantastic Yes, she's fast asleep now, she has been shopping the whole day Or She's not around, she has gone shopping since morningRead More...
Last Reply By Mc'sbak · First Unread Post

Thou vs Thee for a prayer

RNPCREATIVE
Hi guys, I have written a script and I am having a last minute crisis whether the following line is grammatically correct. The context is a prayer scene, and I am stuck whether it should be 'Thou' or 'Thee'. This is how I have written it: May Thou hold my heart in Thy hands Which I thought was correct. As God, the 'Thou' is the subject doing something to the speaker 'my'. Can anyone validate this? I would be most grateful!Read More...
Thank you David for your prompt and very helpful response.Read More...
Last Reply By RNPCREATIVE · First Unread Post

I am scared/ I have been scared

Hello! Could you tell me which one is correct? I am a little confused about the verb tense after present perfect. 1. He has sensed that I am scared. 2. He has sense that I have been scared.Read More...
Hi, Schianu—(2) is ungrammatical; it should be "has sensed," not "has sense." Apart from that, the "that"-clause can have either tense. The difference in meaning is so negligible here that it is not worth splitting hairs about.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Threshold

What's the meaning of "threshold" in these sentences? 1) Big 12 Conference announces football game cancellation thresholds for 2020. 2)One of the final touches for a football season in a pandemic was the threshold for games being cancelled due to players being out for a positive test or contact tracing. 3) The Big 12 put in bye weeks of its nine-game conference schedule for a reason—if a game receives a no-contest due to the minimum threshold being exhausted, the schedule provides two open...Read More...
Where do these sentences come from, Toaha? Have you checked a dictionary?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

break down

Is this sentence correct ? I have had a car break down on the highway .Read More...
Hi, Ilko—The sentence is correct, except for three things: "breakdown" is one word (assuming you want to use the noun—if you want the phrasal verb, "break down" is OK), the sentence should begin with a capital letter, and there should not be a space separating the final letter from the period.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I want him..

What are the difference in meaning between them? 1. I want him arrested. 2. I want him to get arrested. 3. I want him being arrested.Read More...
Hi, Toaha—"I want him arrested" is most naturally interpreted as meaning the same thing as "I want him to be arrested," though at least one other interpretation (which need not be gone into) is possible. "I want him to get arrested" can mean the same thing as "I want him (to be) arrested"; however, with the "get" passive, there is a slight sense that it will be his fault. Compare: "I want him to get himself arrested ." "I want him being arrested ," while not necessarily ungrammatical, is not...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The use of said amounts to avoid repetition.

Have I used the modified noun "the said amounts" correctly in the sentence below to avoid a repetition of words. In your 2011 and 2012 tax returns, you reported a trust income distribution of $100K and $150K respectively . Provide a breakdown of the trust income source that made up of the said amounts. Million thanks for your help!Read More...
Then, you could say exactly that: - Please provide a breakdown of the said amounts distributed by each trust.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Was standing through/throughout the entire round.

According to a dictionary throughout is used to indicate every part of a place or an object. I'm not sure how to use it when referring to a period of time. Are the following sentences correct: 1) He was standing there throughout the entire round. 2) I was out of the country throughout summer. I posted this very question on another page and the answers were mixed. Some wrote that it should be 'through.' It makes sense since we do say "I slept through the movie/my class."Read More...
You can say " I slept throughout the movie " and " I slept throughout my class ," but not ?? " I slept throughout the alarm "—unless the phrase "the alarm" will be understood in context as referring to a specific alarm that predictably lasts for a certain predictable period of time, like a movie or a class. Normally, "I slept through my alarm" just means that the speaker didn't wake up or get up when his alarm went off. It need not imply that the alarm sounded for the full period of time...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The 1 January 2000 or without the

You contend the two deposits made to you on the 1 January 2000 or 1 January 2000 from XYZ company representing a return of the capital. Should I use the or without the before 1 January 2000?Read More...
Hi, Cristi—The phrase with "the" is ungrammatical. You can either say " on 1 January 2000 " or " on the first day of January in the year two thousand ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

sentential which

1) I didn't stand in front of the window, which was what I was supposed to do. 2) I wasn't standing in front of the window, which was what I was supposed to do. 3) I wasn't standing in front of the window, which was what I was expected to do. Was I supposed to/expected to stand in front of the window or not stand in front of the window? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

Ending>>>>>End

Will it be grammatically correct if I use "end" instead of "ending"? If not, please explain why. ▪ The house was too small for everyone to eat together, so they ate dinner in shifts. First the children, followed by the men, and 𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 with the women.Read More...
Hi, Toaha—The second sentence of that example is not a sentence. It could be integrated with the first, but I would revise the wording of the second sentence, doing away with "ending" without using "end" instead: The house was too small for everyone to eat together, so they ate dinner in shifts—first the children, then the men, and finally the women. The house was too small for everyone to eat together, so they ate dinner in shifts—the children first, followed by the men and then the women.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The total amount of vs Amounts of

Hello, Are the two sentences below the same in meaning? The total amount of $10K comprises of..... and ..... Amounts of 10K comprises of..... and .....Read More...
You don't need to use the plural to refer to the total amount. Actually, "the amounts of $100K" sounds as if you received different amounts of $100K each.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

The use of capital letter

Hello, I am confused as to why the Registered Holders in the following sentence needs to be in capital. e.g. The Trustee must maintain an up-to-date register of all Registered Holders ( the Principal Register") showing: 1. 2. Thanks in advance!Read More...
Yes. You may find "for the purpose of ..." when followed by one specific purpose, for example: "for the purpose of meeting this requirement ..."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post
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