All Forum Topics

Comma?

Is the comma needed before the word "then" in the following sentence? The student spelled the word correctly, then smiled at his parents.Read More...
Yes, the comma would represent an ellipsis, as well as a pause in the sentence. The ellipsis would be of the word 'and,' coming right after the comma. This 'and' would link 'spelled' and 'smiled' as the compound verbs for the subject 'the student': The student spelled the word correctly, and then smiled at his parents. As you have written the sentence, the ellipsis is fine and the comma is necessary: The student spelled the word correctly, then smiled at his parents.Read More...

sprawling

After 1940's, the houses were sprawling acrossing the borough. Am I correctly using 'sprawling'? Thank youRead More...
The meaning of 'sprawl' is just right, but I'm not sure of the tense without more context. Try the sentence like this: After the 1940s, the houses sprawled across/ were sprawled across the borough. OR By the 1940s, the houses were sprawling across the borough.Read More...

For more

It seems to me once I leave the restaurant that I already plan to go back for more. Am I correctly using 'for more'? Thank youRead More...
Yes, conversationally. The listener(s) must deduce that you mean 'for more good food.' When we say 'for more' at the end of a sentence like this, it refers to more of whatever you were talking about just then, or in this case, what you were thinking about.Read More...

lie

The responsiblity lie on you. Am I correctly using 'lie'? Thank youRead More...
The responsibility lies on you. 'Responsibility' is a singular noun, so of course it needs a singular verb.Read More...

mind

Can you say " her mind was not right because she did have enough sleep that day. Moreover, she had a lot of things that she had to take care of the day before such as shopping at the grocery store and Old Navy'? Thank youRead More...
I tweaked the sentence a bit, Welkins. But, my goodness! Not sleeping and heavy shopping made her mind not right? She is one delicate girl!Read More...

fom which

Are these sentences correct: 1-The weapon was not loaded, from which it emerges that it was not used in the crime. 2-The weapon was not loaded, from which one may conclude that it was not used in the crime.Read More...
This sentence seems correct. You can also say: 3) The weapon was not loaded, which leads one to conclude that it was not used in the crime. 4)The weapon was not loaded, from which it may be concluded that it was not used in the crime.Read More...

Singular / plural

Which singular or plural forms are correct in the sentences? (a) Everyone excels and does /do their best to better himself or herself. (b) Which of the following people work / works in a plane? (c) What will you not see when you go to the football stadium?Read More...
a) ‘Everyone’ always takes a singular verb, even though the word refers to a lot of people. It means’every ONE of the people.’: Everyone excels and does….. b) If you know you are looking for one person, say Which of the following people works . If you are looking for more than one, say, Which of the following people work …. (c) The sentence is not native or even grammatical. The sentence should be this: What won’t you see when you go to the football stadium?Read More...

A few preposition

Can I say, (a) He rears (some) fish in /at the pond. (b) The police patrols at night / at midnight. (c) They are cleaning at /in the compound. (d) He is typing (a letter) on / in / through the computer. (e) He kicked the football in/into the goal. (f) (Eating) vegetables are good for / to health.Read More...
[QUOTE]a) He rears (some) fish in /at the pond. HE RAISES FISH IN THE POND. (b) The police patrols at night / at midnight. THE POLICE PATROL AT NIGHT/ AT MIDNIGHT. (c) They are cleaning at /in the compound. THEY ARE CLEANING THE COMPOUND/ IN THE COMPOUND. (d) He is typing (a letter) on / in / through the computer. ...ON THE COMPUTER. (e) He kicked the football in/into the goal. ...INTO THE GOAL. (In American football, OVER the goalpost.) (f) (Eating) vegetables are good for / to health.Read More...

Mother / grandmother

Do we say, (a) Peter and grandmother / Grandmother went shopping. (b) Mother / The mother took Peter to go to school. =================== (i) (Do we capitalise "G" for "grandmother" in a sentence? Why? ) (ii) (Do we use article "The" for "mother" in a sentence?) Thanks!Read More...
I agree, Grammar Fan, and I'd like to add this: 'Peter and Grandmother went shopping' is typical of a children's story, or a fairy tale. 'Grandmother' can indeed be replaced with a proper name, and so is capitalized. Adults would probably say, 'Peter and his grandmother went shopping.' Here, 'his' indicates the relationship category, not a hame; 'grandmother' is not capitalized. Within the same family, we'd say: Pete and Grandma went shopping.Read More...

with or without "to"

Is it informal or actually ungrammatical to omit "to" and say: 1. "...come see me..." instead of "...come to see me..." 2. "...come join us..." instead of "...come to join us..." 3. "...go see her..." instead of "...go to see her..." 4. '...go check on the babies..." instead of "...go to check on the babies..."Read More...
Thanks a lot, Amy!Read More...

which you will

Which are correct: 1-They will tell you to go out, which you will. 2-They will tell you to go out, which you will do. 3-They told you to go out, which you did. 4-They told you to go out, which you did do.Read More...
Navi, I think these would be more native-sounding with 'and' instead of 'which': 1-They will tell you to go out, and you will. 3-They told you to go out, and you did. These two sentences sound natural. The other combinations of words do not.Read More...

Feast for the eye

She saw the movie on 3D and Imax. It was the feast for the eye with the spectacular speical effect. Am I correctly using 'the feast for the eye'? Thank youRead More...
Yes, you are, Welkins. Actually, there are more entires for 'feast for the eyeS' on Google than for 'feast for the eye.' However, I have always known the phrase as 'feast for the eye' (singular). I think they are both correct. But 'effect' should be plural: effects. Here's the sentence: She saw the movie on 3D and on/in Imax. It was a feast for the eye(s) with spectacular special effects.Read More...

about/on which

Which are correct; 1-There are a few things about which you will need guiding. 2-There are a few things on which you will need guiding. 3-There are a few things where you will need guiding.Read More...
'About which' is the one that sounds right, Navi. The other two are not native. You could also say,'...for which' or 'in which.' But a better word her than 'guiding' would be 'guidance': There are a few things in/ for/ about which you need guidance.Read More...

was

Thinking back of the last year, he said there were a couple of things it was worth mentioned it. Should 'was' be plural because the precedent is plural? Thank youRead More...
Yes. The sentence should be something like this, Welkins: Thinking back about/on the last year, he said that there were a couple of things worth mentioning.Read More...

Important figure

- I think love and be loved are difficult problems to answer because Shane has changed my mind. His appearance made me happier and excited. He has become an important figure in my mind and nothing could replace that. - Are these natural to say? Thanks very much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Well, not exactly. We can't say that 'love and be loved' are problems. The phrase should be 'loving and being loved.' Then, those actions are not problems. Maybe what you want to say, Namcoolguy, is this: Loving and being loved are new situations for me. Shane has changed my mind... I'm not sure that this is what you want to say, or even if it is the best way to say it. But we can't say that loving and being loved are problems to answer.Read More...

being punched/fought

Jay tried to stop the fight and was being punched/fought. Am I correctly using 'punched and fought'? THank youRead More...
ONLY a personal suggestion: (1) It might be helpful to delete "being" and "fought." (2) Perhaps you might consider something like: While trying to stop the fight, Jay was punched. / (More conversational) While he was trying to break up the fight, Jay got punched.Read More...

Me, too/ You, too

If I say to a friend: "I will miss you very much," should s/he reply: "Me, too" or "You, too"? Why? Thank you very much.Read More...
Thank you, Amy and Tony C, for your answers. They were very helpful.Read More...

Semicolon in a question

Hello, How do you write a semicolon within a question? For example, 'Can you send me the document; I need it for tomorrow's appointment?' I know I could write it: 'Can you send me the document? I need it for tomorrow's appointment.' But I want to know if I could write that sentence using a semi-colon. It seems funny to add the question mark at the end of the sentence with the semicolon b/c 'I need it for tomorrow's appointment' is not a question. Thank you as always.Read More...
It doesn't look right to me at all with the semicolon. Why not write the question and put the question mark. Then "I need it..." is a statement after it, so it takes a period. You're right that the question mark at the end of the long sentence with the semicolon in the middle is perplexing. So why write it that way?Read More...

continuous/constant

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "An almost /continual/continuous/constant/ line of traffic was moving at a snail's pace through the town." Would it be "continual" to show the annoyance? Thanks.Read More...
No, you can't use continual here. It means something that is interrupted and then continues. Constant and continuous are almost the same. In fact, I have a bit of difficulty choosing between them here, but I think continuous is better. It means the line of traffic is not breaking (or almost not breaking, actually).Read More...

adjective sequence??

Hi I can't decide on the correct adjective sequence in the following: 1. A brilliant handsome American teacher. or 2. A handsome brilliant American teacher. and 3. A wild dangerous jungle animal. or 4. A dangerous wild jungle animal. The rule says opinion adjectives come before adjectives of size and shape. but I see that (handsome and briliant) are both opinion adjectives and the same is true for (dangerous/wild)?? Any help??Read More...
Thank you all. I really don't have a problem with 1 and 2 at all now, but it is number 3 that still doesn't make sense to me. As Rachel said there is a collocation between "wild" and "animal" so 4 must be the correct sequence.Read More...

Shallow

She is upto page 20th in the book. It is shallow. So far nothing is interesting what the author is written. Can I use 'shallow' to describe a book? Thank youRead More...
This is ONLY a personal observation: The New York Times (which some people consider the most important newspaper in the United States) is thought by many people to be a model of proper English. It regularly hires people to review new books. Those writers have, indeed, described some books as "shallow."Read More...

long / wonderful / great holiday

Can I say, She went on a long / wonderful / great holiday to Europe.Read More...
Do you mean can we use any of those adjectives, Vincent? The answer is, "Yes." She went on a long holiday to Europe. She went on a wonderful holiday to Europe. She went on a great holiday to Europe. Do you mean can we combine the adjectives? Yes, we can: She went on a great, wonderful long holiday to Europe. She went on a wonderful, great long holiday to Europe. She went on a long, great, wonderful holiday to Europe.Read More...

Satisified

David Lee’s shot bounced and bounced again, apparently not satisfied until it met every part of the rim. Is 'satisfied' a verb or adjective in this case? Thank youRead More...
Actually, I see no difference between 'unsatisfied' and 'not satisfied'. As you said, they have the same meaning.Read More...

densely-populated

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Are they correct and are they the same meaning? 1. New York is more desely-populated than Los Angeles. 2. New York is bigger than Los Angeless in population. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Rachel, for your detailed explantion.Read More...
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