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relative clause

She's not the brilliant dancer ---- she used to be. A) who B) which C) whom D) that E) whose Which one is correct?Read More...

Owners / staff?

Hi friends, Upon reading the story at the link below, I found some cultural points, so to speak, that are difficult for me to figure out. Please help me out. http://www.britishcouncil.org/...ories-pets-story.pdf The points are: 1. What is the difference between 'staff' and 'owners' in the passage? 2. Why did Alberto want his neighbor to be staff but not owners? 3. What does 'they' refer to in: “Make sure they give you food whenever you want!” “Sit on the newspaper while B]they[/B] are...Read More...

didn't fight/fought

Hello, We didn't fight recently . We haven't fought recently . With the adverb 'recently', can I use past with it? Thanks!Read More...

Metonymy

Dear all, Does this sentence apply metonymy? He's another Einstein . If not, what literary term is for this usage? Many thanks.Read More...

exposure/exposal

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me which word is correct in this case? "Many people limit their exposure/exposal to the sun because their skin burns very easily." Thank you.Read More...

using should in untrue past conditionals

joan
Is it possible to use should in the main clause of untrue past conditionals? For example: If you hadn't made that mistake,you should have passed your test. As we know, would , could or might can be used in the main clause of untrue past conditionals.Does it hold true for should ? Thanks!Read More...

'Be covered by or with?

This is the sentence. In some countries, the ground is covered by snow in winter. Is it correct? And are there any diferences in meaning from the sentence with 'with ' instead of 'by'? THANKS!Read More...

a good player to watch

Which are correct: 1-He is a good player to watch . You can learn a lot from him. 2-He is a player good to watch . You can learn a lot from him. 3-He is a good player to play in offensive matches. 4-He is a player good to play in offensive matches. (Is 'he' the subject of 'to play'?) 5-He is a good player for playing in offensive matches. 6-He is a player good for playing in offensive matches. (Is 'he' the subject of 'to play'?) I think that the structure in 3 can sometimes be ambiguous.Read More...

which

The rise of a new major financial center in Asia (or anywhere else, for that matter) will depend on several factors, the most important of which will be whether officials in New York and London finally decide to make the kind of regulatory changes that now seem imminent and necessary. Does 'which' indicate 'several factors'? And is 'factor' omitted after 'the most important'? Thanks a lot.Read More...

... [a / the] person that Philby knew (that) Angleton suspected.

Do you accept (1) and (2)? (1) Dulles was a person that Philby knew (that) Angleton suspected. (2) Dulles was the person that Philby knew (that) Angleton suspected. I'd appreciate it if you could also let us know if the first "that" in both can be safely omitted. Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGA In my prediction (I wish I had a better intuition about English use), it all comes down to the difference between (3a) and (3b). (3) a. Kerry is [one/a person] we're after. b. Kerry is [the one/...Read More...

Who did Philby know [who / whom /φ] Angleton suspected? 

Now I know (1) may not be ambiguous to some native speakers, and the "that" clause is taken to be a relative clause (but not a complement of the main verb). (1)Who did Philby know that Angleton suspected? Then we can explore the possibility that we can replace "that" with a wh -word.  My question is, Do you accept all of the three below? (2) a. Who did Philby know who Angleton suspected?  b. Who did Philby know whom Angleton suspected?  c. Who did Phlby know φ Angleton suspected? By φ (phi),...Read More...

for

Hi, It depends on how long you want the car for . It depends on how long you want the car. Is is OK to remove the preposition 'for' there? Thanks!Read More...

while I worked/working?

Hi, "Finally, I again thank my family for their patience and support while I worked on this book." Shouldn't the part in bold be "while I was working"?Read More...

"Your wife’s popped?"

Hi, "Your wife’s popped?" Does this sentence have any meaning in British English and/or American English? If so, what? Grateful for your comments. Thanks. Warmest regards, SusanRead More...

seeing green

Hello, I'm seeing green What does the phrase mean? Thanks a lot!Read More...

Who did Philby know "that" Angleton suspected?

I'd like to ask about the interpretation of (1), though the author didn't mention that (1) is actually ambiguous. (1) Who did Philby know that Angleton suspected? (R. May, Logical Form ) Do you agree that (1) can be rewritten either as (2) or (3)? (2) a. Who, [of/among] those Philby knew, did Angleton suspect? b. Who did Philby know of that Angleton suspected? (3) Who, [of/among] those Angleton suspected, did Philby know he suspected? Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGA I'd appreciate it if...Read More...

How do you mean?

Richard/Rachel, I'm beginning to think that I've been using the question, "What do you mean?" wrongly, all my life. I've been using it to respond to any situation where I wanted someone to further explain what he or she had said. For instance, if Joe said to me, "You can't trust Rick", I would say, "What do you mean?" If Bubba says, "That's silly, Gilbert!", I would also respond with "What do you mean?". If Jack says, "It's not working out between Jill and me," I would still say, "What do...Read More...

I like lonely!

Hi, would be glad if I could have an opinion on this: Ray: Well, I live on my own far away from the city with a couple of hobbies to help me pass the time... Rick:Gee, don't you feel lonely? Ray: I like lonely ! Is the bit in bold acceptable in conversational language? I'm asking this because I've heard it being used on TV. Many thanks. GilbertRead More...

as such

Is this sentence correct: Today you see me doing my turn of inspection as I do every Wednesday, on behalf of the Quartermaster's Department. As such, I am about to inspect the kitchens. What does 'such' refer to here? As far as I can see, there is no noun preceding it that it could refer to.Read More...
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