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Compared to those of animals

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Compared to those of animals, the fossil record for plants is quite catchy." Please tell me if the words in red are used correctly? Is it correct to either omit "of" in "those of" or replace "those" with "that" without omitting "of" and use "of" instead of "for" in "record for"? Thanks.Read More...
"Fossil record" is singular, but of course we are talking about the fossil records of many different animals. I think it would be best if everything were consistent -- plural or singular -- and the same preposition were used: Compared to those of animals, the fossil records of plants are quite patchy . Compared to that of animals, the fossil record of plants is quite patchy .Read More...

sanctuary?

Hello, Some countries, they don't bury their departed loved ones instead they have them cremated, put the ashes in an urn and place it in some kinda small vaults in a building together with other urns. So, what do you call this place? Is it just sanctuary? I am not so sure if this sentence is correct. I visited my departed grandma at the sanctuary. Thanks!Read More...
Good question! In the States the ashes are usually put in an urn for the family and I've seen that people usually take them home. I never knew there was a special place for them or for many urns. The Reverse Dictionary came to the rescue. You can call this a cinerarium or a columbarium . I've never heard of either of these. The first might be easier to guess because it has the same root as incinerate .Read More...

more than not

What does the phrase “than not” in the following passage mean? Is it part of an idiom “more than not”? Some mornings, just after it opens, the library seems to have more people who appear to be homeless, wearing some of their clothes and carrying the rest, than not. AppleRead More...
I think what the writer means here is 'more than not, placed in the sentence this way: Some mornings, just after it opens, the library seems to have more people who appear to be homeless than not , wearing some of their clothes and carrying the rest. However, 'than not' doesn't seem quite right to me here. I'm not sure why. The sentence may be better as: Some mornings, just after it opens, the library seems to have more people who appear to be homeless, wearing some of their clothes and...Read More...

had p.p

The hausband had failed to propose a viable solution to his wife for keeping his motorcycle. Why is the speaker using 'had failed', not 'failed'? Please let me know in detail. Thanks!Read More...
Hello, Jey: This use of the past perfect is describing something that has already happened. It's describing the background of a story. It's not just one event happening before another; it's setting a scene for the story. The Grammar Exchange has recently had a discussion on this very topic: http://thegrammarexchange.info...=317108853#317108853 And, there are a few older postings on this topic. Here's one: http://thegrammarexchange.info...001083483#2001083483 AnnRead More...

than do others

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Some countries receive less rain than do others" Please tell me if "than do others " correct or should it be "than others do" Thanks.Read More...
It is correct. It is an alternate way of saying 'than others do.' Bryan Garner doesn't like it; he says it is an affectation. But 'than do others' is an acceptable variant of 'than others do.' If, however, knowing that some prescriptive grammarians don't like this, just stick to the original construction 'than others do.'Read More...

All the way up to

- My immediate neighborhood is filled with mostly upper-middle class families and singles. Tons of newer BMW's, Infiniti's, and Lexuses. But the entire community ranges from middle class all the way up to the wealthy living in $5+ million dollar houses. - What does "all the way up to" mean in this situation? And by the way the plus here is redundant, right? I think it should be "in $5 million dollar houses" Thanks a lot to Moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Hello, Namcoolguy: We could say 'from middle class to the wealthy,' but 'from middle class all the way up to the wealthy' means that it's a long way from the middle class to the wealthy, and it is all in an 'up' direction. '5 + million-dollar houses' means houses that cost more than five million dollars. The '+' sign = 'plus,' so the houses are worth more than five million dollars.Read More...

They are also a property on the strength of whose name...

Look at the sentence in red. My interpretation is this: I SAY stars are also a property, BECAUSE money can be raised for a film, depending on their name value. Do you agree? Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGA I think stylistically, it should be "They are also a property , on the strength ..." I'd also appreciate it if you could include this in your comments.Read More...

between "more" and "often"

Hi Please help us rewrite (i) so that the two propositions in it are embodied with the same structure. (i) For instance, females are commonly described as using more politeness indicators than males, while men more frequently interrupt women than vice versa.(Naomi Baron, Always On ) I think both (ii) and (iii) will work. (ii) For instance, females are commonly described as using more politeness indicators than males, while men make more interruptions of women than vice versa. (iii) For...Read More...
Dear Rachel I appreciate your help and comments. So the original version was not well-balanced. The book was published by Oxford University Press, and I just thought it could be like that. (i) and (ii) can be used to report the same situation. (i) Dogs often bark. (ii) Many dogs bark. I just wanted a good example sentence that has both the idea of "often" and that of "many" in it. I seem to have picked up the wrong guy as the starting point. We'd appreciate it if you could help us again next...Read More...

Active Verb Forms

Hi there. Happy Tuesday. I'm reading through a short script and was wondering whether what is written is correct in terms of content, terminology and grammar. ( I have highlighted the parts that raise questions in my mind .) "A verb is a word which refers to an action or a state of being. In this lesson, we are going to learn about active verb forms and how they relate to the time of the action or the state they describe. We call this the tense of the verb . We will also be looking at...Read More...
Thank you, Rachel. That is very helpful. I do have a few more questions on this thread that I'll send in soon. Thanks again. GilbertRead More...

Children's books

Dear GE members: I would like to know which books you read as children, which you liked, and which were/ are popular in your countries. I imagine some of these books are translations. Can you name the books for me? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Three-Character Scripture is a really really great book for me to read. But I did not read it in my childhood.Read More...

All things considered

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "All things considered, I'm sure we made the right decision." Please tell me if "considered" is in the past simple". Thanks.Read More...
Yes, in this sentence, 'all things considered' suggests a relation to the present, as you believe, Coco, and as Amy states. The construction, though, is not in itself present. 'Considered' is actually the past participle. The phrase -- an absolute -- could also be 'all things being considered,' or 'all things having been considered.' An absolute is grammatically unattached to any item in the sentence. In this case, it modifies the entire sentence. Here are two threads about the absolute, the...Read More...

anything

Which are correct: 1-I am not the kind of person who would break anything here. 2-I am not the kind of person who would break something here. Does 1 mean that might break some things but I won't break just anything? Does 2 mean I won't break anything whatsoever here? 3-I am not the kind of person who would do any damage here. 4-I am not the kind of person who would do some damage here. Does 3 mean I might do some damage here, but not just any damage? Does 4 mean I won't do any damage...Read More...

Wh questions

Please help me to check about WH - questions. (a) When / How / Why did you finish your assignment so quickly? (b) Which / Where is your favaurite teacher?Read More...
Your questions mean different things. What kind of information are you looking for? These are my guesses about what you might have intended to ask: How did you finish your assignment so quickly? Who is your favorite teacher? (Or, which one is your favorite teacher? Mr. Smith or Mr. Scott? )Read More...

A few prepositions

Can I say, (a) We need to buy crockery for cooking / to cook. (b) We do exercise for healthy / to make us healthy. (c) The bird is feeding its nestlings (on / at its nest). (d) They are hiking (up) the hill / hiking to the top hill. (e) She is carrying a baby in / on her arms. (f) The classes run from Mondays through to Fridays.Read More...
Yes, I'm going to use the word "crockery", can you give me a few examples? Thanks!!Read More...

speaking well in ENglish

Can I say, They teach us how to improve on reading, writing and speaking well in English.Read More...
Hi bear_bear What is the word "well" supposed to modify in your sentence? Is your intended meaning similar to this? - They teach us how to read, write and speak better in English.Read More...

hairy / hairy fruit

Can I say, The rambutans are hairy / hairy fruit.Read More...
Why don't we use "fruit"? I thought Rambutans are same kind of fruit, and we are not talking about different kinds of fruit. It's same like "fish", right? WE should say, Rambutans are hairy fruits. Am I right?Read More...

get/annoy

"Her irresponsible attitude really gets to me" Does "gets to" mean "annoys"? Would it be the same to say ".....attitude really gets me"?Read More...
It's true that 'gets me' can mean 'annoy.' It can also mean 'understand and appreciate.' I love her because she really gets me. Few people do. It's nice to be understood and appreciated.Read More...

not

Are these sentences correct: 1-He didn't like his life, the life that was ahead of him. 2-He didn't like his life, not the life that was ahead of him. 3-He didn't like his life, not the life that was ahead of him, but the one he had had until then. I think 1 and 2 mean the same. Obviously 3 means something quite different. My problem is with 2. Can't it actually mean two things? a-He didn't like the life that was ahead of him. b-He disliked his life, but not the one that was ahead of him. If...Read More...
I think (2) should be interpreted to mean (3), not (1). Sentence (2) might be informally used to mean (a), but I think it onlys means (b). He didn't like his life, but not the life that was ahead of him.Read More...

has a lot of juice in her

Hello, I think the phrase at the bottom expresses a sarcastic remark to me. I am just curious what you guys will say on this. Houston’s trademark song, “I Will Always Love You,” was performed at the end, and she definitely did not disappoint. Loud cheers from the audience didn’t stop for several minutes. Houston successfully wrapped up the concert by throwing kisses after singing an encore. It’s already been three decades since Houston entered showbiz. There’s no doubt about it. She’s still...Read More...
I don't think it's a sarcastic remark, Iwtk. The facts presented here by the writer all indicate his/her positive attitude toward Houston. What makes you think it is sarcastic?!Read More...

GE members in Chile

My deepest sympathies to the people of Chile on the loss of life and property in the recent earthquake. If there are any members on the GE from Chile, please accept my deepest condolences. We here in Malaysia are one with you in hope and prayer that you will have the strength and courage to get through this very difficult time. God bless you all. GilbertRead More...
May God bless them all!Read More...
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