All Forum Topics

author = speaker?

Hi, "In the interpreting situation, on the other hand, both author and addressees are usually present, and interaction and feedback may occur." The word "author " is mentioned above in a different sense i.e. speaker not in the known sense "writer". Is it correct to use it to mean "speaker"?Read More...

States Names?

Hi, Please see the attachment. 1. what does more than most mean? 2. Do those names reflect the nature of the state mentioned? Does "Tennessee" means difficult, or what? Please elaborate on all the states mentioned. 3. As you can see the author mentioned "Kentucky" two times, is a mistake or he aimed at something? 4. What is meant by themed travelRead More...

O' names?

Hi, There are some propers names that start with an "o'" followed by an apostrophe as in O'Brady O'Hare I wonder what the origin of such names and what the "o" means and what the function of the apostrophe is.Read More...

cause

What cause you so unhappy? Am I correctly using 'cause'? Thank youRead More...

change

'I don't like our classroom because it is hot and crowded. I hope we can change to a different room.' Is 'change' here a transitive verb that means 'change our current classroom to a different classroom'? Or is it an intransitive verb that mean "change from being in this classroom to being in a different room'?Read More...

panned

He was panned out after he reached the top of the stair. Am I correctly using 'panned'? Thank youRead More...

Except

Except relating to his job, he would not read anything else from the internet. Am I correctly using 'except'? Thank youRead More...

Adaptation

The movie from the adaptation of the book released on last Friday. Am I correctly using 'adaptation'? Thank youRead More...

set

- Don't let the stain set, or else it will be very difficult to get it off. - Don't let the stain be set, or else it will be very difficult to get it off. I know that "set" can be either a verb or an adjective, but did I use it correctly in the above sentences?Read More...

should/if

-If you have any questions, please give me a call. -Should you have any questions, please give me a call. Can I also say: "If you should have any questions, please give me a call"? Will this make any difference? Thanks!Read More...

coordinating conjunctions

while writing my last posting, I realised I actually had another question. Is it common or grammatically possible for us to combine more than two independent clauses with coordinating conjunctions? It was raining hard, and there was a strong wind, but I didn't feel a thing sitting next to the window.Read More...

comma, it?

Hi, "In translating a reference to a particular date which is important in a particular culture, for example, it may be necessary to explain 'meaning' this date has acquired for members of the source culture." 1. Isn't a must to have a comma after "translating"? 2. I feel the pronoun "it" is not needed. What do you think? 3. I, for one, think this part should be re-worded, right?Read More...

financial

Hello Richard & Rachel, Can I please ask you whether "financial" is pronounced "fai-nan- sh al" or "fai nan ch al"? I've checked many dictionaries, and they all indicate "-shal", but I am pretty sure I hear people pronunce it as a "ch" sound rather than a "sh" sound. Would you mind checking out the below link and seeing if you hear the "ch" sound too? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/financialRead More...

in/at?

- in/at the library - in/at the office - in/at the cinema - in/at the bank - in/at school I've always been uncertain as to whether it should be an "in" or "at" in situations like the above examples. Is there a rule of thumb for it, or are they in fact interchangeable?Read More...

-ed

Hi Rachel/Richard, Please tell me what's the best way to explain the addition of -ed to verbs like bake , love and cycle ( ending with an 'e' )to reflect past action. I'm asking this because an author wrote something like this (not his exact words): '...drop the 'e' from the end of the given verb and add a 'd' to it. ' Thank you for your help. GilbertRead More...

By the time and before

Dear Richard & Rachel Many thanks for your kind and great help. Would you please explain to me with examples the difference between " By the time " and " Before "? I'm waiting for your kind reply. Thank you very much. Sayed N.B : I'm still waiting your reply to my question about " By the time" on the following link: http://thegrammarexchange.info...=389101882#389101882Read More...

are closed

Our offices are closed between December 22 and January 2. Is it okay to say that: Our offices are going to be closed between December 22 and January 2. Our offices will be closed between December 22 and January 2. Thanks a lot!Read More...

On prefixes?

Hi, We say "happy", "unhappy". But we say "sad" but not "unsad". I wonder why some words accept prefixes while some don't.Read More...

nicknames, ph?

Hi, Please see the attachment. 1. I wonder how "Bill" is is "William" though, at least for me, they sound different from each other. In other words, you don't feel it is a short form of "William". Why isn't it "willy", for example. Please give me a general idea on how short names (nicknames) are made for real names though they sometimes look as if there is any relation between the two. Unlike "Ricky" for "Richard". 2. Shouldn't "first" be "second" as "ph" are letters from the second word...Read More...

all the time/times

Hello all, Would you please tell me which of the following sentences are correct? I always thought it should be either 3 or 4 with "time" not "times", but then I just heard Heidi Klum say "time s " in her TV show (too bad I just couldn't tell whether she said "of all times" or "of all the times"). 1. He is one of my favorite designers of all times . 2. He is one of my favorite designers of all the times . 3. He is one of my favorite designers of all time . 4. He is one of my favorite...Read More...

Germanic?

Hi, Does the word "germanic" relate to "Germany" in away or another? Also, when we say "germanic languages", does that mean they come from Germany?Read More...

be caught up on

"Now that Larry is finally caught up on his work, he can start his vacation tomorrow." I saw the above sentence in my grammar book. What does "caught up on" mean here? This sentence just doesn't seem to make any sense to me.Read More...

get sucked in

E: Do you know where I can recruit a good marketer for our industry? F: I will get sucked in. What industry is it that you are in? - "I will get sucked in" means "I will participate", correct? Is it polite to say? Thanks so much to moderators NamcoolguyRead More...

Is my conclusion correct?

Can we add the verb (confirm) to the following group (rumor/allege/say/report) in that they can have the following structures: 1. It is (said/alleged/rumored) that he works in that factory. 2. He is (said/alleged/rumored) to work in that factory. I mean can we say: 1. He is confirmed to be making good progress. 2. It is confirmed that he is making good progress.Read More...
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