All Forum Topics

discipline/disciplinary

Hello and I hope everybody's having a great day. Do both discipline and disciplinary work in the sentence below?: My son, Richard, is having a lot of ____________ problems in school. Thanks for the help. GilbertRead More...

tramp on the gas

Hi, I have just read this and never seen it before - I tramp on the gas Is this known to American English - when describing driving. I twist the wheel, tramp on the gas, and pass 2 cars at a time Are you aware of tramp on and what does it mean exactly. Thanks. Cheers, SusanRead More...

I became friends?!

Hi Rachel, http://azargrammar.com/teacherTalk/blog/ I have read the sentence below on the link above. When I was just starting out as a teacher, I became friends with one of the students in my Writing class. I contacted Ms Etten regarding that, thinking that having the word friend in the plural form is a mistake. And suggested something like I became a friend with . Yet, it dawned on me what she said. She told me that I became friends with is correct and sounds more natural to a native...Read More...

at morning

I'm familiar with "at noon" and "at night", but not with "at morning" and "at evening". Are these two acceptable in standard English? AppleRead More...

wouldn't have/ didn't have

cocoricot
Dear teachers 1. I wish I wouldn't have to work tomorrow. 2. I wish I didn't have to work tomorrow. Please explain why the first sentence is not acceptable. Thanks.Read More...

conditional/tenses/somewhere anywhere

Which are correct: 1-He was with me in London and having a good time. But I knew that wherever else he would be , he would still have a good time anyway. 2-He was with me in London and having a good time. But I knew that wherever else he was , he would still have a good time anyway. 3-He was with me in London and having a good time. But I knew that if he was anywhere else , he would still have a good time anyway. 4-He was with me in London and having a good time. But I knew that if he was...Read More...

From now is what matters.

From now is what matters. I've seen the above sentence in a newspaper. "From now" acts looks like a noun phrase and acts as a subject. If the sentence is grammatically correct, is the following possible? From here is difficult. AppleRead More...

Not to mention

Akon: Why do you always come back to this? Lesley: Sorry. I promise not to refer to the matter again. - Instead of saying like Lesley, could I say "I promise not to talk about it again" or "I promise not to mention the matter any more"? Thanks a lot to moderators! namcoolguyRead More...

passive voice

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I've changed this sentence into the passive voice. Please tell me if I am correct. "Our parents often buy new clothes for us before New Year Festival." 1. New clothes are often bought for us by our parents before New Year Festival. 2. We are often bought new clothes for by our parents before New Year Festival. Thanks.Read More...

I've seen better

cocoricot
Dear teachers, What do you think of the film we’ve watched?” A. It’s a breeze! B. No kidding! C. I’ve seen better. D. None of your buisness! The answer is (C) but I don't understand why it is. Is it correct? Thanks.Read More...

at / on / beside the roadside

can I say, (1) On the way to school, Peter saw an old woman walking near / beside / at / on the road. He felt pity for her and went to the woman. (2) After Peter finished his practice, he saw an old woman was by /on / at the roadside. (3) After practising, Peter went back home.While he was walking along the road, he saw an old woman standing by the roadside.Read More...

Who clause?

Hi, I have read: Rule 1: If something or someone is sufficiently identified, the description following it is considered nonessential and should be surrounded by commas. Examples: Freddy, who has a limp, was in an automobile accident. (Freddy is named, so the description of him that immediately follows is not essential.) My Q: What if that person is not sufficiently identified, but the name of the person, in this case Freddy, is already there though. For example: Say, in my village there are...Read More...

About Practise for

Can I say, (e) Last Monday it was the school day. Nadia woke up early and decided to practise in her school. She was excited because that day was having a a hockey tournament. (f) Lasy Monday, Peter went to school early. He was going to practise hockey. He had to practise hard so that he could win in the tournament hockey. (g) She went to school for hockey practice. She wanted to participate in the hockey tournament.It would be held on Tuesday coming soon.Read More...

thankful for his help / for helping

Can I say, (1) The old woman was grateful to Peter and thanked (him) for helping her crossing the road. Later, Peter continued his walk / her way to school. (2) The old woman was grateful and thanked Peter for helping (her) /thanked for helping her. (3) The old woman thanked Peter's help. She praised him as a helpful boy. (4) The old woman praised Peter for his help / helping. (5) The old woman thanked for his kindness. She gave him some money for a reward. (6) She thanked Peter for helping...Read More...

while vs during

(A)We stayed one night in this hotel while visiting Paris. (B) We stayed one night in this hotel during visiting Paris. I understand the sentence (B) is considered as incorrect. I also know "during" is followed by a noun and "while" is by a clause. But in case of (B), if "visiting" is a gerund acting as a noun, why is it incorrect? In addition, how about the following examples? Is it incorrect either? We stayed one night in this hotel during the visiting of Paris.Read More...

much too / very much

In the following sentence, can I use either 'much too kind' or 'very (so) much kind' with the same meaning or implications? 'You shouldn't have bothered, Mrs. Owens; you're much too kind/very (so) much kind to me.' Thanks!Read More...

the

Masks also appear in theater. Dancers and actors often wear them to show the audience the kind of characther that they are playing. Is it okay to write 'audiences' instead of 'the audience': Dancers and actors often wear them to show audiences the kind of characther that they are playing. I don't get it why the writer is using 'the' before audience. Is it wrong not to write 'the' before audience in the sentence?Read More...

would

Sharon : The first Sweden's astronaut returned albeit a bit late. Bart: When you travel millions of miles, twenty minutes late is nothing to fuss over. Sharon : I wonder if this will lead to a surge in space exploration for Sweden. Bart : I don’t see why it would make a tremendous difference. Sweden has always been actively involved in space research. I don't understand "would" in bold. Is the "would" used in hypothetical meaning, or just used in expressing presumption? And could "would" be...Read More...

crawled out / from the hole

Can I say, (a) The dog crawled out from / of the hole (in the gate). (b) The dog crawled through the hole from / in the fence. (c) The dog crawled in / into the hole (in the gate). (d) The dog crawled in / into the house through the hole. (e) The dog crawled over the hole.Read More...

Got a little ahead

- When asked about headlines that suggested the teen got a little ahead of her age by dancing with the metal pole, Billy Ray said Miley remains focused on “entertaining.” “You know what? I just think that Miley loves entertaining people,” Billy Ray told Access. “She loves singing (and) songwriting.” And while some might have taken exception to Miley’s performance, her father encouraged her to block out the negative comments. “I always tell her to love what you’re doing and stay focused for...Read More...

apply

Did you apply ____ the company we saw on the Internet? a. for b. to Are they both correct? Thanks!Read More...

Mistaking

Keith: You are Peter and you're working for Microsoft, right? Jack: I think you must be mistaking me for someone else. - Instead of saying like Jack, are there other ways to say? Thanks very much to moderators! namcoolguyRead More...

out

I think 'out' has a temporal meaning. It seems it means something like 'later'. Is that correct? Is this sentence correct: 1-Six months out, we went to see them. (Meaning: Six months later, we went to see them.)Read More...

out

1-Out this door is the garage. Does this mean that the door opens to the garage? Is the garage necessarily immediately behind the door or could it be some way away?Read More...
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