Skip to main content

All Forum Topics

suggest

engfan
Hello, He suggests that she borrow a necklace from her friend. Is borrow correct? Can I say borrows too? thanks,Read More...
Thank you so much, Okaasan.Read More...

For/ Because

"Someone must have entered the house during our absence, for the front door lock has been broken." This is not a case of cause and effect. Therefore, "for" is the conjunction of choice -- not "because." Could you please give me some more examples in which "for" is definitely more appropriate? Thank you. Thank you.Read More...
(1) Thank you, Rasha Assem, for your helpful reply. I shall certainly check out Mr. Swan's comments. Thanks so much for your suggestion. (2) Thank you,Seiichi, for those two sentences. I shall use them as my model: (a) The ground is wet because it rained last night (cause and effect). (b) It rained last night, for the ground is wet (gives evidence for the truth of the preceding statement -- as Professors Pence and Emery explain).Read More...

He always asks me what I already know.

Hi Compare (1) and (2). (1) He always asks me what I already know. (2) He always asks me what I know. Do you think (1) sounds strange if it appears in (3)? (3) Mr T's class is boring. He always asks me what I already know. Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGA Downing and Locke say in their English Grammar (p.106) that "He asked me what I knew" can be analysed as meaning "He asked me the things I knew" in the context, for example, of reporting on an examination.Read More...
Hi Seiichi Even with the context you added in (3), sentence (1) strikes me as peculiar. I think you'd have to add more context to justify it. I suppose I might possibly take the intended meaning of sentence (1) to be something like this: Mr T always asks me the same question: "What do you already know?" I hate having to tell him the same things again and again, and I'm never really sure how much he actually wants me to tell him. So, not only is Mr T's class boring, but that question is also...Read More...

Hate

Would you please tell me what is the difference between the following sentences? 1- I hate getting up early. 2- I hate to get up early. ** I would like to know the difference : 1- Grammatically . 2- In meaning . Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
Parallel with the general difference between gerunds and infinitives, which Rachel pointed to, for the case of "hate," "like," "love," and "prefer," you can see New First Certificate by Haines and Stewart: The meaning of the verbs like, prefer, hate , and love changes slightly, depending on whether the gerund or infinitive follows them. 1. The gerund is more usual for general statements when the emphasis is on the enjoyment (or not) of the action. Mary prefers eating out to eating at home.Read More...

If/ Provided that

Would someone please explain when it is more "correct" to use "provided that" instead of "if"? Our beloved master, Mr. Henry Fowler, explains it, but it is difficult for an ordinary fellow like me to understand completely what he is talking about. Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, Rachel and Seiichi, for your very detailed and insightful replies. I shall print them out for careful study.Read More...

convince

cocoricot
Dear teachers, (convince) that they were trying to poison him, he refused to eat anything. Please tell me if it is correct to use "convinced" and it is an adjective ? Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Amy. I am grateful for all your kind help.Read More...

me too or I too

Hi, I would be grateful to know when it is appropriate to use Me too I too Thank you for your assistance. Warmest regards, SusanRead More...
Thank you - this comment is very helpful. Thanks.Read More...

be easy to read

Dear teachers, I understand (A) and (B) are correct. How about (C)? Can it be considered as correct? (A) It is easy to read this book. (B) This book is easy to read. (C) This book is easy to be read.Read More...
And I would just remind you that this is not a general rule, and the passive form is in many cases possible (and sometimes the only correct form). Here's just one example: It is frightening to be left alone in a jungle at night.Read More...

0 stops

Hi all, On TV, I often see this 0 stops, 1 stop, 2 stops in a car race. I would like to know why 0 stops (plural)? Can I say 0 stop (singular)? What I think about this is: 0 means No and after No we can use either singular or plural noun. Am I right? Many thanksRead More...
Great comment, Seiichi Myoga. I think I've heard or read about this before. "One" is treated differently from all other numbers (as it could stand for God). Anyone has anything to add to this?Read More...

Position of adverb

Sometimes, I got confused. Where should I put the adverb correctly? Which is correct? (a) Peter bumped into her accidentally. (b) Peter accidentally bumped into her. (c) Accidently, Peter bumped into her. Anyone can tell me?? Thanks!!Read More...
(a) and (b) are OK. (c) is not really fine.Read More...

that or it?

Dear teachers.. In this little paragraph "Hot air ballooning is usually done in the early morning or late afternoon. That is when there is not much wind." I think that "that" in the second sentence means "hot air ballooning", then isn't it usual to write "it" instead of "that"? What do you think? Thanks in advanceRead More...
Hello, Alexwlh: I think that ‘that is’ could be followed by ‘because’ in certain circumstance, but not frequently. But first, here’s a definition from the American Heritage* for ‘that is,’ which they label as an idiom: • Also, that is to say . To explain more clearly, in other words, as in It's on the first floor, that is, at street level, or We're coming next month, that is to say, in November. With this in mind, you might have a sentence like this: • The reason that Jack doesn’t do well in...Read More...

a certain thing

Look at this: I have two questions. #1 I think we could rewrite this sentence with the verb "is" by using a sentence with the verb "gives." Do you think (i) is a good paraphrase? (i) If the star is present in a film, it gives filmgoers a promise/prospect that they would see a certain thing. What bothers me is the part " a certain kind." If it is " the kind of film you would see," then the writer will expect you to easily imagine the story, developments and ending, for example. You could have...Read More...
Hi Seiichi The word "promise" in your sentence refers to the fact that the knowledge that a particular star is in a movie will cause movie-goers to have certain expectations or will lead movie-goers to expect certain things to be true about the movie. Though the expectations of many movie-goers might be the same or quite similar, it's entirely possible that the expectations of movie-goer A will be quite different from movie-goer B. I would add that, personally, I don't think the original...Read More...

by no means

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Geology is by no means without practical importance in relation to the needs and industries of mankind." I would like to change "by no means" with another word. There are two possibilites: a. hardly at all b. certainly not I think (a) is better. Am I right? Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco If I had to choose one of those options, I'd choose (b). The phrase "by no means" is basically an emphatic way to say "not" in your sentence. It emphasizes that there is not even a slight possibility that geology is without practical importance. By no means = definitely not/absolutely not/certainly not Replacing "by no means" with "hardly at all" would suggest that geology is mostly not without practical importance, but that in some respects, it IS without practical importance. (It...Read More...

Let's v. let me?

Hi, Here is a conversation between two people. A: How much cash do you have? B: Let's see, I have $250. I wonder if it is fine to use let's while I'm speaking about myself instead of let me .Read More...
Very interesting! Thanks a lot.Read More...

till death do you part

Am I right to think that "till death do you part" means "till death, you do part" and "till death parts you"?Read More...
Yes, though I'm not sure about the comma in "till death, you do part." Till death do you part is rather old-fashioned wording but I think it is still kept in some wedding vows -- or at least you will see it in older books or films set back a few years. It means that you vow to remain together as husband and wife until one (or both) of you dies.Read More...

much again

1-I was very excited. 2-I was very much excited. 3-I was excited a lot. 4-I was excited very much. It seems to me that 1 and 2 are correct and that 3 means I was often excited. I have doubts about the last one.Read More...
Hello again, Navi: Sentences 1 and 2 are all right, yes. Sentence 3 is not all right, unless ‘a lot’ is meant to mean ‘very often,’ and this is not clear. Sentence 4 is not all right. There are some interesting and enlightening comments on this topic by Marilyn Martin in these two threads: http://thegrammarexchange.info...271091814#3271091814 http://thegrammarexchange.info...461060783#4461060783Read More...

much

Are these all correct: 1-He beat me up much. 2-He beat me up very much. 3-He beat me up a lot. 4-He beat me up often. I use 3 and 4. I think when we use 3 we can't tell whether we are talking about one occasion or whether we mean the same as sentence 4. I think 1 and 2 are correct and mean the same as 3, but they are not that common (unless the verb is in the negative).Read More...
We wouldn’t say, ‘He beat me up (very) much . We’d say, ‘He beat me up (very) hard. ,’ which would mean ‘very brutally’ in this case. So, Sentences 1 and 2 are not native. If we want to mean ‘frequently,’ we could use ‘a lot’ or ‘often’ as you do in Sentences 3 and 4, which are fine. But, you are correct, Navi, about Sentences 1 and 2 in the negative. They are OK in the negative: ‘He didn’t beat me up (very) much.’ The meaning, though, would be ambiguous. This could mean that he didn’t beat...Read More...

bring about

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if "brings about" is used correctly. "The mining of minerals often brings about the destruction of landscapes and wildlife habitants." Thanks.Read More...
Just a small note about a typo: habitats (not habitants)Read More...

a/each/per

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "The space shuttle can travel at seven miles a/each/per second." Are they correct? Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco You can say "at seven miles a second" or "at seven miles per second".Read More...

sports vs sporting

As I'm not a native speaker, I face difficulty in distinguishing between these two adjectives: (a) sports (b) sporting Would anyone help me in using them?Read More...
They are not much different. They are both adjectives for the noun "sport." There might be, however, some special cases where one is preferred to the other. For example, "sports car" (9153 hits on Google Books) might be more common than "sporting car" (653 hits on Google Books). Besides, we also have "sport" as an adjective: sport Variant: or sports Function: adjective : of, relating to, or suitable for sports especially : styled in a manner suitable for casual or informal wear - sport coats...Read More...

noodle / noodles soup

Can I say, (a) There was a little girl holding a bowl of hot noodles (noodle) soup looking for an empty seat. (b) He is holding a bowl of noodles / noodle. (c) He is holding a bowl of hot noodles / noodle.Read More...
(a) There was a little girl holding a bowl of hot noodle soup looking for an empty seat. Use the singular form of the word 'noodle' when it is used like an adjective and modifies a noun following it. (b) He is holding a bowl of noodles . (c) He is holding a bowl of hot noodles .Read More...

school clinic

What do we call if any pupils got hurt, they will send to a room and teacher would apply some ointment for them. What do we call the room?Read More...
Hi bear_bear I'd call it the nurse's room . Most schools have a school nurse, and I imagine you'd find the word Nurse on the door of the nurse's room in many or most schools here in the US.Read More...

in addition to

Could we use 'in addition to' or 'besides' in connecting two subjects? If so, would the verb follow the nearer subject (proximity) or is it a phrase that should be put between commas (like as well as) so the verb would follow the first subject???? (1) Mona, in addition to my sisters, plays for the national team. (2) Mona in addition to my sisters play for the national team.Read More...
Yes, "in addition to" and "besides" can be used as prepositions to connect words and phrases. (1) is correct. "In addition to my sisters" is a parenthetical phrase and can be safely removed from the sentence, so it doesn't concern the verb.Read More...

help/of help

Which of the below two sentences is correct? 1. It looks like they are not going to be any help. 2. It looks like they are not going to be of any help. Also, is there any difference to say: 3. Hope this helps! AND 4. Hope this is of help!Read More...
(2) is preferred. "Help" can also be used in a way to mean "sb/sth that helps," but, for your question, I would preferably choose (2). An example in which "help" is used to mean "sb/sth that helps" is: You were a great help. (1) could be tweaked this way too: It looks like they are not going to be a help (to us). And about your second question, I don't really see a difference in meaning between (3) and (4). I feel more comfortable with (3) though, maybe because it's shorter.Read More...
×
×
×
×