All Forum Topics

ate some egg soup

Hi, I ate some egg soup . Is is OK to say that way instead of; I had some egg soup . Thanks!Read More...

Reports him as demanding who

Hello, Rachel and Richard: Do you find this rare or perhaps obsolete: "reports Sir Magnus as demanding who" instead of "reports that Sir Magnus demands/is demanding who?" ----- [Talking about the use of degrees] 'What about a degree?' 'Bill Truscott reports Sir Magnus as demanding who the hell wants a degree these days; and saying all he needs is men who know the world, and can act and think quickly." 'Strong stuff.' Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time: Spring, p. 142. --- Thanks.Read More...

In general or In detail

joan
Which choice can complete the gap? Both men and women are living longer these days in industrialized countries. However,women, on the average,live longer._______ , they can expect to live six or seven years more than men. (A)In general (B)By no means (C)In detail (D)As a result Thanks!Read More...

List of Chunks?

Hi, I am teaching teaching English for beginners. I would like you to help me find a list of chunks that are suitable for beginners. I did some search but didn't find what I want. You can give whatever chunks that you think beginners should learn. And I will select the most suitable for my students.Read More...

as many as = up to

(1) comes from LDCE4 . (1)as many as 50/1000 etc used to emphasize how surprisingly large a number is: As many as 10,000 civilians are thought to have fled the area. I think if it is (2), I have no difficulty at all understanding what LDCE4 is saying. (2) As many as 10,000 civilians (have) fled the area. (10,000 civilians (have) fled the area; 10,000 is a surprisingly large number.) But the example sentence LDCE4 gives us is talking about an estimate (but not about a fact). So the number can...Read More...

"exactly 30 %" or "30 % or less"

(2) is an example of (1). (Both come from LDCE4) (1) not/no more than sth used to emphasize that a particular number, amount, distance etc is not large: (2) Opinion polls show that no more than 30% of people trust the government. I have two questions for (2). #1: Am I right in thinking that what LDCE4 is saying here is that "no more than 30%" means "at most 30%" (but not "exactly 30%)? #2: I think that (depending on context) "no more than 30%" in (2) can also mean "the surprisingly small...Read More...

it's as cold as in an icebox?

Hi, Here is an excerpt from our textbook: The Penguins I'm Peter Penguin. Fanny Penguin is my wife. Most of the time we live in the water. It is as cold as in an icebox. We can only see snow and ice in our world, but it is not all white. There are other colors, too. Is it correct to say "it is as cold as in an icebox"? Thanks!Read More...

there's

Is "A cat is on the table." or do I have to say: "There's a cat on the table."?Read More...

We took a bone-jarring three-hour drive.

Hi, We took a bone-jarring three-hour drive. Should there be a comma after bone-jarring. I am really not sure. Although you can interchange - bone-jarring and three-hour - they are different concepts so I am not sure. Grateful for your input. Thanks. Cheers, SusanRead More...

Persuade sb do sth

I was just looking up the word instigate in LDOCE Online , when I came across this sentence there: 2. to persuade someone do something bad or violent "Persuade" needs "to," doesn' it?! Is this a kind of typo or sth in LDOCE then?!Read More...

On Grammar?

Dear R & R The part below is quoted form Betty Azar's article in this week. http://azargrammar.com/teacherTalk/blog/ "The ideal tutor for this student would probably be a law student who has taught ESL or is thoroughly versed in English grammar. But, unfortunately, even among native speakers these days, precious few know much about English grammar ( due to an ideological misdirection taken in our field beginning in the 1960s )." I don't understand what is meant by the part in bold.Read More...

The American, Honthorst's, hair ...

Hello, Rachel and Richard: Any rules for the possessive in this case? I see the "'s" only after "Honthorst," not after "American": ---- The American, Honthorst's, hair was almost as uncontrolled as that of Members. Anthony Powell, A Dance to the Music of Time, p. 122. ---- Thanks.Read More...

Shouting to Somebody?

Hi, 1. Say that I would like to shout to someone whom I don't know. What should I say? 2. Say that I would like to draw someone's attention. Yet that someone is about 20 meters or so ahead. What should I say?Read More...

me either, me neither

I don't want to go. (1)Me either. (2)Me neither. Are they both (1)(2) correct? Any difference? (1) is more informal? AppleRead More...

pill

Hi, guys!! when you refer to a pill to make people love you, do you call it a love pill, or a loving pill? Thank you!Read More...

tyger?

Hi, Was the word 'tiger' written as 'tyger' in OE or ME, for example? http://www.britishcouncil.org/...tral-poems-tyger.pdfRead More...
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