All Forum Topics

Miss the most

- The person who James miss the most when studying away from home is his sister. However, whenever he's home, his mother is very tired of arguments between him and his sister. - Are these sentences grammatical? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
The sentences are good, Namcoolguy, except that I think there is a typo: 'miss' should be 'misses.' It's the verb that goes with 'James.' Maybe you are wondering about the third word, 'who.' Maybe you think it should be 'whom.' It could be 'whom' as the object of 'misses' in the adjective clause; however, 'who' in place of 'whom' is acceptable in most instances these days. Maybe you are wondering about the pronoun 'him' towards the end. 'Him' is correct because it is the object of the...Read More...

turn up / down the fan

How do we say if I had already switched on the fan, I want to "turn up" the number from 1 to 4 ? Dialogue A: Today is very hot, please turn up the speed of the fan. / please turn the number 4. B: Ok, I will. ==================== How do we say If I want to lower down the speed of the fan? from 4 to 1? Dialogue A: Today is cold, please turn down to number 1 for the fan. B: Yes. ================== Do we say, (a) Please lower down the fan. It's cool. (b) Please speed up the fan,it's quite hot. ...Read More...
No, I would not say sentences (c) and (d). the first two are OK.Read More...

Few pleasures

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Few pleasures can equal.....of a cook drink on a hot day." a. some b. any c. that d. those I chose "d =those" but the answer is "c=that". Please explain to me. Thanks.Read More...
This is ONLY my opinion. "Few pleasures can equal THAT of a cool drink on a hot day" is probably a short way to say: "Few pleasures can equal THE PLEASURE of a cool drink on a hot day." Thank you.Read More...

full

I went up there full of fire and brimstone. Is this correct sentence? And does 'full of fire and brimstone' modify 'I'? Thanks a lot!Read More...
This is ONLY my opinion. I think that your teacher would be very happy if you said that the prepositional phrase "of fire and brimstone" modified the adjective "full," and that "full" modified "I." Thank you.Read More...

Using after with the future simple

Dear Richard & Rachel , I have been told the following : ( The Simple Future cannot be used in clauses beginning with time expressions like after ). ** Would you please let me know your comment / kind explanation with examples? I'm waiting for your kind reply. Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
You're welcome Rachel.I'm glad that I could help.Read More...

of given/ of being given

The following is from an article in Reader’s Digest. As a result, the complainant [verbal abuse] is usually deported instead of given the opportunity to opt for a change of employer. My question: Is it acceptable to use “given” instead of “being given” after “of”? AppleRead More...
Re: of given/ of being givenRead More...

like me???

What does the following sentences mean? 1. You are not tall like me. 2. You are not tall as I am. Does it mean : I am taller than you? or we both are not tall? And what if we use a comma? 3. You are not tall, like me. 4. You are not tall, as I am.Read More...
All the sentences as they are are all right grammatically and at first glance, mean the same thing: the speaker is saying that he is tall and the other person is not tall. I think that sentence 1) is fine. The speaker is saying that he is tall but the other person is not tall. ‘Like’ is a preposition, of course, with ‘me’ as its object. This sentence is somewhat informal, even perhaps juvenile. Sentence 2) means the same thing as Sentence 1), and the style is a little formal. This sentence...Read More...

However

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if I wrote this sentence correctly? I would like to keep "However at the beginning of the sentence and the "always" in it. "However I always see this film, I am never tired of it." Thanks.Read More...
Yes, GrammarFan's and Okaasan's edits are fine. There's another possibility. We have no context here, and it may be that Coco is presenting a sentence in contrast with a previous one, and using 'however' to introduce the contrast. The previous sentence and the 'however' sentence could be something like this: There are many excellent old movies on TV, and I'd like to see all of them. However, I always watch The Graduate/ this film and I am never tired of it. _______ So first, the context is...Read More...

expect

1. Would you please let me know when to expect my order? 2. Would you please let me know when I can expect my order? 3. Would you please let me know when I can expect my order to arrive? Are the above three sentences all correct? Which sounds the most natural to you?Read More...
Thanks, Amy!Read More...

almost

Hello, Please help me on this. Is there any difference? I almost don't understand what she says. I don't understand almost what she says. Thanks a lot!Read More...
Hi iwtk People will occasionally say something such as "I almost don't understand" but it is not terribly common to use the phrase "almost don't". I'd also say you're more likely to hear it used in informal English. I would interpret "almost don't understand" to mean that the person does understand, but understanding is difficult. If you say "I almost understand", I would interpret that to mean that the person does NOT understand, but thinks that he/she might be close to being able to ...Read More...

hard

The situation had been hard on her because she felt so much pained. Am I correctly using 'hard'? Thank youRead More...
welkins, maybe it was just a mistake when you typed, but I believe that "she felt so much painED" is not considered standard English. Maybe you wanted to say that "she felt so much (a lot of) PAIN."Read More...

Comma?

Are commas needed after these words/phrases if they are at the beginning of a sentence? -Last -Next -First -Then -In the beginning -In the middle -In the endRead More...
The commas are optional here. If you want the equivalent of a pause, use the commas. I do usually use commas with these expressions, and that is all right, but the commas are not necessary. Here's what the Chicago Manual of Style* states: An adverbial or participial phrase at the beginning of a sentence is usually followed by a comma, especially if a slight pause is intended. A single word or a very short introductory phrase does not require a comma except to avoid misreading. After reading...Read More...

Very picky

- Peter is very picky in choosing clothes to wear. - Peter is very picky when it comes to buying clothes. - Are these 2 sentences natural? Thanks very much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
We would say: Peter is very picky about choosing clothes. OR, your second sentence: Peter is very picky when it comes to buying clothes.Read More...

advantageous

1. This machine is advantageous to reduce space for its interface and have convenient operation. 2. This machine is advantageous in which reduces space for its interface and has convenient operation. 3. This machine has many advantages to reduce space for its interface and have convenient operation. Are these sentences natural? Thanks a lot!Read More...
Thanks a million, Rachel and Amy.Read More...

question

engfan
Hello, I have a car,........? Is the question tag haven't I or don't I? I think they are correct! Is hven't I used in America only?Read More...
Grammar Fan, this is indeed a very informed answer. Thank you for posting it.Read More...

emphasis

Am I correct to say "I've always trusted you" instead of "I always trust you" so as to emphasize that I trust you?Read More...
Both are correct, and neither is better than the other. 'I've always trusted you' includes the time in the past, as you know, and 'I always trust you' means just now. Of course, with the verb 'trust' used with 'always,' it could also include the past.Read More...

Gerund or participle?

"What's the big idea, picking on her like that?" Is "picking" in that sentence a participle or a gerund? I have noticed that people have different views. I would appreciate it if Rachel and Exchange members gave me their views.Read More...
Rachel, thank you so much for your answer. I am so relieved to know that your answer matches mine. (The only difference is that I filled it out with "your" before the gerund.) Another person also agreed with you. (The only difference is that he deleted the "of.") And one gentleman parsed it as a participle,for he believed it = to be picking on her. Thanks so much for giving me more confidence!Read More...

preposition 'of'

Hi, Could you please help me? i wonder what the difference between the defence ministry and the ministry of defence grammatically is , and what the function of 'of' in the sentence is. Thanks.Read More...
yes, that's what i mean. Thanks.Read More...

‘push forward’ and ‘push back’

Can you explain the usage of ‘push forward’ and ‘push back’ when used together with a date. For example, ‘The Marina Bay Sands Integrated Resort's opening date has been pushed back a second time - this time to April next year.’ In the above sentence, is ‘pushed back’ used correctly? Instead of ‘push forward’, should it be ‘bring forward’? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Vincent: 'Push forward' is correct here; it means to make the date later. Expressions like 'push forward' and 'push back' have confused me for a long time. The both mean to make the date later. To make the date earlier, we can say 'moved up.' 'Bring forward' doesn't usually refer to dates.Read More...

is / will / will be fishing

Which is correct? Are they same in meaning? (a) He is fishing on Sundays. (b) He will be fishing on Sundays. (c) He will go fishing on Sundays.Read More...
I agree, Tonyjab. In that rather unusual situation, the present progressive could be used with 'on Sundays.'Read More...

exempt from / exempted from

Which of the following sentences is correct or are both correct? ‘He is exempt from National Service’ or ‘He is exempted from National Service’?Read More...
We would usually say, 'He is exempt.' In this case, the verb is a stative passive verb, and describes the state of the subject: He is exempt/ free from being called up to serve in the army. This is the current condition of the person, and it may be a permanent condition: He is exempt from public service because of his health. He never has to serve in the army. If we say 'exempted,' it refers to something that has happened to the person: someone has exempted him from service, at least at this...Read More...

Despite

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Are they possible? 1. I felt quite cold in spite of being sunny. 1. Despite the sunny weather,I felt cold. Thanks.Read More...
I agree with you, Okaasan: '...it being sunny' is correct. People who prefer more formal English would indeed use '...its being sunny.' In this particular sentence, it's a matter of style and preference. _______ A gerund should not always be modified by a possessive, though. Here is one instance where the possessive should not modify the gerund: Little Tommy was afraid of his falling down. We don't modify the gerund when the action is the subject's. We might say 'of his mother's/ of her...Read More...

purpose

Is there a difference in the meanings of: 1-I have a book to read on the train. 2-I have a book to be read on the train. 3-I have a book for reading on the train. Does 2 imply that the book has to be read on the train. Do any of these necessarily imply that I am the one who will read the book? Can't they be, for example , short for: 1a-I have a book for you to read on the train. 2a-I have a book to be read by you on the train. Does 3 imply that we are talking about a special kind of book...Read More...
This sentence means that I, the speaker, will read the book on the train. If the book is for another person to read, then you'd have to say, 'I have a book for you/ him/ her/ David to read on the train.' I agree with Okaasan about sentences 2 and 3.Read More...

capitalization

The country is located east on the earth. Do I need to captialize 'east'? Thank youRead More...
Yes, that's right. Names of actual regions or names of places are capitalized; as Okaasan mentions the Far East, the middle East, etc. So we'd say, for example, in the American South, in the Northeast,etc. On the other hand, directions are not capitalized. We'd say east of here, west of here, they traveled west, in western France, in southern Africa (but the country is South Africa).Read More...
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