All Forum Topics

with whom

Which are correct: 1-I am trying to talk with someone getting in touch with whom seems difficult. 2-I am trying to talk with someone who seems difficult to get in touch with. 3-I am trying to talk with someone with whom it is difficult to get in in touch.Read More...

About "pushed him away / aside"

Can I say, (a) Each of them pushed Peter out of the car. (b) The robbers pushed him into a deep drain. (c) The robbers pushed him to the roadside / pushed him aside / pushed him away.Read More...

in / at / on exhibition

Can I say, (a) There are many books in / at / on the exhibition. (b) There are many painting on the exhibition hall. (c) There are many books in / at the books exhibition.Read More...

About 'which'

Which is the correct answer? (a) Which dress is yours? (b) Which is your dress? (c) Which books is / are yours? (d) Which is / are your books?Read More...

be getting

A: It's ten o'clock! Why are you getting home so late? B: I was stuck in traffic because of the weather. A: Oh, I didn't even know it was that bad outside. Why does speaker A say 'Why are you getting home so late' instead of 'Why did you get home so late? Thanks!Read More...

That

It was natural, therefore, that manufacturers' capital avoided Brundy. What does that function in this sentence?Read More...

Adjective vs. relative clause

Hello, Rachel and Richard: --- The man, rather nervous , opened the letter. [6a] When it follows the subject, as in [6a], [the supplementive adjective clause] is in some respects like a nonrestrictive relative clause (cf 17.22ff): The man, who was nervous , opened the letter. But the adjective clause suggests that the man's nervousness is related to the content of the sentence, whereas the relative clause does not necessarily convey that implication . Quirk, A Comprehensive Grammar of the...Read More...

suggested

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is it correct to use "to" with "suggest"? "I suggested to Bob that he should try the supermarket in the High Street." Thanks.Read More...

look; look like

The design looks ________ . a. simple b. like simple Are they both correct? Thanks!Read More...

will; will be

A: Will you be attending the meeting this evening? B: I _____ . a. will b. will be Are they both correct? Which is preferred? Thanks!Read More...

Bling

Hello, Microsoft has launched a new search engine, called ‘Bing’ on June 3 2009. The new name, ‘Bing’ has come out after $80 million spent in marketing, and the company has used up a catchy slogan, “Bing & Decide”. Bing is shortened for “But It’s Not Google.” Will Bing Bling in the New Market? What does it mean? Thanks!Read More...

comma + complement or full stop?

Hi, 'For communication is always a matter of negotiating some kind of common agreement between the parties in an interaction." If for means something like because , I think there is a missing complement. Thus the 'full stop' should have been a 'comma'. 'For communication is always a matter of negotiating some kind of common agreement between the parties in an interaction,..." What do you think?Read More...

As did not...

As most people rather enjoy the spectacle of a man making a fool of himself the town hall was absolutely jammed on Friday night, half an hour before the usual time for the appearance on the platform of such strolling entertainers as did not know of the impecuniosity of the natives. What does as function in this sentence?Read More...

Is

I bet a dollar to a doughnut that the chance an' the only one -- that every man in this room is simply achin' for, so that he won't look at any other, is the chance to make a lot of money! Where does is belong to in this sentence?Read More...

cohesion and coherence?

Hi, I was reading about cohesion and coherence. And I have come to the conclusion that a coherent text is necessarily a cohesive text but the opposite is not true. Am I right?Read More...

got off / off his car vs house

Can I say, (a) Last Sunday was sunny. Mr Tan was going (out)to work early. He drove his car and got out from /of his house. (b) He drove his car out and then got out to close the gate. (c) Before he drove (his car), he got out and closed the gate. (d) When he got out (of his house), he closed the gate of his house. (e) He drove his car out and got out / off his car and went to closed the gate.Read More...

crucial vs critical

Hello Would you please tell me if crucial and critical are interchangeable in the sentences below and generally interchangeable in all contexts of course both in the sense of " of the greatest importance of the greatest importance" : -Price will be a crucial factor in the success of this new product. -The motif of betrayal and loss is crucial in all these stories. -The President's support is critical ( to this project). Thanks a lotRead More...

possessive

Dear Rachel, Would you please tell me which of the following expressions is correct? 1- The ship arrival. 2- The ship's arrival. Please tell me why? *** By the way , it's said that with word " ship " the two above ways is possible to express possessive . Do you agree? I'm waiting for your kind reply / explanation. Thank you very much. SayedRead More...

Lastly / At last / Finally

Can I say, Lastly / At last / Finally/ Last, the robbers had been arrested by the police. The police returned Peter's car and he thanked them. P/s: How do I use " Lastly / At last / Finally," ? Are there same in meaning?Read More...
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